Talk:Bruce Heyman

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Additional info for Wikipedia page: Ambassador Bruce Heyman[edit]

Hello editors,

I am an employee of the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa, where were would like to flesh out Ambassador Heyman's Wikipedia page with additional information about his life and career. We have conducted research to cite the following biographical information, and have grouped it in a way that should fit easily into his existing profile. Our hope is that one or more of you might take this raw info and incorporate it into the Ambassador's page. Please comment if there is anything else we can do to facilitate the process and/or answer any questions.

Thank you for your time!

ThorneEA613 (talk) 16:03, 2 June 2016 (UTC)

Early Life and Education

Bruce Alan Heyman born in March in Elmira, New York (Chemung County)[1]; eldest child of Miles and Sherry (Moldoff) Heyman. Family moved to Dayton, OH, one year later.[2]

1974: Participated in American Institute of Foreign Studies (AIFS) summer study abroad program in Tarragona, Spain.[3]

1975: Graduated high school from The Miami Valley School, Dayton, OH (in three years).[4]

1979: Graduated magna cum laude from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN, with Bachelor of Arts & Science Degree; double major in Economics and Business.[5]

1980: Graduated from the Owen Graduate School of Management MBA program[6] at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN.

Served as undergraduate legislative council representative for two years at Vanderbilt University; ran for president of the student body.[7]

Career

June 1980: Joined Goldman Sachs & Co. training program in Manhattan, NY.[8]

1981: Associate, Private Client Services division of Goldman Sachs & Co. (Chicago, IL).[9]

1985-1999: Vice President, Goldman Sachs & Co.[10]

1997: Associate Regional Manager, Chicago Private Client Group, Goldman Sachs & Co.[11]

1999: Co-head of Global Recruiting, Investment Management Division, Goldman Sachs & Co.[12]

1999: Managing Director, Goldman Sachs & Co.[13]

2001: Regional Manager, Midwest Private Wealth Management, Goldman Sachs & Co.;[14] Represented 13 states and half of Canada.[15]

2004: Partner, Goldman Sachs & Co., Chicago.[16]

January 1, 2014: Retires as partner, assumes role of Advisory Director at Goldman Sachs & Co.[17]

March 12, 2014: Steps down as Advisory Director at Goldman Sachs & Co. on date of confirmation as U.S. Ambassador to Canada.[18]

Political Activities

1977 & 1978: Intern, U.S. House of Representatives, for Congressman Charles Whalen (R-Ohio, 3rd Congressional District), Washington, D.C.[19]

1979: Summer researcher, U.S. House of Representatives, Small Business Committee, Antitrust and Restraint of Trade Subcommittee, Washington, D.C.[20]

2008 & 2012: Fundraised for Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns; served on the campaigns’ Illinois Finance Committee and National Finance Committee (NFC), alongside wife Vicki Heyman.[21]

Achievements/Recognition and Community Work

Served for several years on the Finance Committee of the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago.[22]

1995: Received Goldman Sachs Community Service award for the Equities Division.[23]

1996: Became president of the Cabrini Green Tutoring Program.[24]

1997: Elected president of the Owen Graduate School of Management Alumni board in 1997.[25]

2001-2012: Board of Managers, YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago.[26][27][28][29][30][31]

2014: Named by Canadian Business as one of the Top 50 Most Powerful Business People.[32]

2014: Becomes member of Fulbright Canada Board of Directors.[33]

2015: Gave keynote address at Niagara University Graduate Commencement Ceremony[34] and presented with honorary Doctor of Humane Letters.[35]

2016: Named by Canadian Business as one of the Top 50 Most Powerful Business People.[36]

Personal Life

Classmates with Vicki Simons at Vanderbilt University.[37] They married on June 15, 1980 in Ashland, Boyd County, KY.[38]

Has three children: David, Liza, Caroline[39] and three grandchildren.[40]

  1. ^ Jacobs, Donna. "Emphasizing the Positive". Diplomat & International Canada Magazine. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  2. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 22. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  3. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 19. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  4. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 24. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  5. ^ "Ambassador Bruce A. Heyman". Fulbright Canada. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  6. ^ "Bruce Heyman confirmed by U.S. Senate as ambassador to Canada". Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  7. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 25. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  8. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 20. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  9. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 26. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  10. ^ Palmer, Ann Therese. "Goldman Sachs partner learned value of 'overcommunication'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  11. ^ Palmer, Ann Therese. "Goldman Sachs partner learned value of 'overcommunication'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  12. ^ Palmer, Ann Therese. "Goldman Sachs partner learned value of 'overcommunication'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  13. ^ Palmer, Ann Therese. "Goldman Sachs partner learned value of 'overcommunication'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  14. ^ Palmer, Ann Therese. "Goldman Sachs partner learned value of 'overcommunication'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  15. ^ "Ambassador Bruce A. Heyman". Fulbright Canada. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  16. ^ Palmer, Ann Therese. "Goldman Sachs partner learned value of 'overcommunication'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  17. ^ Jacobs, Donna. "Emphasizing the Positive". Diplomat & International Canada Magazine. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  18. ^ Jacobs, Donna. "Emphasizing the Positive". Diplomat & International Canada Magazine. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  19. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 25. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  20. ^ Palmer, Ann Therese. "Goldman Sachs partner learned value of 'overcommunication'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  21. ^ Potter, Mitch; Campion-Smith, Bruce. "Obama fundraiser Bruce Heyman to be new U.S. ambassador to Canada". Toronto Star. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  22. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 28. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  23. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 28. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  24. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 28. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  25. ^ "Ambassador Bruce A. Heyman". Fulbright Canada. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  26. ^ "2004 Annual Report" (PDF). YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  27. ^ "2005 Annual Report" (PDF). YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  28. ^ "2006 Annual Report" (PDF). YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  29. ^ "2007 Annual Report" (PDF). YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  30. ^ "2008 Annual Report" (PDF). YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  31. ^ "2010 Annual Report" (PDF). YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  32. ^ CB Staff. "Canada's 50 Most Powerful Business People 2014: U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman". Canadian Business. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  33. ^ "Ambassador Bruce A. Heyman". Fulbright Canada. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  34. ^ "Graduate Commencement 2015". YouTube. Niagara University. Retrieved 10 May 2016.  Text " Ambassador Bruce A. Heyman" ignored (help)
  35. ^ Freedman, Michael. "Ambassador Heyman, Leonhardt, Brennan Highlight Commencement 2015". Niagara University News. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  36. ^ CB Staff. "Canada's Most Powerful Business People 2016: #25 — Bruce Heyman". Canadian Business. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  37. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 18. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  38. ^ Thaler, Lisa (1998). Enduring Legacies. Chelsea, MI: BookCrafters. p. 17. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  39. ^ "Ambassador Bruce A. Heyman". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Canada. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  40. ^ "Ambassador Bruce A. Heyman". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Canada. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 


Greetings, @ThorneEA613: I finally got around to looking through your proposed additions. I've incorporated some portions of them into the article, as you can see in the Early Life and Education, Career, and Personal Life sections.
  • I opted to move the info about his internship on the Hill in the Early Life and Education section as opposed to the Political Activities section as it felt more relevant to his education/early career. I put it in the Education section instead of the Career section because Heyman was still a Vanderbilt student when he was interning. But I can easily understand if others feel the internship is more appropriate for the Career section because of its role in his early career. I wouldn't mind either way.
  • The only addition I felt a little uncomfortable with was the list of Achievements. I incorporated some of them in the Career section (e.g. his commencement address and him being named one of the Top 50 Most Powerful Business People). Usually, an awards section for diplomats would be warranted if he received a major, notable State Department award, like a Superior Honor Award (But even then, Awards sections would only be for really extensive lists). Diplomats who receive maybe one or two Superior Honor Awards or equivalents would have likely just one sentence attributed to that in the Career section. In any case, the list of achievements you provided seemed appropriate to me for the Career section, rather than a stand-alone separate section for Awards or Achievements.
For this article to be improved even more (from the perspective of a regular editor, or from the perspective of an assessor for WP:BIO or WP:USGOV), I think the article could use some information on the Ambassador's recent activities in Canada. A good example of this would be the ambassador section on Ambassador Caroline Kennedy's page. I hope this helps! Let me know if you'd like any additional assistance. GabeIglesia (talk) 15:26, 21 June 2016 (UTC)