Talk:Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo

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Wrong Header[edit]

The header is wrong. The last buffalo shouldnt have a capital letter and the second to last should. God I feel so pedantic right now!

You're kind of right. There are two different valid orderings of upper-case and lower-case, and each have slightly different meanings. Maybe there are more meanings! I'll try to paraphrase the various meanings, while preserving the word order. However, I will say "bison from Buffalo" instead of "Buffalo bison".
"Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo" means "bison from Buffalo, that bison from Buffalo bully, themselves bully bison from Buffalo"
another version is:
"Buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo", but that's slightly harder to understand. Buffalo (adverb) buffalo (noun) buffalo (verb) Buffalo(adverb) buffalo (noun) Buffalo (adverb) buffalo (noun) buffalo (verb). To understand this, consider "bison from Buffalo bully X". X is the noun, or Noun phrase, that are the victims of the bullying by bison from Buffalo. You could, for simplicity, replace X with "bison from London", but you can go further and say "which bison from London?". Answer, the bison from London that are bullied by bison from New York. i.e. the victims are the "bison from London that bison from New York bully".
The "that" is optional in English, so you can say "bison from London bison from New York bully". Finally, returning to the original word order, you can say: Buffalo bison bully London bison (that) New York bison bully. And then, you can replace 'London' and 'New York' with 'Buffalo'
Aaron McDaid (talk - contribs) 18:01, 26 December 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 3 July 2014[edit]

The sentence example has the verbs, noun, and adverbs mixed up. It should be Buffalo (adverb) buffalo (noun) buffalo (verb) Buffalo(adverb) buffalo (noun) Buffalo (adverb) buffalo (noun) buffalo (verb).

220.233.41.204 (talk) 23:03, 3 July 2014 (UTC)

Red question icon with gradient background.svg Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. Sam Sailor Sing 07:09, 4 July 2014 (UTC)
(edit conflict) I understand what you're saying, but the article's formulation of the sentence is correct, and follows the formulation found in the sources. Try looking at it again. DoctorKubla (talk) 07:12, 4 July 2014 (UTC)
other sources point out that there really isn't just one 'correct formulation', as the sentence is ambiguous. The number of correct formulations may be considered as an excersise 20040302 (talk) 00:34, 4 March 2015 (UTC) 00:33, 4 March 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 15 January 2015[edit]

"Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo" is the title of singer/songwriter Chris Faroe's[1] 2013 debut album.DrudePJ (talk) 18:05, 15 January 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: Non-notable artist. Sam Sing! 19:57, 15 January 2015 (UTC)

Why only 8 buffalo?[edit]

Here's a version with 9:

- Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo. (Buffalo bison [who] Buffalo bison bully, bully Buffalo bison [who] Buffalo bison bully.)

Or even 13:

- Buffalo Buffalo buffalo Buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo. (Buffalo Buffalo bison [who] Buffalo Buffalo bison bully, bully [other] bison [who] Buffalo Buffalo bison bully.)

I specify that the bison are Buffalo-originating and presently Buffalo-residing bison, making them Buffalo Buffalo bison (as opposed to "Texan Buffalo" bison, who would be bison residing in Texas but which originated in Buffalo). Here's the same sentence but with a subject that hurts less to read:

- American Siberian cats [who] American Siberian cats bully, bully [other] cats [who] American Siberian cats bully.

It's needlessly specific but still grammatically correct... I think. Nawoa (talk) 23:40, 10 May 2015 (UTC)

You're correct that there's no reason to stop at eight. As the Language Log post in the "External links" section confirms, any arbitrarily long string of "buffalo"s is grammatical. If you wish we could mention this fact in the article. However, there's probably no point in using something other than the 8-buffalo or 5-buffalo sentences as the article's title and main examples, since those two are probably the most widely encountered versions. —Psychonaut (talk) 07:31, 11 May 2015 (UTC)
You can extend the sentence with not just the fact that some buffalo are from Buffalo, but some use specifically Buffalo-style buffaloing.
So, "Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo." [Buffalo bison that Buffalo bison Buffalo-style buffalo, themselves Buffalo-style buffalo the Buffalo buffalo!] 174.119.113.31 (talk) 01:31, 28 August 2015 (UTC)

ambiguity of parse.[edit]

The article appears to assert just one parsing approach to 8B. Whereas, there are others. Following the reduced (non-adjectival) 5B, it is clear that this may be parsed in several ways:

  • Buffalo (that other) buffalo bully (themselves) bully buffalo.
  • Buffalo bully buffalo (that other) buffalo bully.
  • Buffalo (that other) buffalo (that other) buffalo bully (themselves) bully.

etc. The ambiguity of parse is a salient aspect to this kind of phrase. (20040302 (talk) 13:09, 16 June 2015 (UTC))

OK, I've updated the article to reflect the fact (which I hope we can all agree is fairly obvious rather than original research) that the sentence is syntactically ambiguous. —Psychonaut (talk) 13:26, 16 June 2015 (UTC)