Talk:C. S. Lewis

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Former good article C. S. Lewis was one of the Language and literature good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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From WikiBooks[edit]

"The Screwtape Letters" is fiction. But only fiction in the sense that the characters and the dialogue sprang from the imagination of one of the greatest modern Christian writers. Yet in our terrestrial reality the issues confronted in this book play out in our lives every day.

— WikiBooks

...since it is technically classified as “fiction”[1]-- let me say that it is essentially non-fiction, ...[2]

— CBN

Although the book is technically fiction, it is, nevertheless, non-fiction in that it illustrates real spiritual principles based on a solid understanding of human nature and the spiritual world.

References

CS Lewis clearly distinguishes between his fictional and his non-fiction writing. To make the argument that a work is not fiction because it contains truth, even truth of great importance, is nonsense. Fiction is a medium or vehicle for communicating ideas, and the great fiction writers communicate very important ideas. If the characters are invented, and the storyline or plot is "made up from whole cloth," then the work is fiction, but to minimize the value of the ideas contained in the fiction is to miss the entire point of the work, its raison d'etre, if you will pardon my very poor grasp of French. All great fiction contains great ideas, which in many cases involve truthes critical to the development of society, if not to your immortal soul. To minimize the value of fiction because it's "only stories" is to strip away some of the richness of our culture. All of our great music is "made up." Poetry is certainly made up, ALL of it. Most painting is made up, and that which is based on "real life" certainly benefits by the interpretation of the artist's eye and hand. In the words of the father of one of our American best-selling authors, "I know it's true because I made it up myself." Rags (talk) 15:40, 1 October 2015 (UTC)

Conscripted or volunteered in WWI?[edit]

At the end of the "Childhood" section, it says Lewis was conscripted, but the "First World War" section says he volunteered. The sources I have checked don't make it clear which version is correct. If anyone has a source that does make it clear, please amend the article. KarenSutherland (talk) 15:42, 21 June 2015 (UTC)

I think I see what the problem is here. In Surprised by Joy, he says he joined the Officers' Training Corps at Oxford (which is voluntary) "as my most promising route into the army" and from there was "drafted" into a Cadet Battalion (pp. 186-7). I don't think that "drafted" means quite the same thing as "conscripted" in this instance, as he was already being trained for the military and was not just a member of the general public. I will see if I can change the article to reflect this. (Just to mention, George Sayer in his book Jack talks more in depth about Lewis' time in the O.T.C. at Oxford.) Rmm413 (talk) 18:15, 7 September 2015 (UTC)

British?[edit]

This article would have a whole lot more credibility if it started out with getting his nationality correct ... he's Irish!— Preceding unsigned comment added by Irishocity (talkcontribs) 08:25, 30 November 2015‎ (UTC)

See the previous section [added: which has since been moved to the archives] -- and many, many discussions in the archives. -- Elphion (talk) 22:48, 30 November 2015 (UTC)
He clearly self-identified as Irish though. 109.149.121.174 (talk) 00:19, 23 December 2015 (UTC)
Yes, and also as British, and as Anglican. None of these alone aptly describes him. -- Elphion (talk) 18:12, 23 December 2015 (UTC)
He was born in Ireland, but neither ethnically nor culturally Irish. Zacwill (talk) 02:35, 31 December 2015 (UTC)
Please don't start; as I say, it's all been said in the archives, many times over. -- Elphion (talk) 13:08, 31 December 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 23 January 2016[edit]

Belfast is not part of Ireland. It is part of Northern Ireland. Blondie6990 (talk) 05:03, 23 January 2016 (UTC)

X mark.svg Not done. There was no "Northern Ireland" when Lewis was born. Belfast was in the "Ireland" portion of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. See the last of the boxes at the top of this page. Deor (talk) 07:52, 23 January 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to 2 external links on C. S. Lewis. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

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N Archived sources still need to be checked

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Dubious reference[edit]

I removed this sentence: "A major study from 1983 compared Lewis' ideal of gender relations to underground male prostitution rings, which share the same quality of men seeking to dominate subjects considered as less likely to take on submissive roles by a patriarchal society, while promoting the theatrical mockery of women." ref: Andy J. Johnson, Religion and Men's Violence Against Women, p. 37.

Page 37 of the cited work contains only a passing reference to Marilyn Frye's "analysis of Lewis's Christian fiction", citing The Politics of Reality (this can be found by searching the book for Lewis at Google Books). The Politics of Reality (which is borrowable from the Open Library) does not contain an analysis of Lewis's work or even a mention of him so far as I could see. Unless someone can find an actual reference for this rather esoteric interpretation it should not be included in the article. --- Robina Fox (talk) 06:14, 6 February 2016 (UTC)