Talk:Bulgogi

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Ingredients[edit]

Bulgogi is meat, sugar, soy sauce, and other stuff that is regional, or family recipe type stuff. I altered the article a little to reflect that.

While I'm at it though, this page IS copied verbatim off the trifood page. I made a few edits to reflect more than just their recipe of the dish. Hazzayoungn 07:03, 9 July 2007 (UTC)

The Ingredients section makes no sense any more. The first part refers to pear juice and "spices". The detailed list has no pear juice, and the only spice is pepper. Can somebody come up with a better discussion of what should and shouldn't be in the marinade, and why? Groogle (talk) 06:33, 20 April 2008 (UTC)

Picture[edit]

The picture actually is not Bulgogi. it is just roasted beef.--Hairwizard91 06:58, 30 October 2006 (UTC)

I think we need an actual picture of bulgogi, then.Erik-the-red

Much of the description was directly copied from the trifood.com page...

Name[edit]

Is it "bulgogi" or "bul go gi"? The usage in the article is inconsistent. --OGoncho (talk) 02:41, 28 February 2008 (UTC)


Also it says it is pronounced as PULGOGI??????????

A modern and well informed Korean will not like that you put a chinese accent using the "P" sound.

It was 2 or 3 years ago that China made a small statement saying that both north and south Korea are really just Chinese.

This made North and South Korea very very angry and they decided together to rename any city in North Korea or South Korean into KOREAN PHONETICS.

So It is not Pulgogi. It is Bulgogi..... It is not the city Pusan It is now Busan.


There now! Investigate that! You will see This is true and I hope some wiki nerd will do their diligent work and add this information about the correct pronunciation...........

Grrrrr! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 139.85.238.204 (talk) 19:25, 6 May 2008 (UTC)

Regarding the question regarding pronunciation, I was under the impression (keeping in mind that I am NOT a Korean speaker and just starting to learn Hangeul) that the "bieup" consonant (ㅂ) becomes aspirated to more of a "p" sound when it is located at the beginning of a word, but would otherwise have a "b" sound in the initial position of a syllable. Is this incorrect? Or is this perhaps a regional saturi variation? 128.83.93.168 (talk) 13:53, 16 June 2017 (UTC)

The word is pronounced as /bʊlˈɡɡ/ in English. In Korean, it is pronounced as [pul.ɡo.ɡi]. As 128.83.93.168 said, word-initial bieup is usually (relatively mildly) aspirated, while inter-vocalic (or more precisely, inter-sonorant) bieup is usually (fully or partially) voiced. If an English speaker pronounce a word-initial bieup as a typical English /p/, however, most Korean speakers will consistently hear it as Korean pieup. Pronouncing bieup as English /b/ (which is also often voiceless in the word-initial position, but not aspirated) is always a safer option. Although word-initial bieup is often identified with the following vowel's (lower) pitch by the younger (in the sense that they are not super-old) speakers of Seoul Korean, a sufficient length of VOT lag (aspiration) will make a /p/ sound like a pieup to Korean ears. English /p/ is also usually followed by a higher-pitched vowel. If you are interested, Korean phonology article is quite helpful. --Dallae (talk) 15:10, 16 June 2017 (UTC)

Broiling[edit]

Should broiling have been removed, as it was here? Badagnani (talk) 00:14, 11 September 2008 (UTC)

Bulgogi eaten by Joseon royals?![edit]

The idea that bulgogi was eaten by the royals of the Joseon Dynasty seems dubious. The Royals of Korea ate vegetarian cuisine. I believe that the Korean BBQ beef craze is a modern phenomenon (of the past 30-50 years). Can someone please confirm this? Thanks, ask123 (talk) 21:49, 20 April 2009 (UTC)

You don't know Korean history and Korean cuisine at all given your assertive comment but totally false information; "The Royals of Korea ate vegetarian cuisine". Where did you get the idea? If you argued that "Eating meat was "discouraged" during the Goryeo Dynasty" in which Buddhism was flourished, well, I may think your recent deletion from the article might've had some merits. You'd better read Korean cuisine and Korean royal court cuisine. Scholars say Korean eating marinated grilled meat (prototypes of bulgogi with various names such as maekjeok, neobiani and etc.) trace back to the three Kingdoms period of Korea, especially by Goguryeo people. Regards.--Caspian blue 00:16, 21 April 2009 (UTC)

The very words bulgogi and galbi are not used for popular dishes until well into the Japanese Occupation period. One cannot begin to wonder if there were some influences form the Japanese Yakinikku on these new dishes. 2605:6000:BFC0:1:6411:53E6:7853:BE5A (talk) 04:10, 7 November 2014 (UTC)

Read the yakiniku article. It is a variant of bulgogi that has been adapted to Japanese taste (first made by ethnic Koreans in Japan). Most Japanese consider it to be a Korean dish, or a Korean-derived dish, or at least a Korean-influenced dish. --Epulum (talk) 18:43, 8 April 2017 (UTC)

Use of the word prime in describing cuts[edit]

Is using the word prime in describing the cuts the dish is made of, problematic? Would it be too US centric to change the wording to something like "premium" or "tender" because "prime" in regards to beef has specific legal meaning as a quality grade?

22 on Cnn's Most Delicious foods ?[edit]

I dont think its fair to cite this source as it is just one persons opinion on a subject which is entirely arbitrary. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.209.201.227 (talk) 08:09, 1 May 2015 (UTC)

I agree, and have removed it from the article. Conifer (talk) 01:19, 2 May 2015 (UTC)


don't delete relevant facts for no reason[edit]

different version of Bulkogi's history with its export to ancient China which someone deletes on the main article

When made in households, Bulkogi is often (but not necessarily) made stewed in juice, wrinkly, extremely thin. This isn’t the original way. Bulkogi is cut thin, but there is a little thickness about 5mm. [1] It should be neither wrinkly nor stewed in juice. [2] Also, as recorded in Donggooksesigi, it was originally grilled on a Korean barbecue grill (Hwaro) still used in restaurants in concept, so its juice can't be pooled in the first place. The original Bulkogi was also made skewered on fire. [3]

The original Bulkogi (not stewed in juice, not wrinkly, thin but not too thin) is still made today, mostly in restaurants but also in some households. Also, there are many different types of marinated meat in Korean such as Yangnyumkalbi. Similar to the well made original style Bulkogi, it has a little thickness, not stewed in juice, not wrinkly. [4]

In Chosunyorijebub (1939), Bulkogi was recorded as “thinly sliced meat is marinated with soy sauce, crushed green onion, sesame, black pepper, sugar, then grilled.” In medieval Sushingi, it is recorded as “soy sauce & garlic are used”. This is generally the same as Bulkogi sauce & grilling method even today. [5]

Korean marinated meat (Bulkogi) has been popular & has been adopted in China & Japan. Japan traditionally never had such meat dish. During the modern era, Japan copied Korean Bulkogi, and it has become the favorite (most popular) meat dish in Japan called Yakiniku. The cooking recipe, including the sauce & the marination, is from Korean Bulkogi. On top of it, Bulkogi means fire meat while Yakiniku also means fire meat. So, the names match, and the recipes match. On the other hand, Korean always has had this dish (historically recorded) while Japan never had such meat dish. Even in ancient China before China had developed cooking like today, Korean Maekjok (ancient Bulkogi) was very popular in China as much as Yehoi. [6]

Japanese is usually known more for Sushi & raw fish (although raw fish is not exclusively Japanese but has been eaten in Korea as well traditionally with such historical records), but Yakiniku is the most popular meat dish in Japan. Japan doesn’t talk openly about it and Korean Bulkogi is not that well known, but that is Korean origin. Japanese Yakiniku is Korean origin. There are many styles & types of Bulkogi. The original style is Nobiani made thicker (thin but not that thin), without juice, without wrinkle. Also, Bulkogi has many types like Yangnyumkalbi.

According to "Race, Ethnicity and Migration in Modern Japan" by Michael Weiner, "Yakiniku is a Japanese word simply meaning "cooked meat" and used to denote a grilled meat cuisine found in Korean restaurants in Japan. The mainland Korean equivalent is Bulugogi but the two cuisines are not entirely the same Yakuniku is a variant of cooked meat that has been modified by Zainichi Koreans to appeal to Japanese tastes." [7]

References

  1. ^ Bulkogi is originally 5mm thick
  2. ^ Bulkogi is sliced thin but not too thin originally
  3. ^ Chosundaesesigi
  4. ^ Korean Marinated Meat
  5. ^ Bulkogi & Yakiniku are traditionally Korean without any difference
  6. ^ Bulkogi was popular in ancient China
  7. ^ Race, Ethnicity and Migration in Modern Japan: Indigenous and colonial others By Michael Weiner (P236)[1] "Yakiniku is a Japanese word simply meaning "cooked meat" and used to denote a grilled meat cuisine found in Korean restaurants in Japan.[citation needed] The mainland Korean equivalent is Bulugogi but the two cuisines are not entirely the same Yakuniku is a variant of cooked meat that has been modified by Zainichi Koreans to appeal to Japanese tastes."

Wikibreaking (talk) 18:24, 4 January 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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"red pepper"[edit]

The section "Preparation and serving" mentions "red pepper", which is linked to the Wiki article on "Black pepper". Does "red pepper" actually mean the preserved red peppercorns mentioned in that article? Or does it mean the sweet fruit "red pepper" (like green or yellow pepper, but red?) or does it mean hot pepper? --Richardson mcphillips (talk) 11:20, 8 April 2017 (UTC)

@Richardson mcphillips: It seems like the original word was "black pepper" until someone changed it into "red pepper". Ground black pepper is a common ingredient in bulgogi and other meat dishes. Although sweet red bell peppers are also used in Korean dishes, "red pepper" often means red chili. --Epulum (talk) 11:37, 8 April 2017 (UTC)
thanks. Richardson mcphillips (talk) 15:19, 9 April 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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