Talk:Chapter book

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SLJ's Top 100 Chapter Books[edit]

WARNING. There are only two SLJ Top 100 lists. The "chapter books" are identical to the "children's novels". Evidently the name was revised during July/August, possibly because other people reacted as I did, Preserved here.

Top 100 poll results, School Library Journal, A Fuse 8 Production (slj.com/afuse8production):

Perhaps the Children's Novels and Picture Books are available only as PDF and by request. (Hint: "The Top 100 Lists Are Nigh. Nigh, I Say! Nigh!", Elizabeth Bird, 2012-08-15.)

Apparently Bird covered each of the 100 chapter books in its own blogpost May 15 to July 2. I recognize most of the first 25 and I would call every one of those a children's novel. -- books intended for older readers or middle grades in contrast to young adults -- whereas chapter books are books for younger readers, newly independent readers, [which happen to be] long enough for layout in chapters.

So I wonder what is a children's novel per Elizabeth Bird. Is it something more advanced, even a young-adult novel? And I wonder whether School Library Journal anyway endorses the rough classification implicit in these three polls. And, if so, how do librarians, publishers, and booksellers use these terms if/when they do? Does this list of chapter books fit the term as commonly used by any of those experts?

--P64 (talk) 21:44, 28 May 2013 (UTC)

WARNING. There are only two SLJ Top 100 lists. The "chapter books" are identical to the "children's novels". Evidently the name was revised during July/August, possibly because other people reacted as I did, preserved here.
--P64 (talk) 21:55, 28 May 2013 (UTC)
This is how Betsy Bird finally described each category at the head of its fancy poster:
"Stretching the definition of what constitutes a 'picture book' to include everything from board books to easy titles ..." --SLJ's Top 100 Picture Books
"Considering only fictional titles for children between the ages of 9–12 ..." --SLJ's Top 100 Children's Novels
--P64 (talk) 16:45, 13 June 2013 (UTC)