Talk:Canaanite languages

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Ani vs. Anoki[edit]

As opposed to the comment, as I recall, both Ani and Anoki are common Afro-Asiatic pronouns, with different theories as to why there would be two different 1st person pronouns (gender, etc). Canaanite using 'Anoki', except for Mishnaic (and later) Hebrew borrowing Ani from Aramaic. That is, 'ana/i' would be less of a AfroAsiatic 'retention'.

Ok, I'ved removed the this is a common retention from proto-Afro-Asiatic., both Ani and Anoki as present in proto-afro-asiatics, I don't remember specific non-semitic AfroAsiatics with either. There's several theories about the use, I think the popular one assumes them to be used for different gendered, but with no hard-evidence, ie, no recorded or spoken language that has both pronounes at the same period

Philistine[edit]

I added a (?) after Philistine. Its genetic relationship to other languages is far from certain. Imperial78

The one who added Philistine here had with no doubt a very bad reason for doing so. There are people with POV who try to make fictional historical connection between Philistinians and present days Arabic Palestinians. Almost all of the articles that connected to this isuue are stricken by this POV and it goes well as there is no one to harshly supervise these aritcles quality. The origins of Philistine and Philistinians were European, not Semitic. There is no difference in counting Philistine as Canaanite than in counting French or English as ones.

Hebrew was used continuously[edit]

Hebrew was used continuously[edit]

I appreciate the various links to the substrata of Hebrew but there is an opinion here, repeated thrice, that is in my view is incorrect.

Just because Hebrew has had a rich life doesn't mean that it requiref any revival from the dead.

It has been in continuous use. Period. It is a Canaanite language THAT NEVER WENT OUT OF USE.

Has it been used slightly differently in various times and places. Sure. But these are less different than is the English in Shakespeare, the English of The American Constitution and the English of Modern Manchester.

It is the same Hebrew and WAS ALWAYS in use as a written language, a read language, and in many times and many places and to various degrees a spoken language.

Israeli Hebrew is not a son of a 1000 BCE Canaanite language. It IS one and all of its ancient writings now discovered would have been easily understood by thousands of Jews at any point over the past 3,000 years.