Talk:Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress

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Powers of the chairman[edit]

The article incorrectly states that "The position holds reserve constitutional powers under the 1978 revision of the Constitution of the People's Republic of China. As stipulated in Article 84 of the Constitution, should both the President and Vice-President become incapacitated, and the National People's Congress is unable to elect a timely replacement, the Chairman of the NPC will act as President." There is no Article 84 in the 1978 Constitution, the quote is from the 1982 Constitution. Such a stipulation would make no sense in the 1978 Constitution because it does not have a President. To repeat a point I've made elsewhere, the position of national chairman or president was created in the Constitution of 1954 and abolished in the Constitution of 1975. There was thereafter no president in China until the position was created, or recreated, in the 1982 Constitution. Rgr09 (talk) 02:07, 31 May 2013 (UTC)

Head of state[edit]

without citing any supporting texts, the article states that the 1975 and 1978 Constitutions designate the Chairman as the head of state. I can find no reference to head of state in either Constitution. The only mention of the Chairman of the Standing Committee in the 1975 Constitution is in Article 18:

The Standing Committee of the National People's Congress is the permanent organ of the National People's Congress. Its functions and powers are: to convene the sessions of the National People's Congress, interpret laws, enact decrees, dispatch and recall plenipotentiary representatives abroad, receive foreign diplomatic envoys, ratify and denounce treaties concluded with foreign states, and exercise such other functions and powers as are vested in it by the National People's Congress.
The Standing Committee of the National People's Congress is composed of the Chairman, the Vice Chairmen and other members, all of whom are elected and subject to recall by the National People's Congress.

I fail to see how this designates the Chairman as head of state. The 1978 Constitution is not quite so short; Article 25 enumerates 13 powers of the Standing Committee, and Article 26 describes the position of the Standing Committee's Chairman as follows:

The Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress presides over the work of the Standing Committee; receives foreign diplomatic envoys; and in accordance with the decisions of the National People's Congress or its Standing Committee promulgates laws and decrees, dispatches and recalls plenipotentiary representatives abroad, ratifies treaties concluded with foreign states and confers state titles of honour.

The 1982 Constitution delegates some of these powers to the President, who various Chinese sources do refer to as head of state, but again the wording of the 1978 Constitution does not seem to support the claim that the Chairman of the Standing Committee was the head of state. Please explain how these sources support this claim, or provide other sources. Rgr09 (talk) 00:50, 10 November 2013 (UTC)

Title: Chairman of NPC or of its Standing Committee[edit]

Recently, the Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress was moved to the Chairman of the National People's Congress twice (this and this). However, the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress is different from the National People's Congress itself. And it's technically incorrect to say that the Chairman of the Standing Committee is the Chairman of the NPC. If the article title is moved to a shorter version, it has to be proven that the shorter one is the more common usage. But there is no evidence to show that the shorter version is the more common name. Since Google is blocked in China, I use Bing search and find that "Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress" has 1,220,000 results while "Chairman of the National People's Congress" has only 3 results. Therefore the title should be Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress. --Neo-Jay (talk) 12:48, 9 July 2015 (UTC)

No its not, those examples are very correct.. The official title is General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, but its titled General Secretary of the Communist Party of China.. The offical title is Standing Committee of the Political Bureau, but the article is titled Politburo Standing Committee.. The official name is Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China Central Committee, but its titled Politburo of the Communist Party of China.. The official title is Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National Assembly of Vietnam, but the article is titled Chairman of the National Assembly of Vietnam... Do you're homework. Stop this idiocy! .. Secondly, this is English WP and reflects English writing (not Chinese). --TIAYN (talk) 07:42, 10 July 2015 (UTC)
@Trust Is All You Need: Do your own homework, please! All the examples you provided above might be that the shorter name is the more commonly used one. But could you please show me the evidence that Chairman of the National People's Congress is more commonly used than Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress? I searched for these two terms in English by Bing search and found that they were 3 results vs. 1,220,000 results, and by Yahoo search, 136,000 vs. 1,210,000 (again, in English). According to Wikipedia:Article titles, Wikipedia prefers "the name that is most commonly used", not the name that is shorter. In this case, the longer and official name, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, is the more commonly used name and should be used. --Neo-Jay (talk) 10:36, 10 July 2015 (UTC)
For what it's worth, I got 252,000 results on google for "Chairman of the National People's Congress". Moreover, it is true that "Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress" is the official name, which is why you have so many results, since that string is used by Xinhua, CCTV etc. When it comes to Chinese politics, brevity is probably better. For example "United Front Work Department" rather than "United Front Department of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China". Colipon+(Talk) 12:11, 10 July 2015 (UTC)
I would prefer that the article title remain "Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress" for several reasons. 1) It is the official English title, which counts for something, just as the official nature of the title "President" of the People's Republic of China counts for something. 2) If we did use a different title, we would have to explain why, just as the title of the PRC "President" is explained. The proposed (or now de facto) article title is inconsistent with the very first sentence of the article, which still begins "The Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress." If the new title stay, this inconsistency will have to be noted and justified, here and in many, many other places, and will produce the same confusion that "President" has provoked among both editors and readers. 3) After describing the rationale of using "President" of the NPC, the articles dealing with that position do not suffer greatly in describing the position. But in describing the functioning of both the NPC Standing Committee and the NPC itself, the name NPC Chairman will, in my view, generate serious confusion in readers about what the position actually involves. It's hard enough explaining the position as it is.
Or is the proposal that the title be NPC Chairman, and the article continue to use the title "Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress? I object to such out and out inconsistency; what's the point? Why? Rgr09 (talk) 14:04, 10 July 2015 (UTC)