Talk:Co-branding

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yay team[edit]

I like the quote from Co-Branding: The Science of Alliance it really gives of good definition of the term and states great examples as well. (unsigned)

Store brands[edit]

The Store brands section currently reads:

Many large store chains use co-branding for their store brand to avoid the negative stigma that is often associated with store brands. For example, Costco's store brand is Kirkland Signature, including everything from fitness water to clothing.

How is this an example of co-branding? As someone who is not from USA I don't know much about Costco other than they are a large retailer. To me only one brand has been mentioned here: Kirkland Signature. For it to be co-branded, wouldn't it have to be something like "Kirkland Signature Cola (made by Pepsi)", "Kirkland Signature Tissues (made by Kleenex)? I'm not disputing that store brands are an example of co-branding, but the fact that Woolworths produce two store brands doesn't make those two store brands co-branded. Or if it does, this needs to be better explained! Garrie 03:46, 31 July 2008 (UTC)

Agreed. This is not an example of Co-Branding. It's better considered and example of Private Label branding / strategy.Billyoffland (talk) 14:52, 20 May 2010 (UTC)


Unofficial Co-Branding[edit]

We should describe / show examples of unofficial (unauthorized?) Co-Branding. I would describe this as one company (accurately or inaccurately) highlighting a service providers brand in their marketing. Examples of this include websites claiming "As seen on" CNN / BBC / Google etc. In addition to acquiring some of the service providers Brand Equity, the products perceived credibility is improved by using the Branding of news sources. Sometimes the association is absolutely false. Other times the company makes the claim of association based their adversing have appeared on the third party's website / TV shows etc.

I would have already written this up but (surprisingly) I am having a really hard time finding sources to site. Clearly this occurs. It's currently so prevalent that the FTC are becoming involved. If you know of any and don't feel like writing that part of the article, feel free to just leave sources / URLs in here and I will check back and write them up. Billyoffland (talk) 14:52, 20 May 2010 (UTC)