Talk:Buddhism in Southeast Asia

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Lead Section[edit]

The lead section lists facts and does not summarize the articles main points.Rachelseagren (talk) 20:23, 14 September 2016 (UTC) Rachel Seagren

Citations Needed[edit]

There are multiple paragraphs that do not have a single citation in them. Rachelseagren (talk) 20:29, 14 September 2016 (UTC) Rachel Seagren

Sections Needed[edit]

Add information about the Buddha and Chakravartin. Add information about monastic life. Add more specific information pertaining to Buddhism in specific countries within Southeast Asia. Buddhist art and architectural structures in Southeast Asia could be something interesting and fun to add to the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Kylaohayon (talkcontribs) 22:41, 20 September 2016 (UTC)

Hello. Welcome to Wikipedia. I am User:WilliamThweatt. I edit frequently in articles related to Southeast Asia. I see this article is being used in a class. I'd like to point out, in case those who are taking on this article aren't aware, we have individual articles dedicated to Buddhism in specific countries: Buddhism in Cambodia, Buddhism in Thailand, Buddhism in Laos, Buddhism in Myanmar, etc. The focus of general articles such as this one usually includes history (how did Buddhism come to the region; how was it diffused from/to successive civilizations, how has it developed in the region in ways that make it unique from other regions, etc.), commonalities in the practices/beliefs of individual countries as well as differences, interconnectedness of Buddhism among the countries of SEA (for example, historically Thai and Khmer Buddhists have shared clergy, Thai monks have trained in Cambodia and Khmer monks have trained in Thailand, but there is a modern movement in Cambodia to distance themselves from Thai influence; see Maha Nikaya, Dhammayuttika Nikaya, Buddhism in Cambodia#Modernists and Traditionalists, etc.) There are plenty of sources in all of these articles from which to draw relevant information for improving this article.
Additionally, the current history section is woefully inadequate and, in some cases, misleading. For example, the Khmer Empire was Hindu for most of its existence. As they took over lands formerly under the influence of Dvaravati and others, they absorbed and incorporated Buddhist peoples, but the state and most of their monuments, including Angkor Wat, were Hindu. They had a few Buddhist kings, such as Jayavarman VII (reigned 1181–1219), but they were Mahayana, not the Theravada of today and their successors usually violently restored Hinduism, destroying and uprooting any signs of Buddhism. Not until Srindravarman (reigned 1295–1309) was Theravada established as the state religion. In fact, one theory is that the decline of the Khmer Empire was precipitated by the conversion from Vishnuite-Shivaite Hinduism to Theravada Buddhism because it radically affected the social and political systems. The section doesn't even mention Dvaravati, or the Mon people. So, the history section needs an expansion and complete rewrite to accurately reflect how and when Buddhism, it its various forms, took root in Southeast Asia.--William Thweatt TalkContribs 01:40, 21 September 2016 (UTC)

Source for history of Buddhism in Vietnam[edit]

I found this book for history of how Buddhism came to Vietnam.

[1] Rachelseagren (talk) 18:51, 28 September 2016 (UTC)Rachel Seagren

  1. ^ Tai Thu, Nguyen (2008). The History of Buddhism in Vietnam. The Council for Research in Values and Philosophy. ISBN 1-56518-098-4.