Talk:Cholinesterase

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Concerning merge from acetylcholinesterase: I consciously merged the articles in the reverse direction because acetylcholinesterase is fully dealt with on this page. Moreover, as the current page mentions there are two enzymes referred to as cholinesterase. It would thus be erroneous or misleading at least to redirect cholinesterase to the other article. Notice I left the stub status there. --Phils 17:05, 18 Oct 2004 (UTC)

External links broken[edit]

Removed here, if someone could find the documents in question without page forwarding links, it'd be awesome. Otherwise will do later hopefully.

  • Study showing magnolia oil as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.
  • Cholinesterase inhibitors might alleviate methamphetamine-induced delusions, hallucinations and cognitive impairment, while reducing craving and addiction

—The preceding unsigned comment was added by Tom Meakin (talkcontribs) 09:54, 31 January 2007 (UTC).

Cholinesterase inhibitor discoverer[edit]

Revision as of 06:38, 22 August 2005 by 211.30.120.226 stated that

Cholinesterase inhibitors were discovered by Professor Cardillo of Sydney University, Australia.

On August 23rd 2005, User:Jfdwolff removed that part and commented:

Strychnine has been around for much longer


Although I'm unable to confirm the first statement, I know for sure that the counterargument doesn't stand. Even though the manifestations of a strychnine poisoning resemble that of a cholinesterase inhibitor massive overdose in that both may produce myoclonic or tetanic convulsion, strychnine is not a cholinesterase inhibitor.


Strychnine works by blocking the release of glycine from inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord. This increases reflex excitability and result in convulsion.

Ref: Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM. Pharmacology ISBN 0-443-05974-8


If someone can ascertain that a Professor Cardillo did discover cholinesterase inhibitor, please add it to the text and state your source.


Benoitduhaime 05:24, 9 October 2005 (UTC)

Merge[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the proposal was not to merge per consensus.


This page should be split into AChE and PChE -- it makes no sense to have an AChE page *and* one that discusses both AChE and PChE. Danierrr (talk) 02:12, 5 September 2008 (UTC)
Oppose. The cholinesterase enzyme article is about the family of isozymes, of which there are two in human (ACHE and BCHE) but many more in other species. The acetylcholinesterase article is about one specific human isozyme, AchE. Boghog2 (talk) 05:59, 5 September 2008 (UTC)

I think the title should be "Cholinesterases," but should not be merged with AChE page, as stated above. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Lpezzeme (talkcontribs) 05:40, 13 October 2008 (UTC)

  • I agree with BogHog2. The "family" page should stay independent. --CopperKettle 10:46, 8 February 2009 (UTC)

I totally agree (with Lpezzee, Boghog, CopperKettle) that the title of the "Cholinesterase enzyme" wiki.Page should be "Cholinesterase isoenzymes", containing all of the common conformational, reactive etc. features of the iso-enzymes of this "family" while only the specific differences between AChE, BChE, PChE and whatever else will be discovered out there should be reserved to be represented on those respective pages. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Waldemahr (talkcontribs) 21:04, 18 June 2009 (UTC)

Oppose. Agree that the "family" of cholinesterase enzymes should be on this page, with text wiki-links to the two (or more) specific types. Simply "Cholinesterase" is fine as a title, everyone knows it's an enzyme and that's also stated at the top of the article. We don't need an "s" on the end just because there is more than one type, just as we have an article called "Dog" but not "Dogs" even though there is more than one type. Facts707 (talk) 06:14, 25 October 2009 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Confusing topic....[edit]

Please do not assign a EC number, examplified in the article, to a class of the enzymes

O...F..F...I...C...I...A...L

definition of EC number...??? --222.64.223.233 (talk) 07:15, 30 July 2009 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the proposal was move per request. It turns out that this was cut and pasted from the move target in January 2007 and a history merge is required, which will also be done.--Fuhghettaboutit (talk) 13:55, 7 November 2009 (UTC)


Cholinesterase enzymeCholinesterase — Second word "enzyme" not necessary, implied by "ase" suffix and also stated in lead sentence of article] --Facts707 (talk) 17:37, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Also, all other enzymes and their derived enzymes in the templates at the bottom of the page do not have the word "enzyme" in their articles' titles. Facts707 (talk) 07:35, 4 November 2009 (UTC)
  • Support — Facts707 is correct that -ase indicates an enzyme. Also, the requested move is consistent with common usage in reliable sources. --Una Smith (talk) 03:13, 1 November 2009 (UTC)
  • Support — Current name is redundant. --Boghog (talk) 22:46, 2 November 2009 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.


Question Relating to All Topics Related to Acetylcholinesterase[edit]

it seems as though the question of WHY organophosphates inhibit this enzyme is skimmed, skipped, or glossed over (probably intentionally so)... It seems as though no authors are willing to say something as clear cut as: "the organophosphate inhibitors structurally resemble the activated tetrahedral transition state of enzyme bound acetylcholine, and inclusion of a leaving group that is labile upon reaction of the phosphorous center with the the serine residue results in an irreversibly deactivated enzyme" I have brought this up because this specific example is often used in introductory upper division biochemistry courses to help teach students about host-guest macromolecular chemistry, common enzymatic mechanisms (carbonyl-->tetrahedral Tstate stabilized by His residues for example), etc... Yet I see no mention of this, even with a big "warning" or "disclaimer" that says: "this information is not general, and not all classes of inhibitors function in this way"68.6.76.31 (talk) 21:09, 9 February 2011 (UTC)