Talk:Cancer

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Former good article Cancer was one of the Natural sciences good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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To Maintaining Low Blood Sugar as a New Cancer Treatment[edit]

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Evilstriver (talkcontribs) 08:21, 23 September 2009‎

Addition[edit]

I'd like to add the possibility of exercise as adjunct therapy, and the role of p27 in colorectal cancer. Can I have access edit this page? Thank you. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Edward Tong (talkcontribs) 16:48, 5 February 2015 (UTC)

You already have access. The requirement is that your account be more than four days old, and that you have saved 10 edits (to any page). WhatamIdoing (talk) 18:12, 2 May 2015 (UTC)
He worked that out, & did lots of edits to Colorectal cancer in Feb, before disappearing. I'd question if some of the copyediting improves the language. [1] Johnbod (talk) 21:13, 2 May 2015 (UTC)

Reference 5 is not the cause of reference 1[edit]

The infectious causes of cancer are not associated to changing the genes in the host cells. These two statements should not be linked.

  Bfpage |leave a message  23:28, 19 May 2015 (UTC)
Are you sure? But the chapter in the ref doesn't seem to cover this - pp. 107, 110 etc seem more relevant. Johnbod (talk) 23:42, 19 May 2015 (UTC)
I'm pretty certain. The mechanism through which infection causes cancer is through (decades of) inflammation. But I will have to get all my references in order to make a precise, non-controversial change to this highly visible and highly read article. Just for starters, see Infectious causes of cancer, Oncovirus, List of oncogenic bacteria, not to mention the category "Infectious causes of cancer" which ties all the viruses, bacteria and even tapeworms together that are adequately referenced to causing infections that become cancerous. The higher the phyla, the more likely that inflammation from the infection causes the cancer, NOT genetic changes.
  Bfpage |leave a message  01:36, 20 May 2015 (UTC)
Well I won't use WP as my reference, thanks. What the WCR says (p. 107) is: ""chronic inflammation is associated with DNA and tissue damage, including genetic and epigenetic changes leading to cancer". Ref to PMID 21349092. Johnbod (talk) 03:24, 20 May 2015 (UTC)
Um, are we certain that oncoviruses all cause cancer through generalized inflammation rather than direct genetic changes? WhatamIdoing (talk) 04:15, 20 May 2015 (UTC)
I'm not at all (the WCR quote is from a section on "inflammation and cancer"), but the present article text does not assert this. The bits complained about don't mention it in fact. Johnbod (talk) 14:16, 20 May 2015 (UTC)

Gen manipulation[edit]

A single gen manipulation has stopped cancer development. Normally they're cells that organize our body. It has answered in mice. Study more here

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-06-gene-colorectal-cancer-cells-tissue.html?utm_source=nwletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=splt-item&utm_campaign=daily-nwletter

MansourJE (talk) 10:37 27 June 2015 (UTC)

@Mjesfahani: Are you suggesting that we include this in the article? Seems premature: this was a study in mice and we have no idea it if can be done in humans, let alone in other kinds of tumours. JFW | T@lk 13:35, 28 June 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 7 July 2015. Added to Causes->chemicals section[edit]

No thanks. Only change is "Research has found that a cocktail of fifty chemicals the public is exposed to on a daily basis may trigger cancer when combined. xref>University of Bath research, http://www.bath.ac.uk/research/news/2015/06/23/cocktail-of-chemicals-may-trigger-cancer/ http://www.bath.ac.uk/research/news/2015/06/23/cocktail-of-chemicals-may-trigger-cancer/</refx" - which does not meet WP:MEDRS. What about the published review though? See http://carcin.oxfordjournals.org/content/36/Suppl_1. Meanwhile, some of the existing refs on basic stuff really need replacing with more recent ones though. Johnbod (talk) 13:54, 7 July 2015 (UTC)

Chemicals[edit]

Further information: Alcohol and cancer and Smoking and cancer
The incidence of lung cancer is highly correlated with smoking.

Exposure to particular substances have been linked to specific types of cancer. These substances are called carcinogens. Tobacco smoking, for example, causes 90% of lung cancer.[1] It also causes cancer in the larynx, head, neck, stomach, bladder, kidney, esophagus and pancreas.[2] Tobacco smoke contains over fifty known carcinogens, including nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.[3] Tobacco is responsible for about one in three of all cancer deaths in the developed world,[4] and about one in five worldwide.[3] Lung cancer death rates in the United States have mirrored smoking patterns, with increases in smoking followed by dramatic increases in lung cancer death rates and, more recently, decreases in smoking rates since the 1950s followed by decreases in lung cancer death rates in men since 1990.[5][6]

In Western Europe, 10% of cancers in males and 3% of all cancers in females are attributed to alcohol exposure, especially cancer of the liver and of the digestive tract.[7] Cancer related to substance exposures at work is believed to represent between 2–20% of all cases.[8] Every year, at least 200,000 people die worldwide from cancer related to their workplaces.[9] Millions of workers run the risk of developing cancers such as lung cancer and mesothelioma from inhaling tobacco smoke or asbestos fibers on the job, or leukemia from exposure to benzene at their workplaces.[9]

Research has found that a cocktail of fifty chemicals the public is exposed to on a daily basis may trigger cancer when combined. [10]

Yuenkiepang (talk) 13:42, 7 July 2015 (UTC)

  1. ^ Biesalski HK, Bueno de Mesquita B, Chesson A, Chytil F, Grimble R, Hermus RJ, Köhrle J, Lotan R, Norpoth K, Pastorino U, Thurnham D (1998). "European Consensus Statement on Lung Cancer: risk factors and prevention. Lung Cancer Panel". CA Cancer J Clin 48 (3): 167–76; discussion 164–6. doi:10.3322/canjclin.48.3.167. PMID 9594919. 
  2. ^ Kuper H, Boffetta P, Adami HO (September 2002). "Tobacco use and cancer causation: association by tumour type". Journal of Internal Medicine 252 (3): 206–24. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2796.2002.01022.x. PMID 12270001. 
  3. ^ a b Kuper H, Adami HO, Boffetta P (June 2002). "Tobacco use, cancer causation and public health impact". Journal of Internal Medicine 251 (6): 455–66. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2796.2002.00993.x. PMID 12028500. 
  4. ^ Sasco AJ, Secretan MB, Straif K (August 2004). "Tobacco smoking and cancer: a brief review of recent epidemiological evidence". Lung Cancer. 45 Suppl 2: S3–9. doi:10.1016/j.lungcan.2004.07.998. PMID 15552776. 
  5. ^ Thun MJ, Jemal A (October 2006). "How much of the decrease in cancer death rates in the United States is attributable to reductions in tobacco smoking?". Tob Control 15 (5): 345–7. doi:10.1136/tc.2006.017749. PMC 2563648. PMID 16998161. 
  6. ^ Dubey S, Powell CA (May 2008). "Update in lung cancer 2007". Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 177 (9): 941–6. doi:10.1164/rccm.200801-107UP. PMC 2720127. PMID 18434333. 
  7. ^ Schütze M, Boeing H, Pischon T, Rehm J, Kehoe T, Gmel G, Olsen A, Tjønneland AM, Dahm CC, Overvad K, Clavel-Chapelon F, Boutron-Ruault MC, Trichopoulou A, Benetou V, Zylis D, Kaaks R, Rohrmann S, Palli D, Berrino F, Tumino R, Vineis P, Rodríguez L, Agudo A, Sánchez MJ, Dorronsoro M, Chirlaque MD, Barricarte A, Peeters PH, van Gils CH, Khaw KT, Wareham N, Allen NE, Key TJ, Boffetta P, Slimani N, Jenab M, Romaguera D, Wark PA, Riboli E, Bergmann MM (2011). "Alcohol attributable burden of incidence of cancer in eight European countries based on results from prospective cohort study". BMJ 342: d1584. doi:10.1136/bmj.d1584. PMC 3072472. PMID 21474525. 
  8. ^ Irigaray P, Newby JA, Clapp R, Hardell L, Howard V, Montagnier L, Epstein S, Belpomme D (December 2007). "Lifestyle-related factors and environmental agents causing cancer: an overview". Biomed. Pharmacother. 61 (10): 640–58. doi:10.1016/j.biopha.2007.10.006. PMID 18055160. 
  9. ^ a b "WHO calls for prevention of cancer through healthy workplaces" (Press release). World Health Organization. 27 April 2007. Retrieved 13 October 2007. 
  10. ^ University of Bath research, http://www.bath.ac.uk/research/news/2015/06/23/cocktail-of-chemicals-may-trigger-cancer/