Talk:Clash cymbals

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Name[edit]

I admit I've lost some sleep over the name of this article, but I can't find a better one than clash cymbal. Many professional percussionists have never even have heard this term, which is a worry IMO. Others object strongly to its use on the grounds that it encourages people to play these cymbals badly, but I don't think this is true, personally, or relevant in any case.

Agreed. No one in any of my experience uses the term. It doesn't matter what musicologists call them. An encyclopedia like this one is supposed to provide useful information for people, not archaic, disfavored information. Anyone that reads this will go away thinking that they're called clash cymbals, and that's just not what is true in practice. Plus composers for orchestra for hundreds of years have written for "crash cymbals". This is not just a drum set thing. Justin

It seems to me that the term is the correct one, and is used by musicologists and musical dictionaries, even though it is generally shunned by musicians. It even gets a few non-Wikipedia derived hits on Google, such as this one. Andrewa 03:10, 23 Jun 2004 (UTC)

I can't think of a better name myself. This is a lovely article, by the way! Lupin 12:59, 8 Jul 2004 (UTC)


i have never herd of the term CLASH CYMBAL. it is called Crash cymbals. you crash them together to produce a good, well balanced sound. you dont get the flam sound you need from CLASHING!

I keep removing this from the article:
It should be pointed out that "clash cymbals" are not an accurate name for these types of cymbals. better names would be Hand cymbals or crash cymbals. whoever wrote this didnt do enough research.
And User:Gooberxxxzzz and User:69.230.228.90 keep adding it back. Evan Seeds (talk) 15:28, 2 May 2006 (UTC)

mabye becasue it actually makes sense. or the very least, change the name of the article.

We can't just change the name of the article. Crash cymbal is already an article for the more common (in popular parlance) drum set cymbals. Crash cymbals is taken only by a ridirect, but it would seem very odd for the singular version of a term to be one thing and the plural something completely different. Evan Seeds (talk) 19:17, 7 May 2006 (UTC)


WHAT ABOUT HAND CYMBALS???


What about it? "Hand cymbals", to me, projects more an image of finger cymbals (or zils) than a modern day pair of crash cymbals. I think the way we have it now, with Crash cymbal having a disamb link to Clash cymbals is as good as we can do, if not optimal. Evan Seeds (talk) 15:22, 8 May 2006 (UTC)


um, you just referred to them as zils and finger cymbals... not hand cymbals. most people dont think of zils when hand cymbals is said.

Hand cymbal can mean a suspended cymbal designed for playing with the hand rather than with a stick, and more commonly does mean this in recent percussion catalogues, so it's seriously ambiguous. Good suggestion, though. Andrewa (talk) 20:28, 19 November 2011 (UTC)

Non verticality?[edit]

Many players don't hold them vertical; about 30 degrees from vertical is quite common IME. The action is more of an in-out-diagonal movement than simply up-down in that case. Perhaps this should be included somewhere. Lupin 12:59, 8 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Air lock[edit]

What are the conditions required for getting an "air lock", when the cymbals get stuck together by air pressure? I've done this several times myself :-) Lupin 12:59, 8 Jul 2004 (UTC)

They are too flat in relationship to each other. Make sue one of them is overlapping the other one to the air has somewhere to escape to.66.61.65.242

Technique[edit]

The technique as given is for marching cymbals, whereas orchestal cymbals have a quite different technique, as I've added in. Metalcore424 04:00, 5 December 2005 (UTC)

Central and South Asia[edit]

Should this article cover the Jhyali, Karatalas, Kecer, Manjira and similar instruments? Unsure... Andrewa (talk) 07:39, 1 July 2013 (UTC)