Talk:Capsaicin

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Treatment after exposure - bleach[edit]

Chlorine Bleach is very effective at removing capsaicin from skin. The article is incorrect in stating that this is not the case. It is not recommended on a regular basis, due to possibly deleterious effects on the skin, but if discomfort is severe, relief is almost immediate. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 202.68.80.10 (talk) 22:58, 10 December 2012 (UTC)

Reliable sources, please. Qwyrxian (talk) 23:36, 10 December 2012 (UTC)

Try it and see for yourself. I have. The logic behind this is that chlorine binds with capcaicin to form a water soluble salt, which is then easily removed. Too, a simple search will reveal testimony many others with intimate knowledge of chilli handling who use this method successfully. See also the article "The taming of capsaicin. Reversal of the vanilloid activity of N-acylvanillamines by aromatic iodination" (J Med Chem. 2005 Jul 14;48(14):4663-9.) which mentions the effect (albeit with the acknowledgement that iodine and bromine are more effective).

Okay, first of all, I'm not pouring bleach on myself. Second of all, Wikipedia only cares what reliable sources say. If the only source is a single, first run research paper (i.e., not a review paper), that won't meet the strict requirements we have for sources for medical information. Qwyrxian (talk) 03:38, 12 December 2012 (UTC)

A hint: just put your arm exposed to capsaicin into cold water. Btw, I'm also not puring capsaicin on myself...but I'd have less problems with bleach since common bleaching solutions need minutes to react with your skin. --178.197.227.86 (talk) 15:37, 17 January 2014 (UTC)

On one hand, that sounds likely, but one ponders that capsaicin has time to irritate the stomach enough to produce additional gastric acid in an already HCL rich environment. Still, reaction time, mixing and exposure to HCL time, etc makes it something interesting to study.Wzrd1 (talk) 07:53, 3 June 2015 (UTC)

How is capsaicin metabolized?[edit]

I ate a lot of jalapeño peppers for a while, soon after this, my prostate and urethra began to burn. Now, anytime after I eat any hot ( capsaicin) foods, it starts to burn down there for a day or two. I can't find any other person who has ever experienced this reaction to capsaicin and my doctor would just think I'm crazy. I personally believe that the enzyme responsible for breaking down the capsaicin has been depleted in my body due to my sudden excessive intake of jalapeño peppers. Any information if you can find it would be great. I want to fix my pancreas or liver, or enzymes so I don't have to burn in my special place every time I eat capsaicin containing foods. 104.235.185.182 (talk) 10:03, 22 January 2016 (UTC)

Although your point is raised from a singular, personal experience, making it somewhat selective and likely unique to a minority of high-pepper consumers, it has value in pointing out a weakness in the article because the in vivo metabolism and fate of consuming capsaicin are not sufficiently addressed. So, thanks for raising this. I suspect there isn't better discussion in the article because nearly all of the metabolic work has been in vitro and in lab animals, as shown here, where it is stated "Rats fed 0.5 g/kg day-1 crude Capsicum Fruit Extract for 60 days exhibited no significant gross pathology at necropsy, but slight hyperemia of the liver and reddening of the gastric mucosa were observed. Weanling rats fed basal diets supplemented with whole red pepper at concentrations up to 5.0% for up to 8 weeks had no pathology of the large intestines, livers, and kidneys, but destruction of the taste buds and keratinization and erosion of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract were noted in groups fed 0.5% to 5.0% red pepper. The results of 9-and 12-month extension of this study showed normal large intestines and kidneys." Simply, high chronic pepper intake caused no major organ damage except in the mouth and esophagus.
This general article discusses the enzyme systems responsible for capsaicin metabolism, cytochrome P450, which are not likely to be depleted if you are generally healthy without a liver disorder (the Conclusion of that article is a good summary). In humans, high consumption is shown as 25-200 mg/day in Mexico and India where there may be a resultant increased cancer risk in vulnerable organs such as the upper digestive tract, whereas typical European intake of 1.5 mg/day had no effect on risk, according to this European Commission report. The University of Maryland has this general consumer guide. I doubt your apparent prostate and urethra sensitivity is irreversible, correctable by eating fewer meals with excessive capsaicin seasoning. Good luck. --Zefr (talk) 17:20, 22 January 2016 (UTC)

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Stomach cancer link[edit]

The article needs major attention vis a vis this longstanding (decades) medical controversy. Lewis Goudy (talk) 17:13, 1 September 2016 (UTC)

Not clear what you are inferring, Lewis Goudy. Perhaps you could draft a statement with source to state what you mean for the article. The content and sources under Research and pharmaceutical use are accurate and up to date per WP:MEDRS. Please read this if you are suggesting that capsaicin is an anti-cancer compound. There may be more recent literature so I will check that and possibly revise. --Zefr (talk) 18:09, 1 September 2016 (UTC)

There have been epidemiological studies suggesting that capsaicin is carcinogenic (stomach and gall bladder). eg http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12208187 Some suggest that contaminants such as aflatoxin are involved. This is the study that raised the issue: http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/139/3/263.short Lewis Goudy (talk) 13:39, 4 September 2016 (UTC)

we need a literature review or a statement by a major governmental/scientific authority to add that - please see WP:MEDRS Jytdog (talk) 21:29, 5 September 2016 (UTC)

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Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 19:35, 14 November 2016 (UTC)

Ok, but duplicate in EL. --Zefr (talk) 20:27, 14 November 2016 (UTC)