Talk:Clerical script

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Removal[edit]

This article contained the line:

"It is possible that the Japanese writing system of katakana originated from the clerical script."

I removed this since there is no evidence I can find that the man'yōgana which formed the basis of katakana were either definitely clerical script or definitely regular script. Man'yōgana developed while regular script was in its infancy, but it is known that man'yōgana were written in all the forms of calligraphy including cursive script which definitely was the basis of hiragana; and that by the time katakana was developed, the regular script was already widely in use. Modern katakana has the roughly square character shapes of regular script. AKADriver 22:10, 18 April 2006 (UTC)

"Name" section[edit]

This section is just completely wrong. "隸" (li) does not mean either "slave" or "prisoner". It means a person with low social status, or low ranks in case of a government employee (see [[1]] and [[2]]). The cited source in this secion (ref 12) probably made the wrong asciation between "隸" and "slave" due to the modern Chinese word "奴隸" (slave), where the "slave" part is actually "奴", while "隸" just means a worker/laborer. In fact, in older texts when "隸" is used by itself as a noun, it's most often referring to a low ranking personel in some goverment agency doing daily chores--such as handling paperworks, hence "clerical". "Clerical script" is an apt translation. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.148.60.130 (talk) 03:48, 4 March 2010 (UTC)