Talk:Chinese New Year

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Chinese New Year is not observed in non-Chinese civilizations[edit]

Please provide evidence that Chinese New Year is observed in non-Chinese civilizations in East Asia. Its observance by overseas Chinese don't count.

Please provide evidence that Chinese New Year is public holiday in Japan, Korea, Vietnam. —Preceding unsigned comment added by VeryGoodBoy (talkcontribs) 22:35, 8 October 2008 (UTC)

Please do not mark the whole article as having problems just because you don't think the holiday is "observed" (whatever that exactly means?) in 3 countries. The overseas celebration should count. Maybe what you are looking for is an equivalent to something such as Christmas worldwide. Benjwong (talk) 00:06, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
There is Lunar New Year. This article says Chinese New Year is celebrated in Korea, Japan, Vietnam. It also says Chinese New Year is public holiday in those countries. Then what happened to Korean New Year, Vietnamese New Year, Japanese New Year? Are they no longer celebrated and no longer a public holiday in those countries? VeryGoodBoy (talk) 00:48, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

According to evidence provided by Angelo_De_La_Paz, Chinese New Year is celebrated in China, Southeast Asia, and Chinese communities worldwide. For other countries, Lunar New Year or New Year is used.

The Spring Festival is China's major traditional holiday, and is also celebrated in other parts of Southeast Asia, including Vietnam (where New Year's Day is called "Tet"), Malaysia, Taiwan, and of course, Hong Kong.[1]

Millions across Asia have begun celebrating the Chinese New Year - the biggest holiday for Chinese communities worldwide.[2]

Elsewhere in the region, the New Year period is also significant. Malaysia's capital Kuala Lumpur has been lit by lanterns and banners festooning buildings, despite the fact the Chinese only make up 30% of the population. In Vietnam, the New Year festival is also celebrated in style.[3] China and many other East Asian countries like Vietnam, Korea and Mongolia will celebrate the lunar New Year on February 7.[4] VeryGoodBoy (talk) 01:36, 9 October 2008 (UTC)


Angelo_De_La_Paz has used three sources to claim that Chinese New Year strongly influence new years in other countries, but those sources say nothing about any influence. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 01:47, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

This site[5] says Lunar New Year is also known as Chinese New Year in other places. This does not mean Korean New Year is the same as Chinese New Year. This issue is resolved through the disambiguation page, Lunar New Year. This site[6] says New Year festival is celebrated in Vietnam, not Chinese New Year. Also, this is just a website. Korean dictionaries and encyclopedia treat Korean New Year and Chinese New Year as different celebrations. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 02:11, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

This site[7] is about Lunar New Year and says that Vietnam and Korea have their own celebrations, which means celebrations different from Chinese New Year are celebrated in those countries. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 02:17, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

I am certain many places celebrate it around the world. Some people do it for fun. Is really not that big deal. Your issue is not whether people celebrate it. But whether other culture's lunar new year = chinese new year. The answer is probably no. Benjwong (talk) 03:11, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
Thank you for the comment. I feel Angelo_De_La_Paz's view that lunar new year in other cultures are same as the Chinese new year is ignorant and lacks respect for cultural diversity. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 03:24, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
If it's a holiday that was exported and absorbed, then it's a variant of Chinese New Year, so indded, if Angelo is saying that Chinese New Year is/was celebrated... he is in many ways correct. If as Very says, that they are different, that is also correct, because cultural assimilation results in different traditions having evolved. If they are separate, then there should be a Japanese Christmas, since it's a (female) Santa Claus and gift giving holiday, and not a Christian one. If they are intricately related, and descendant from the Chinese one, then it should be mentioned here. 70.51.10.188 (talk) 04:17, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
New year is celebrated around the world, mostly in cultures with yearly calendars. Lunisolar calendars are one of them, and because most traditional calendars in East Asia are based on the Chinese lunisolar calendar, new year celebrations are held in generally the same day. But this cannot be evidence to common origin of these different lunar new year celebrations. Korea's Naver Encyclopedia[8] clarifies country of origin in all articles on imoprted culture. There is no mention of China in the article on Korean New Year, and Chinese New Year is treated as a separate subject. As a Korean, Chinese New Year is very foreign to me. And when Blizzard prepared an event in Korean World of Warcraft based on the Chinese New Year and introduced it to Koreans as Korean New Year, the Korean players noticed the obvious differences in its customs and were very angry at Blizzard's ignorance. After unceasing protests and boycott of the event, Blizzard changed the name from Korean New Year to a generic term, New Year. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 04:49, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

Let's clarify here. Chinese New Year is celebrated basically anywhere there is a sizable ethnic Chinese community, which is to say, it is celebrated more or less all over the world.[9] Exactly who celebrates it is another matter. Honestly, go ahead and play with the wording so as not to step on anybody's ethnic toes, like so many articles that touch upon identity politics. This is such a trivial matter in my opinion, since there are already individual articles for how lunar new year is celebrated in the relevant cultures. Hong Qi Gong (Talk - Contribs) 13:36, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

It is my understanding the the term "Chinese New Year" is the accepted term for any lunar new year that occurs at around the time that the Chinese one does. Is it fair? I don't know, probably not. But I feel that is the accepted usage. I'll go see if I can get some citations for my opinion. Also, as a side note, you guys might want to note the discussion at Talk:British Isles where the same thing happened (common usage of the term pissed off people from Ireland, but it is the common usage so it stayed. However, the lead talk about how different countries view the term).LedRush (talk) 14:28, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
Canada gov't site uses "Chinese New Year" for all lunar years: http://www42.statcan.ca/smr08/smr08_102-eng.htm
American University does the same: http://lanecc.libguides.com/content.php?pid=5173
Poland seems to do the same: http://www.krakowpost.com/articles/2008/02/21/1017.html
I realize these are by no means conclusive...just some small evidence.LedRush (talk) 14:39, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
What it comes down to, as it always does when identity politics comes into play in article editing, is what wording and titles to use. In my mind, the different ways that Lunar New Year is celebrated in different cultures is significant enough that we have seperate articles - which is currently the case. There's not exactly an authoritative source to decide that the common name for Lunar New Year is Chinese New Year, unless you want to do the research to figure out how most governments around the world name it. One issue that may be relevant is whether or not there's a common origin, or if Lunar New Year as it is celebrated in China had influenced the celebrations in other countries - and I think this is a claim that needs to be sourced, or otherwise be excluded from the article. Hong Qi Gong (Talk - Contribs) 17:02, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

I agree with Hong Qi Gong. Chinese New Year became more familiar to people around the world due to widespread Chinese dispora. In sources that specifically deal with lunar lew year, Chinese is carefully avoided and replaced with a generic term when referring to lunar new years celebrated in other countries. In the Smithsonian magazine for example[10], it commonly uses Chinese New Year, but when referring to those that are celebrated in East Asia, is uses lunar New Year. In BBC News[11], Chinese is again carefully avoided and replaced with New Year. It's understandable for Chinese New Year to be celebrated in Southeast Asia maybe even Vietnam, because of sizable Chinese dispora in that region. But in Korea and Japan, Chinese dispora is not very large, so there aren't many Chinese to celebrate Chinese New Year, so there is no reason for those countries to make Chinese New Year a public holiday. Please check demographic table of Overseas Chinese provided by Hong Qi Gong and cross reference it with the table of coutnries where the article claims Chinese New Year is a public holiday. In Malaysia, there is 6 million Chinese, 2.6 million in Singapore, 100,000 out of 381,371 in Brunei, 1.2 million in Vietnam. In Japan, there is 519,561 out of 127 million, and in South Korea, there is 30,000 out of 49 million. The articel says Chinese New Year is observed as a public holiday in a number of countries and territories where a sizable Chinese population resides. Isn't it self contradictory that Japan and South Korea are included when they don't have a sizable Chinese population? VeryGoodBoy (talk) 21:38, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

Chinese New Year is 'celebrated' in Australia in that ethnic Chinese have celebrated Chinese New Year for years (see media archives of major Australian newspapers: The Age and The Australian) and in more recent years, Australians have been joining in. This does not make it an 'Australian' event. Chinese New Year is celebrated by Chinese people. That local populations in Asia also partake does not make it Asian New Year. See the Christmas analogy. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.250.5.247 (talkcontribs) 04:57, 18 February 2011

Chinese calendar was the official calendar that the Chinese emperors bequeathed to their main tributary states, namely Vietnam, Korea, Ryukyu Kingdom (modern Okinawa) and indirectly Japan. Therefore, Chinese New Year, or better qualified as “Chinese Calendar New Year”, was also those nation's official new year, until Japan did away its feudal vestige by jumping on Western calendar bandwagon in late 1800's and the same for the others, including mainland China, in the 20th century. With that said, calling this Chinese (Calendar) New Year is correct, as it only signifies the origin of this unit term, rather than national or cultural possession. Similarly, familiar colloquial terms such as "English metrics system", "BTU (British Thermo Unit)", heck, even the language "English" itself , are spoken in the US without cultural or national sovereignty baggage. Again, designating this holiday as Chinese New Year is just showing its true origin in a calendar different from Gregorian or Julian calendars that are prevalent in the West.

East Asian New Year[edit]

A solution could be formulating a new article at East Asian New Year that documents descent from the Chinese calendar and celebration, through diffusion to the rest of East Asia, and the similarities and differences between them. 70.51.10.188 (talk) 04:26, 9 October 2008 (UTC)

There is already a disambiguation page for Lunar New Year, and claiming descent and diffusion from Chinese New Year is a dubious and ignorant claim. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 04:49, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
Calling other people ignorant usually doesn't score you any points.LedRush (talk) 14:29, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
I'm saying the claim is ignorant, not the person. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 21:41, 9 October 2008 (UTC)
A. the calendar is based on the Chinese one
B. the date is based on the Chinese one
That clearly indicated descent from the Chinese one. How much has descended versus how much was locally developed is not the same thing as not having descent. Your statement "because most traditional calendars in East Asia are based on the Chinese lunisolar calendar, new year celebrations are held in generally the same day" shows descent. 70.51.10.188 (talk) 03:20, 11 October 2008 (UTC)
I don't see that as a basis to claim descent. Those cultures may have had different calendars before adopting the Chinese calendar, and the tradition of celebrating the new year is much more than a specific type of calendar. For instance, the Japanese traditionally used a lunisolar calendar based on the Chinese calendar, but they have switched to the Gregorian calendar and started celebrating new year based on that calendar. Based on your argument, the tradition of Japanese New Year should have ended after adopting the Gregorian calendar, and current Japanese New Year should be descended from Italian New Year because the Gregorian calendar was developed in Italy. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 06:55, 11 October 2008 (UTC)
I don't think it is a good idea. "East Asian New Year" is not a common term in English. If there are disputes over whether Chinese New Year is celebrated outside of Chinese speaking countries, then just put in [dubious ] tag until reliable sources are cited. If reliable sources are not provided, then we can remove these assertions altogether.
In this case, I am curious why User:Angelo_De_La_Paz isn't participating in this discussion since this user is making these assertions and should be backing up the assertions with reliable sources.--pyl (talk) 07:00, 11 October 2008 (UTC)

As a Thai, I won't mind that much when the article claims that Spring Festival or Chinese New Year is celebrated in Thailand, as the overseas Chinese community in Thailand and the Thai-Chinese do celebrate it. Other Thais join the fun, too. But traditionally the Thai New Year, or Songkran, is celebrated in April, as a different festival. I am more surprised at the fact the no protest seems to have been made over the article's claim that the Chinese Festival is celebrated in "other countries" outside China, including "Taiwan" !!! Oh-oh... So Taiwan is another country apart from China? What do you think, my PRC friends out there? And my Taiwanese friends? 122.0.3.123 (talk) 10:31, 12 February 2010 (UTC) APRT

Where Chinese New Year is celebrated and designated a public holiday[edit]

Three sources provided by Angelo_De_La_Paz say Chinese New Year is celebrated in China, Southeast Asia, and Chinese communities worldwide. Generic terms such as New Year or Lunar New Year is used for other countries such as Korea, Japan, Vietnam, with one exception where Vietnam is included in Southeast Asia. Disambiguation for new year celebrations in those countries are provided in Lunar New Year.

Proposal 1 - Change Observed by Mainly East Asia countries with various local names. to Observed by China and Overseas Chinese[12][13] or Observed by China and Southeast Asia.[14] I favor Overseas Chinese because this is mostly true in Southeast Asian countries where sizable overseas Chinese reside, and this can also apply to other Chinese communities around the world.

Proposal 2 - Remove Korea, Japan, Vietnam in table of countries where Chinese New Year is celebrated. Southeast Asian countries designated Chinese New Year a public holiday because of sizable overseas Chinese in that region. But in Korea, Japan, Vietnam where overseas Chinese population is relatively small, their own local traditional new year celebrations are designated as a public holiday.

I think these changes are reasonable and fair, and references are provided. I'll make these changes once protection is removed, but if you feel opposed to these changes, please let me know. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 17:08, 11 October 2008 (UTC)

  • Oppose - Neither option recognizes the facts as cited above.LedRush (talk) 15:25, 12 October 2008 (UTC)
Those facts are well handled by Lunar New Year, where possible usages of these terms, including Chinese New Year, are disambiguated. Please see my response below yours. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 22:15, 12 October 2008 (UTC)

I have a different approach to this:-

  1. Source no 1 is from the BBC. It says "Millions across Asia have begun celebrating the Chinese New Year - the biggest holiday for Chinese communities worldwide."
  2. Source no 2 is from "Smithsonian.com". Who are they?
  3. I don't think source no 3 is reliable. It is from about.com, and I don't think it has an established reputation in this field of knowledge. I think it also made a factual error. Vietnam's lunar near year doesn't fall on the same day as the Chinese lunar new year.

So far the only reliable source established that the Chinese New Year is celebrated in the Chinese communities worldwide. No assertions for other communities / countries can be made as there are no reliable sources.--pyl (talk) 15:49, 12 October 2008 (UTC)

vietnamese new year DOES fall on the same day, most of the time, except with extremely rare exceptions Breaistwrote (talk) 22:17, 22 May 2009 (UTC)

Smithsonian.com expands on Smithsonian magazine's in-depth coverage of history, science, nature, the arts, travel, world culture and technology. I think its publisher, the Smithsonian Institution, has established reputation. I agree that about.com is not reliable. I won't oppose an alternate proposal for using Chinese communities world wide however. VeryGoodBoy (talk) 22:15, 12 October 2008 (UTC)


Spring Festival[edit]

In China, English-speaking chinese people always refer to this as "Spring Festival" ( even though it is in mid-winter ), and if you ask them about "chinese new year", they don't even know what you are talking about. This article should probably mention that it is called "spring festival" in China.Eregli bob (talk) 11:16, 28 November 2008 (UTC)

Well, the funny thing is, until this edit [15] on 28 August this year, it did list "Spring Festival" as an alternative term. Somehow Wikipedia seems doomed to repeat itself. Something starts out OK, then someone vandalises, tidies up, removes POV etc., and presto, something that was OK is changed. Then a few months later someone else comes along and says "Hey, why isn't this there?" So they put it in until someone else comes along and decides it isn't necessary...
I would say the original wording (mentioning "Spring Festival") was fine. But who am I to say?
Bathrobe (talk) 15:19, 28 November 2008 (UTC)
農曆新年 is the most original term from people I have asked. If you talk to old people, the reason why spring festival 春節 became the normal term in China is because the post-1949 government was against the old Chinese calendar 農曆 concept at one time. As part of the "New China" philosophy you just don't say 農曆新年. Good luck finding sources on this. Benjwong (talk) 07:22, 16 December 2008 (UTC)

Romanization of Cantonese[edit]

Cantonese is not romanized according to Jyutping or Yale in this article. Instead, it is romanized phonetically. I suggest Jyutping be used for romanization, just as Pinyin is used for the Mandarin pronunciations. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Javalava14 (talkcontribs) 2009-01-13T03:42:07

Is it even called Chinese New Year?[edit]

I've only heard the term "Chinese New Year" in the west. During my time spent in mainland China and East Asia, I've always heard it referred to as "Lunar New Year." The Chinese in China themselves refer to the holiday as either Lunar New Year or the Lunar Spring Festival. Intranetusa (talk) 21:47, 25 January 2009 (UTC)

Not locally. But I'd imagine every culture typically call its own traditional New Year just "New Year". My parents (who were born in Southern China) called it "Agrarian" Calendar New Year to distinguish it from the New calendar (Gregorian) New Year. You'll probably find several different names for this since the Chinese culture is very diverse. --Tesscass (talk) 17:34, 26 January 2009 (UTC)
I called my father-in-law (a Chinese national in China). After I told him "happy new year" in Chinese, he responded with "Happy Chinese New Year" in English. I thought it was a little funny, but it is widely regarded as "Chinese New Year" when speaking in English.LedRush (talk) 17:39, 26 January 2009 (UTC)
Americans don't call American football American football but internationally it's called American football. "Lunar New Year", "Agrarian Calendar New Year" and "Spring Festival" all suffer technical issues once you're outside Asia or China. HkCaGu (talk) 17:45, 26 January 2009 (UTC)

At least in Thailand, it is called"Chinese New Year", Trut Chiin, by the Thais in Thai language. 122.0.3.123 (talk) 05:06, 8 March 2010 (UTC)thaivisitor

When does it start, exactly?[edit]

I can't seem to find (in this article or anywhere else) when the official start of the first day takes place. Does it start in the entire world at the same time? Does it start an hour later if you're a timezone earlier? Heck, is "new moon" a global effect or does the perception of the moon vary from country to country? With these questions answered the article would be more complete, at least. --MooNFisH (talk) 10:07, 26 January 2009 (UTC)


See Chinese calendar. The astronomical new moon occurs at the same instant throughout the world when the ecliptic longitude of the Moon and Sun are the same as viewed from the center of the Earth. The Sun appears to move slowly along the ecliptic toward the east, while the Moon appears to move rapidly along the ecliptic toward the east as much as 5° north or south of it. The astronomical new moon occurs when the Moon overtakes the Sun. The time of this astronomical new moon relative to midnight in the Chinese time zone determines the Gregorian date of the traditional Chinese New Year, which is then used throughout the world as its date. — Joe Kress (talk) 18:43, 26 January 2009 (UTC)
Yes, do add a calendar onto this page, for the exact dates for the current year. The German language wikipedia page has a very nice list that you could re-use for this. See: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinesisches_Neujahrsfest#Datum 83.79.141.170 (talk) 20:32, 28 January 2009 (UTC)
Now that you mention it, there used to be a table in the section "New Year dates". Someone removed it. --Tesscass (talk) 21:08, 28 January 2009 (UTC)

Not Chinese New Year but Lunar New Year[edit]

Chinese new year is merely used in China. In fact,many asian countries have Lunar New year because they use Lunar Calender so this spring festival should be only Lunar New Year, not Chinese one (if the purpose to say internationally) and it isn't fair to say so ( almost means of mass media use this word). The word chinese itself shows that it only in China, but there's no proof that it originated in China. In Vietnam, we call it "Tet holiday", which means we also have our spring festival. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 58.186.98.167 (talk) 09:38, 27 January 2009 (UTC)

If you were looking for Tet, then maybe you should have... looked for Tet. Please see Tết. Hong Qi Gong (Talk - Contribs) 12:18, 27 January 2009 (UTC)
It's not Lunar New Year because in a lunar calendar, any month can be the First Month. All these cultures that use a lunar calendar have different months to begin the year, and that's why it is internationally incorrect to say Lunar New Year. HkCaGu (talk) 18:58, 27 January 2009 (UTC)
Luner New Year is not precise. Different luner calenders are used in different places in the world. Chinese New Year refers to one specific lunersolar calender used in East Asia. Celebration customs may differ from country to country, and from province to province. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.91.150.14 (talk) 22:12, 23 August 2009 (UTC)
Also, note that the term Chinese New Year is also widely used in Malaysia and Singapore. Therefore, the word "Chinese" does not only refer to China although the tradition may originate from China. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Nezs (talkcontribs) 12:52, 15 February 2010 (UTC)

Haha, Vietnamese year Tet is just a transliteration of Chinese 元旦节. Before west calender was introduced to China, Chinese new year was called 元旦节, but now the west year is called 元旦节.--刻意(Kèyì) 15:59, 1 February 2011 (UTC)

Is it possible to add simple table of dates for each year?[edit]

It would be very useful if someone, if they know how, could construct a simple table of the new year dates for each year. An example for Christian Easter is at Easter#Date of Easter.--212.183.140.53 (talk) 19:46, 31 January 2010 (UTC)

Such a table is already provided under Dates, where each New Year date is related to its animal and branch. But it does not separate the year from the date within the year, which, if done, would result in a very short twelve year list. I'm clarifying that these are New Year dates. — Joe Kress (talk) 20:07, 31 January 2010 (UTC)

Adding new external link.[edit]

{{editsemiprotected}}

Hi, under ==External links==, can someone put in this link. Its to an image gallery featuring images of the 2009 new year celebrations in Hong Kong.

The link should go something like this:

That should do it.

Thanks and cheers - Rogan Coles--Tingyat (talk) 06:59, 6 February 2010 (UTC)

We already have three extlinks; can't see why we need this. Pmlineditor  12:45, 6 February 2010 (UTC)

Pronunciation Audio[edit]

Just a suggestion - audio with Mandarin and Cantonese pronunciation of key phrases and greetings could be a useful addition to this article. -- Rob.au (talk) 09:43, 12 February 2010 (UTC)

Public holiday in Indonesia[edit]

Under the table of public holidays, the article states that the first day of CNY is celebrated in Brunei and Indonesia and that if the first day is Sunday, it is carried over to Monday. This situation has arisen this year (2010), but the public holiday has not been carried over (I am an Indonesian resident). This is consistent with the approach taken to all public holidays in Indonesia - ie there is no "crediting" if they happen to fall on a week end. However I am not certain of the position in Brunei.

Sjmawson (talk) 07:56, 15 February 2010 (UTC)

Festivities: Preceding Day (CNY eve)[edit]

I wish to propose adding some cultural practices under "Preceding Days" in Festivities.

In Malaysia and Singapore, the Chinese community creates a makeshift altar in front of the house and welcome the God of Prosperity[1]. There are certain time and direction where the alter must face[1]. It is belief that if the God of Prosperity chooses to enter one's house[1], the members of the house will benefit good health, good business, etc. It is also belief that during the "welcoming" duration, the doors should be left opened.

Part of a traditional Chinese New Year song depicts the same practice (rough translation into English)[2]:

"The sound of drums"

"A new spring has arrived, everyone is happy"

"Fireworks are going off in all directions"

"Inviting the God of Prosperity to our Doors"

Notes:
[1] http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2010/2/14/focus/5669550&sec=focus
[2] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bjjUm593v4 - a modern day rap mixed with several traditional songs.

Nezs (talk) 13:27, 15 February 2010 (UTC)

Chinese Spring Festival as public holiday[edit]

Chinese spring festival is also a public holiday in Mauritius. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 197.224.11.92 (talk) 07:28, 30 January 2011 (UTC)

Yes, just verified that Mauritius does indeed have a public holiday for the Lunar New Year. Sources: http://www.tourism-mauritius.mu/Plan/public-holidays.html and http://mauritius.usembassy.gov/holidays.html. I will add this entry to the table of Public Holidays. —Molly-in-md (talk) 11:44, 19 February 2015 (UTC)

Chinese Zodiac and New year[edit]

Traditionally, Chinese zodiac (shengxiao) is based on 24 Jieqi, start from the day of lichun, not the Chinese new year. This is usually confused by some modern ppl.--刻意(Kèyì) 02:24, 2 February 2011 (UTC)

Chinese Greetings[edit]

This article should also explain the different Chinese New Year greetings. I'm not Chinese but whenever I go outside or watch TV, there are different greeting calls for this occasion. I would often see Kung Hei Fat Choi streamed in different media but while watching the news right now, they used, possibly, a different language? But also seem like a Chinese greeting. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 112.201.168.178 (talk) 11:05, 2 February 2011 (UTC)

Chinese New Year - Lunar New Year is better terms[edit]

Hi, I would like to say: "Lunar New Year" is better term than "Chinese New Year", because Not only Chinese celebrate this date as their traditional New Year but Vietnamese, Indonesians, Macau, Malaysians, Philippinos, Singapore,Taiwanese, Thailand, Indians, etc, also celebrate this biggest holidays of the year! Thanks. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.194.43.200 (talk) 12:55, 2 February 2011 (UTC)

Hi, there, do you konw who created lunar new year in eastasia? do you know the official name of Hongkong Macau and Taiwan ? Do you know lunar new year even in singarpore malaysia Thailand philipnis and indonesia is called chinese new year. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Amflussi (talkcontribs) 00:07, 17 February 2018 (UTC)

the new chiness year[edit]

when will began the new chiness year celebration —Preceding unsigned comment added by 212.103.173.121 (talk) 13:22, 20 February 2011 (UTC)

I see no problem with the use of "Chinese New Year"[edit]

Because the lunar calendar was invented by the Chinese in their ancient time, according to Shi Ji(the most reliable history record of Chinese history before the Han Dynasty), and can be traced back to the time of Huang Di(The Yellow Emperor) who lived in the era around 2500-3000 BC. That is a history of about 5,000 years or more. So the Chinese have no doubt own the credit. Do not let politics, jealousy or racism blind your wisdom ,guys. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Berubenc (talkcontribs) 03:45, 21 January 2012 (UTC)

Are you saying that the Chinese invented every lunar calendar or only the ones used in East Asia? Surely they didn't invent the Jewish or Islamic calendars.MidlandLinda (talk) 13:41, 23 January 2012 (UTC)

By that logic, it is even more ridiculous to say "Lunar New Year" instead of "Chinese New Year," as Chinese certainly did not invent all lunar calendars. However, it should be noted that the lunar new year celebrations in many East Asian countries are directly derived from the original Chinese New Year; therefore it is best to call the festival "Chinese New Year" or "Spring Festival."

Furthermore, it should be noted that this article discusses mostly about Chinese celebration of the festival: the Japanese and Korean New Years are covered under their respective pages. ZhangYuu (talk) 23:42, 25 January 2012 (UTC)

This is not an issue of "racism", "jealousy", or "politics". This is an issue of Chinese culture inadvertently overshadowing and downplaying the culture of our countries (Tibet, Korea, Mongolia, Vietnam, and even Japan). Regardless of the festival's roots, the Lunar New Year is now unique to each of our cultures. And therefore, is not owned by China because of its origin. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ayoopdog (talkcontribs) 09:29, January 18, 2014

Wrong dates?[edit]

The dates for New Year in the "Dates" section look strange. They surely don't occur in March.Stone-turner (talk) 11:51, 10 October 2012 (UTC)

Chinese names - correction and new section[edit]

I have moved the details about the Chinese name(s) and their translations to a new section with corrections. The previous content contained a few errors: for example, the change to "Spring Festival" did not involve moving the celebrations from one day to another, but the swapping over of names. Also, "Agiriculture / Agricultural / Agrarian Calendar" is a really bad way of translating the Chinese term, and none of the three are commonly used in English. --PalaceGuard008 (Talk) 22:55, 2 February 2013 (UTC)

"Imlek"[edit]

The usage of Imlek (edit | talk | history | protect | delete | links | watch | logs | views) is under discussion, see Talk:Imlek (company) -- 76.65.128.222 (talk) 04:58, 30 July 2013 (UTC)

Bold[edit]

Is it possible to add bold to the next chinese new year under the section dates? ~~Chessfreak~~ (talk) 14:22, 24 January 2014 (UTC)

error: tael[edit]

This line is incorrect:

"Dumplings symbolize wealth because their shape resembles a Chinese tael."

The dumplings resemble the shape of a Chinese sycee (see which page).

Someone with editing rights to this page ought to make the correction. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.183.75.163 (talk) 21:05, 24 January 2014 (UTC)

Done Transcendence (talk) 01:16, 25 January 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 29 January 2014[edit]

can i change a spelling error or two De La Frezzo88 (talk) 19:44, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

Question: What spelling errors would these be? --Anon126 (talk - contribs) 21:19, 29 January 2014 (UTC)
Though Diannaa has written "mark as answered; article is not protected", the article indeed look protected to me (I see a "View source" tab, and not the "Edit" one). Maybe it's protected only regarding not logged and newly registered users? --109.53.247.194 (talk) 18:34, 30 January 2014 (UTC)
The protection was re-added at 18:09, January 30, 2014‎. If De La Frezzo88 could please tell us what are the spelling errors they spotted, they can be corrected. -- Diannaa (talk) 19:47, 30 January 2014 (UTC)

Strange sort of Chinese New Year dates list[edit]

Chinese New Year dates list is sorted in a strange way, indeed!

One expect to read them in year order, as in articles about Easter, Carnival and more closer to this article Losar (and even Solstice). --109.53.212.116 (talk) 23:20, 29 January 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 30 January 2014[edit]

Pleas add {{Clarify}} to the table in the "Dates" section. --109.53.247.194 (talk) 18:36, 30 January 2014 (UTC)

Not done: The table seems quite clear to me - it's in chronological order from top to bottom, then across. There was quite a bit of vandalism in the article earlier today... it's possible that you saw a version where that table was messed up? --ElHef (Meep?) 03:24, 31 January 2014 (UTC)
It's not so clear, years are divided in three columns, and preceded by two other columns not so meaningful regarding finding out the date (which is the section topic).
I do not say that it's an understandable table, and not that one can not find out the date,
but that is no easy to find out and it's not clear: it's an improvement request. (This is way I'm suggested a "clarify" template, not a "mistake" template. My be there is a more suitable template, for example Template:Confusing, please use the best one, if know one.)
Please see other articles, as the ones linked, to understand what I mean with easy and clear. --109.55.6.183 (talk) 08:21, 31 January 2014 (UTC)
I reviewed the table as someone not involved in the original and I think the table is quite straight forward though you do need to know about the Chinese zodiac to get it. The section might be enhanced by a preceding paragraph along the lines for, "The current year began on January 31, 2014 and the next new year will begin on Feburary 19, 2015." Rincewind42 (talk) 14:51, 31 January 2014 (UTC)
But this article is titled "Chinese New Year" not "Chinese zodiac". One is looking for the Chinese New Year day's date, not a Chinese zodiac stuff. --109.53.228.48 (talk) 08:56, 18 April 2014 (UTC)
Read the article and you might understand. Chinese new year is part of the zodiac. The date of new year is determined by the zodiac. The name of the new year comes form the zodiac. The two topics are inseparable. They are two sides of the same coin. Rincewind42 (talk) 12:56, 18 April 2014 (UTC)
Today (30 Jan 2018) I see two such tables. The second one desperately needs some explanation. How long will it take the average reader to figure out that "1912-1930" means that the top cell is 1912 and the one below it 1913, and so on? And it is based on "Anno Minguo." How many will know that the correct spelling is míngguó, or that the mainland hasn't used that since 1949? And without the hanzi (民國) or the correct spelling, they can't look it up. And I have no clue what the pinyin under each animal is about. Without the hanzi, I have no way of looking them up either. My first guess was that it was the adding of the five colors, but a closer look reveals that there are more than five. Someone who knows more than I do, please add enough text for someone who knows a lot less than I do. Maybe even create one table that says everything instead of having two that partially duplicate each other. 谢谢。

Date format consistency[edit]

As established by this edit on January 24, 2005, this article uses the MDY date format. See MOS:DATEFORMAT. Rincewind42 (talk) 16:52, 31 January 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 1 February 2014[edit]

I found a mistake of a mistranslated word "waxed meat" and I'm here to request to fix it.

It is found in the following two sentences: "Is usually served in a dish with rondelles of Chinese sausage or 'waxed meat' during Chinese New Year. " "The 'waxed meat' is so chosen because it is traditionally the primary method for storing meat over the winter and the meat rondelles resemble coins."

In Chinese cuisine, there is no such kind of food called "waxed meat" .(Mandarin: 蜡肉 là ròu) There is a kind of food that sounds similar called Chinese cured pork. (or Chinese bacon as an alternative name) (Mandarin: 腊肉 là ròu) Chinese cured pork is a traditional food in China and usually served in a dish with other vegetables. (e.g. leek) The two Chinese words sounds the same and they look similar in Chinese characters. It had been a mistake Play better (talk) 15:47, 1 February 2014 (UTC)

Where's the English in the Greetings Section[edit]

This is the English Wikipedia, it should be in English first with as little foreign language required. However the "Greetings" section of this article is written with Chinese first follow by an excessive number of regional pronunciations and transliterations and the English text has gotten lost underneath. A person with no Chinese language ability, i.e. the vast majority of the readership, would not understand this section at all. It needs to be completely re-written with English text at the forefront and the Chinese script as annotations. The multiple transliterations should be dropped completely as they create so much clutter as to render the whole section unreadable. Rincewind42 (talk) 16:11, 6 February 2014 (UTC)

History of firecrackers[edit]

The article says, "Bamboo stems filled with gunpowder that were burnt to create small explosions were once used in ancient China to drive away evil spirits," but according to the gunpowder article, gunpowder came to be known around the ninth century CE and wasn't known in ancient China. Before that, bamboo was heated so it exploded. Whether exploding bamboo was used to scare off evil spirits isn't discussed in the article, however. --BB12 (talk) 01:05, 26 July 2014 (UTC)

Problems with the table for Public Holidays[edit]

Some entries in the table of Public Holidays for Chinese New Year (CNY) do not seem to be valid. Many of the countries toward the bottom (and recently added) do NOT seem to actually be public holidays, in that the added countries do not grant days off or close government offices. Yes, some people may take these days off as vacation but they are not public holidays.

Also plan to add two sentences to the intro paragraph in this section. One will explain that non-China countries may have different names for the festival: "Depending on the country, the holiday may be termed differently; common names are "Chinese New Year", "Lunar New Year", "New Year Festival", and "Spring Festival"." The other sentence will link to existing articles about lunar new years that are not CNYs: "For New Year celebrations that are lunar but not based on the Chinese New Year (such as Korea's Seollal and Vietnam's Tết), see the article on Lunar New Year."

I also plan to put a comment on the table to the effect that "Before adding other countries to this table, please verify that 1) the country declares an official public holiday where government facilities are closed and 2) the celebration is not covered in the separate Lunar New Year article. Also, supply at least one reliable, published source for the addition per WP:RS."

These sources are from the country’s government itself where possible, but the US embassy websites are good at showing the host country’s holidays also.

The following countries do NOT have CNY-related public holidays, although the table currently lists them:

Note that the following countries in the table DO have public holiday(s) for CNY, although what I found does not always agree with the current table:

The following countries have a "special non-working day" for CNY, although this information does not always match what is currently on the table

The following countries have a public holiday for Lunar New Year, but it is not as closely tied with the Chinese New Year and, in fact, have their own Wikipedia articles. These will be removed from the list of Public Holidays in this article:

  • Vietnam

I am planning to fix/remove these entries unless somebody has data to the contrary. Please comment. —Molly-in-md (talk) 23:15, 18 February 2015 (UTC)

Please do fix it whenever you have time. Clearly it is wrong. Working in Sydney, Australia I'd certainly know if I had 8 days public holidays. As your link (technically public holidays are usually a state government thing but regardless) suggests there is NO public holiday in Australia for Chinese New Year (or Lunar New Year for the matter).Tigerman2005 (talk) 02:01, 20 February 2015 (UTC)

 Done The intro paragraphs and table in that section are now updated with this information. —Molly-in-md (talk) 13:33, 4 March 2015 (UTC)

2015 year of Goat?[edit]

where did this come from? Most other sources call 2015 year of the SHEEP. Is any one more certain than I am?Petethewhistle (talk) 17:16, 19 February 2015 (UTC)

Refer to Goat (zodiac), which lists Goat first but sheep also as an alternate. In fact there is a whole section about whether it should be Goat or sheep. 野狼院ひさし u/t/c 02:10, 20 February 2015 (UTC)
Not a bug The controversy is adequately covered in the Goat (zodiac) article, which is hotlinked to the first instance of "Goat" in the article. —Molly-in-md (talk) 17:25, 27 February 2015 (UTC)

Hokkien and other romanizations[edit]

The romanizations for Hokkien need to be cleaned up. Many are bunched up next to English words without a space separating the parentheses and English words. WikiWinters (talk) 13:25, 21 February 2015 (UTC)

 Done I fixed all instances that I found. —Molly-in-md (talk) 17:16, 27 February 2015 (UTC)

Why is row highlighted?[edit]

Could someone add an explanation in the footnote of the table titled "The date of Chinese New Year's Day (1912-2101)" as to why the Feb 5 row is highlighted in that table? It is unclear to me why this row is yellow. Thanks, Ben Boldt 05:19, 2 March 2015 (UTC)

When was the first Spring Festival!!!!!!!! This site was no help at all!!! >:(

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'Dates in Chinese Lunar Calendar' section[edit]

'Dates in Chinese Lunar Calendar' section is actually mainly about Chinese New Year's date in Gregorian calendar. Should we rename the section?

By the way, there a text staing 'One scheme of continuously numbered Chinese-calendar years assigns 4709 to the year beginning, 2011, but this is not universally accepted; the calendar is traditionally cyclical, not continuously numbered.' , this should be updated as the year begining is not 2011 any more. Or even better the sentence should be changed in a way that would not need any further update). --62.19.51.21 (talk) 00:08, 3 February 2016 (UTC)

And also about that text: 'continuously numbered Chinese-calendar years' is a wikilink to Chinese calendar#Continuously numbered years , but there is not that section in the target article. --62.19.51.21 (talk) 00:10, 3 February 2016 (UTC)

Interactive diagram isn't.[edit]

Clicking the interactive year diagram from the article brings up... something. Nothing useful, just a blank grid with numbers on the edge. I'm running Firefox 44.0 so this isn't a browser issue (translation: Make it work in Firefox. It's mainstream enough you have to care about it.) so it must be a file issue.—chbarts (talk) 14:56, 8 February 2016 (UTC)

Firefox has a bug (likely http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12830897/svg-renders-but-gets-cut-off-in-firefox-only-why) in which some SVGs with interactivity are partially rendered when accessed via a link (see also User_talk:Sameboat#Dynamic_SVG). On the blank grid page, focusing to the address bar and pressing Enter to reload the page fixes it. Reloading the page using ctrl-R or F5 does not work. cmɢʟeeτaʟκ 20:25, 10 February 2016 (UTC)

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Chinese names[edit]

In China CNY is known as 春节,but shouldn't the term 农历新年 be given also, considering chunjie cannot be used in the SE Asia or Australia, New Zealand where there are significant overseas Chinese population? There is no spring in tropical countries and it is late summer/early autumn in the Southern hemisphere.

Why "Year"?[edit]

If the definition of a Year is how long a planet revolves around it's sun... why is it called "Year" and not something else in this context as it doesn't appear to be a year?

ZhuLien (talk) 14:55, 27 February 2017 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 27.32.141.11 (talk)

Mistranslation of the Chinese term for this year's zodiac sign[edit]

Throughout the article the Chinese term 鸡 (Jī) is translated to mean "Rooster," the masculine form of Chicken. This is incorrect as the Chinese term 鸡 (Jī) is gender neutral and would be more properly rendered in English as Chicken. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2601:281:C300:AE9D:9C2E:215B:3A99:1914 (talk) 20:58, 28 January 2017 (UTC)

first time here but this makes no sense...[edit]

oh wait it does, I am stupid[edit]

"Among about one third of the Mainland population, or 500 million Northerners, dumplings (especially those of vegetarian fillings) feature prominently in the meals celebrating the festival." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.207.72.133 (talk) 21:26, 28 January 2017 (UTC)

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Maybe, "Lunisolar" New Year?[edit]

and one of the Lunar New Years in Asia

但春节(Spring Festival)不是阴历新年(not Lunar New Year),是农历新年("Chinese lunisolar calendar" New Year, or Rural Calendar New Year)啊?--林卯talk? 12:34, 20 February 2018 (UTC)

It’s most commonly known as Chinese New Year in English speaking countries, so in English. If you want to change the article’s name, and so move the article ,then you can open a Requested move discussion. But I think it is very unlikely to succeed.--JohnBlackburnewordsdeeds 12:58, 20 February 2018 (UTC)