Talk:Cloud computing

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
WikiProject Computing (Rated C-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computing, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of computers, computing, and information technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

History[edit]

Pending to add Alibaba Cloud to history. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 187.189.102.199 (talk) 23:08, 20 March 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 19 March 2018[edit]

I was an established Wiki Editor for years, however, my email domain went away (while I was sitting in a cargo container in Iraq) and over the past month I have not been able to login into the ID, spfrazer, so I created a new account under, stevefrazer. I would be happy to return the spfrazer and delete the new account - I sent several emails into the "Wiki Helpdesk" - no response. Please help me reset the password for spfrazer. Thank you!

The following is too much information I understand (though the following is only 10% of what I have documented), however, there are hundreds of millions of records that can be produced - particularly from the cloud computing monitoring system I wrote in 1994. There are hundreds of people still alive who will confirm this history. Just need to know what you folks require. Regards...

CHANGE FROM:

While the term "cloud computing" was popularized with Amazon.com releasing its Elastic Compute Cloud product in 2006,[8] references to the phrase "cloud computing" appeared as early as 1996, with the first known mention in a Compaq internal document.[9]

TO:

While the term "cloud computing" was popularized with Amazon.com releasing its Elastic Compute Cloud product in 2006,[8] references to the phrase "cloud computing" appeared as early as 1994. By late 1993, the Distributed Systems Administrators of the Investment Products Organization of the Nationwide Insurance Enterprise had already adopted naming schemes for the existing 14 UNIX servers. They used oceans (Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, ...) for the larger servers and rivers (Nile, Amazon, Mississippi, Ohio, ...) for the smaller departmental servers. All of these physical servers were local to the downtown, Columbus, Ohio complex and its 2 data centers. However, the new wave of servers being developed were to be located in multiple data centers - many in other states. So Stephen Frazer, the new Systems Administrator and Analyst assigned this task, selected a naming scheme based on clouds (Nimbus, Cumulus, Cirrus, ...). He selected this naming scheme as his network diagrams being drafted in the first weeks of his employment used a "cloud-like" icon for the various projected geo-diverse locations and also because he had spent a decade serving as a co-pilot for his Father's (Lloyd Frazer) commercial flight service literally ... in the clouds [Lloyd Father was a noteworthy aircraft Pilot/Flight Instructor during WWII and flew passengers and cargo for 30+ years thereafter].

In 1994, Frazer, along with the Distributed Systems Team designed, built and began managing the "Cloud Computers" for Nationwide - including the largest HP-9000 in existence - all geo-diverse with real-time sync and fail-over.

Within a few months of being hired, Frazer was also asked to evaluate the new HP-Overview network monitoring system. The system was installed and configured with a great deal of help from HP, however, this early version was undependable. Since many of the Cloud Computers were coming on-line and transitioning into production and they were already processing tens, if not hundreds of millions of dollars of financial flows per day, a dependable, robust monitoring system was essential. The HP-Overview system was put on-hold with an invite to bring it back once stable.

Frazer then designed and created a monitoring system writing over 10,000 lines of code in AWK/bash and std UNIX calls to proactively monitor all of the Mission Critical and Production servers. This included network availability, NFS mounts, disk space, central monitoring for CPU/Memory utilization, swap, network bandwidth, ... and the main purpose of this monitoring tool was to verify financial flows - tens of thousands of monitoring events of interest. In the financial processing world, flow events are sequential and Frazer's scripts verified that each step in every dependency progression was complete before beginning the next (which would create havoc if the previous had not completed properly). This monitoring system created log entries and sent out pro-active telephony pages to the financial support team members and the scripts used the following phrases (typically 2,000-5,000 text pages were sent per day to over 200 Staff and Consultants from a bank of several analog modems):

   "xyz file transfer to the cloud complete: datestamp"
   "backup of /dsk/xyz to cloud computer xyz complete"
   "cloud computer cirrus at 95% in /tmp"
   "cloud computer network interface at 80% capacity" (Frazer designed the cloud computers with dedicated LAN and WAN interfaces - some with as many as 16 network ports for the best granularity for security and capacity)
   "cloud computing T3 interface at 98%"  (this was a common issue and Frazer's code would literally cycle in a time-waster in the form of UNIX sleep commands as packet ACK's in a fully saturated network pipe would sometimes fail within the allotted time window which would potentially result in data transfer errors)

Over the next 2 years (1995-1996), security for cloud computing became an extremely important focus. Frazer certified with 2 IT Security training programs, including firewall design and played a major role on the Nationwide Firewall Design Team. Frazer later served as the Chief Architect of the first in-house International Firewall for AEP (then Fortune 38 in 1999) and the Chief Architect of the first financial transaction system on the open public Internet which eliminated the FDIC and SEC legislative requirements for the use of private telecom circuits (AT&T/Fortune 8 in 2000) and introduced the concept of Cloud Computing into both companies.

In late 1995, Nationwide purchased thousands of desktop computers from Gateway Computer (likely why they had records referencing "Cloud Computing" in 1996). Gateway Staff members were in Nationwide offices for 3 months as part of the sales, purchase and install contract. Frazer met with several of the execs and techs of the company and discussed the geo-diverse monitoring and Cloud Computing systems. These discussions included the fact that Gateway was about to launch a new line of server products to keep up with Dell. In 1995 the Nationwide Distributed Team had embraced the Netscape array of products and were helping to setup the Netscape Client software on the new desktop "Cow Computers" [so nick-named due to the graphics on their shipping boxes] to interface with Nationwide's then latest array of new "Cloud Computers" servers - which were running the Netscape Server Systems. Two of the Gateway servers were later received and tested by Nationwide for the Gateway Server evaluation project, code named "Cows in the Clouds".

Through-out 1994-1996, Frazer and the other Nationwide IPO UNIX Systems Administrators - ultimately 12 Staff, the 4 Network Administrators and 6 Database Administrators were being certified - often in multiple sub-technologies and versions so multiple training sessions with Dec, Sun, IBM, HP, Cisco, Oracle, Sybase and list of other tech savvy companies. Most of these firms' top-level training centers were in their corporate headquarters and when the representatives of a Fortune 100 client appeared, it was common for executive management of these tech firms to visit and welcome the students at some point during the training session. Everyone was interested in this concept of Geo-diverse Cloud Computing and the concepts of load balancing and high availability fail-over were often discussed. The phrases, "Cloud Computing" and "Cloud Computers" became common vocabulary in the industry. When Frazer was training at the DEC Corporate Headquarters in Maynard, MA, in 1995, he took the DEC helicopter flight back to Boston International Airport sitting beside a Training Instructor in DEC's program. Over backseat private channel mics with headsets both laughed about discussing "cloud computing while literally in the clouds". Stevefrazer (talk) 02:03, 20 March 2018 (UTC)

 Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. That is, please provide reliablesecondary sources. This is a very large amount of text with zero references and we cannot accept your personal testimony. Please also ensure you have read the Conflict of Interest policy. This is an important policy that you agreed to follow when you created your account, so I would like to make sure you are aware of it. This edit request is the type of request that the policy encourages, so thank you for doing that. We still, however, require the type of sourcing linked above. I hope this helps. Eggishorn (talk) (contrib) 15:44, 20 March 2018 (UTC)

Use of verb “claim”[edit]

I feel that the use of the phrase “Proponents also claim”, and the use of the verb ‘claim’ therein, could be perceived as a violation of impartial account, discrediting the “claim” that follow’s. Perhaps this should be changed to ‘Proponents also say’? LiberalPointofView (talk) 14:50, 9 May 2018 (UTC)

an information technology (IT) paradigm that enables ubiquitous access to shared pools of configurable system resources and higher-level services that can be rapidly provisioned with minimal management effort[edit]

There must be a jargon-free way of describing the cloud. So many of these words go undefined and not even linked to other WP pages. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.136.229.25 (talk) 09:06, 15 May 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 17 May 2018[edit]

Cloudlab306 (talk) 10:18, 17 May 2018 (UTC)
 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. L293D ( • ) 11:55, 17 May 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 30 May 2018[edit]

The world’s first cloud computing patent was submitted on December 24, 1999 by Hardy F. Schloer[1] and granted by the UK and German patent offices can be found on the European Patent Register[2] and at Google Patents[3].

Schloer termed his system a “one page web” and explains the “method and device for presenting data to a user (in what has become known as “the cloud“). It is complete with:

 multiple user applications  Cloud storage  Multiple identification providers  Back-end servers – including plug-in applications  Multiple tiers of servers capable of handling different end-user devices via the internet  Built-in security features

Schloer is the inventor and holder of many Information Technology (IT) related patents. CitizenHuman (talk) 09:11, 30 May 2018 (UTC)

References

 Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. As an anonymous student project, ref #1 is not a reliable source. Refs #2 and #3 are only primary sources which cannot be analyzed in Wikipedia's voice and need a secondary expert source (book, journal, etc.) doing the analysis. Also, ref #1 does not verify "the first patent" but mentions only "an early implementation". Please note, that all parts of an edit request should be sourced to published independent sources (usually secondary sources to avoid original research). GermanJoe (talk) 10:36, 30 May 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 11 June 2018[edit]

In 1999, on December 24, the first known Cloud computing implementation was submitted for patent protection[1] and put to use by Hardy Schloer in England and Germany[2]. Mr. Schloer termed the system a “one page web” and explains the “method and device for presenting data to a user (in what has become known as “the cloud”). It is complete with: • Multiple user applications • Cloud storage • Multiple identification providers • Back-end servers – including plug-in applications • Multiple tiers of servers capable of handling different end-user devices via the internet • Built-in security features CitizenHuman (talk) 13:14, 11 June 2018 (UTC)

 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. L293D ( • ) 13:18, 11 June 2018 (UTC)

References

prashanth[edit]

hi , iam prashanth.how are you — Preceding unsigned comment added by 210.16.76.133 (talk) 08:39, 19 June 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 19 June 2018[edit]

I would like to enhance the block Platform as a Service, adding information about one more model of PaaS:

CHANGE FROM:

Generally, public cloud service providers like Amazon Web Services (AWS), Oracle, Microsoft and Google own and operate the infrastructure at their data center and access is generally via the Internet. AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, and Google also offer direct connect services called "AWS Direct Connect", "Oracle FastConnect", "Azure ExpressRoute", and "Cloud Interconnect" respectively, such connections require customers to purchase or lease a private connection to a peering point offered by the cloud provider.[40][87]

TO:

Generally, public cloud service providers like Amazon Web Services (AWS), Oracle, Microsoft and Google own and operate the infrastructure at their data center and access is generally via the Internet. AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, and Google also offer direct connect services called "AWS Direct Connect", "Oracle FastConnect", "Azure ExpressRoute", and "Cloud Interconnect" respectively, such connections require customers to purchase or lease a private connection to a peering point offered by the cloud provider. One more model is when PaaS provides its services via hosting partners and their local data centers, like Jelastic PaaS [1]

Mariia Hepalova (talk) 13:51, 19 June 2018 (UTC)