Talk:Yuan (currency)

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Audio Prounciation Link 'aan' or 'en' ?[edit]

Surely, the audio pronounciation of the listen link (yuán.ogg) is wrong? I've never heard people from China or Taiwan say it with a long 'aaah'.

Yuan has an implied umlaut above the 'u' (üan). This changes the overall sound of 'uan' which separates from other 'uan's in the pinyin table. The IPA that preceeds it is correct.

yuan as ü + an. IPA:[y̯æn] or [ɥɛ̌n]

The u is longer and the 'an' is shorter. The combined effect is that the 'an' sounds more like 'en' as spoken by most native mandarin speakers of today. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 218.252.34.244 (talk) 06:54, 28 September 2015 (UTC)

Merge with Ren Min Bi[edit]

Hey, this shoudl probably be merged with the OTHER page on chinese currency: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ren_min_bi

No. Yuan is the unit, and Renminbi is the name of the currency. Yuan and RMB are not supposed to be interchangable, but unfortunately many English-language texts like to make that mistake. RMB only refers to the currency used by the PRC; Yuan refers to any type of monetary form, whether it be republican or some other era; the Japanese Yen uses the same Kyujitai character for yuan, as does the Korean Won. In everyday language, "American yuan" (美元; meiyuan) refers to the US Dollar, and "European yuan" (欧元 ouyuan) refers to the Euro; yuan can have a large variety of definitions, but it cannot be equated with RMB. -- 李博杰  | Talk contribs email 15:46, 5 July 2010 (UTC)
This is not an article about the Chinese word "元" (Wikipedia is not a dictionary anyway), but is titled "Chinese yuan". So any mention of what the Chinese also call "yuan" is not the topic. --2.245.154.110 (talk) 12:52, 3 June 2015 (UTC)
Surely common sense applies here? We do not have an article called 元 because this is the English Wikipedia, and WP:USEENG applies. The topic of this article is the yuan, and not the RMB. Your statement regarding the title is a non sequitur. --benlisquareTCE 04:49, 6 June 2015 (UTC)