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Untitled 1[edit]

If you found recipes for Pepsi and Coke, they are almost certainly wrong. The recipe for Coke is one of the most closely guarded secrets in the world. At best what you found is "what we think is in Coke", or more likely "how to make a Coke-like drink". I would certainly not trust them to tell me what is/is not in commercial Coke. The same arguments can likely be made for other major soft drinks. -- 22:54, 6 May 2006 (UTC)

Inca Kola?!? Other than the name, what does it have in common with the drink this article is about? I submit that Inca Kola is a completely different beverage that does not fall under the "cola" umbrella. Tooki 18:18, 10 Jul 2004 (UTC)

According to this Straight Dope article, Jolt Cola is not actually the most caffeinated soft drink around. This would be the German soft drink Afri-Cola. MCBastos

Untitled 2[edit]

Dr Pepper isn't a cola, so I'm removing it from this page.

What is Dr Pepper if not a cola? Why did you delete the factually correct statement that Inka cola is marketed mostly by the Coca Cola company? Get-back-world-respect 21:07, 26 Feb 2005 (UTC)
I believe Dr Pepper is a soft drink. Dr Pepper says
"Unlike Coca-Cola and Pepsi, Dr Pepper is not a cola."
If a correction is necessary, it should start there. Quale 23:02, 6 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Untitled 3[edit]

What the ghell is River doing in that picture? That's not cola at all; it's river water! --Kawachan 14:44, 19 December 2005 (UTC)

Something is missing from this discussion![edit]

Where are all the Brits claiming that they invented cola? Take a look at the Wikipedia page for nearly every quinisentially American food and there are the Brits claiming they invented it. Sorry, but it's become a bit of a hobby of mine to poke around the discussion pages to see these asinine claims! —Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 16:57, 24 April 2009 (UTC)

is that right?[edit]

There is a short paragraph on the page stating that it is possible that Coca-Cola 'invented' the name 'Cola' because of the Coca-Cola-like drinks around, and they wanted 'Coke' to be unique. This sounds untrustworthy, it sounds like coca-cola invented the cola drink, is that right? I was always under the impression that it's just a... folk recipe from the dawn of time or something ((please sign your pots))

As far as I know, cola was made for curing soldiers bad stomachs (thats why it is good to drink cola when you are sick). The only thing The Coca-Cola Company invented was adding cocaine to their cola. --CableCat 22:56, 10 July 2007 (UTC)

It's an erronus statement. First of all, Pemberton had a product before Coca-Cola that had the word Cola in it; so Coca-Cola did not invent it. Second, the word Cola had already been used in various brands of kola flavored wines in the U.S. and Europe, and (as CableCat said) was applied to tonics too. Also, the way the paragraph is worded seems speculative anyway. This paragraph needs some editing. Soul Slayer (talk) 14:15, 11 December 2007 (UTC)

Also, the Red Bull Cola is not popular in Thailand as stated in the article, their market is extremely limited. —Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 03:19, 21 March 2011 (UTC)

Star cola[edit]

googling for star cola I found something from Myanmar and the United Arab Emirates. Here it says Palestine.? Get-back-world-respect 00:56, 15 February 2006 (UTC)


I don't like the statement about sweeteners. While corn syrup may be common in the US, in other places it is hardly used at all. I'm just going to make a minor change to this because I can't think of a nice way to word it, but I think that this would be good info to have in an article. --Apyule 14:38, 28 April 2006 (UTC)

I agree with you. I only use Splenda. ♦Don't say I changed the topic.♦ —Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 23:31, 14 September 2008 (UTC)

i think sweetners were a great idea to help peoplpe with dietbetes or people how can't drink straight sugar

HFCS is the most common sweetener in soft drinks (see wikipedia article on soft drinks). Soul Slayer (talk) 14:37, 11 December 2007 (UTC)

Factual errors on reactivity[edit]

The section on reactivity needs to be changed. While indeed the baking powder reaction is due to the acidity of the cola, Mentos fizzing is caused by the numerous micronucleation points available on the surface of the candy, and the dry ice just helps drive the carbon dioxide ut of solution.

And another reason that the drinks are acidic is because many colas contain phosphoric acid. I will fix the other errors; you are right. Also, I remember reading that the menthol in mentos is a surfactant and this forces more carbon dioxide out. Can anyone confirm this? -- 04:50, 23 July 2006 (UTC)

This section doesn't even need to be in the article, so I removed it. It was just a paragraph full of not-really-interesting, and mostly erroneous facts. —Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 22:44, 20 February 2010 (UTC)

Relevant to the section, I also disagree with "Being carbonated, colas are acidic & although this has no effect on the drinker,". My dentist has told me not to drink carbinated drinks any more, specifically due to the acid created via carbonation dissolving the enamel (after which it may expose the softer tooth within, thus increasing the chance of decay greatly), which is a definite effect on the drinker ;) ElectricSkrill 09:19, 19 July 2006 (UTC)

What is a cola?[edit]

I may be wrong, but isn't phosphoric acid the critical component that separates a cola from other soft drinks?

What is 'mentos' that may react with cola drinks? --Brideshead 10:38, 20 July 2006 (UTC)

Is cola a flavor?[edit]

Hey everybody, my roomates and I are having a ridiculous argument about pointless stuff once again. Is "cola" a flavor of a soft drink? Help us out!

< >.

Please do sign.

We do need a cocaine cola beverage {cocaine cola beverage} article.

Thank You.

hopiakuta 17:54, 7 October 2006 (UTC)

See kola nut. ---J.S (T/C/WRE) 00:02, 24 November 2007 (UTC)

"Dr Pepper" comment[edit]

Under the Brands heading, the article states that "Dr. Pepper is not a Cola as it contains prune juice[...]". The Dr. Pepper article says "There is a long-lived urban legend that Dr Pepper contains prune juice. However, according to the manufacturer, prune juice is not and never has been an ingredient of the drink." Even if Dr. Pepper where to contain prune juice, I fail to see why a cola could not contain that substance. -- 04:30, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

Cola, in the most specific sense, is a soda with the flavor of the kola nut. Most modern sodas achieve the flavor from other sources due to the cost of the kola nut, but it's the reason why Dr. Pepper wouldn't be considered a cola. Then again, thats just my understanding and I have no sources. ---J.S (T/C/WRE) 00:01, 24 November 2007 (UTC)
IMHO, Dr. Pepper is not a cola because it tastes completely unlike a cola. The fact that it's dark brown and fizzy is the only overlap with colas. Someone who thinks Dr. Pepper is a cola hasn't tasted it. - Denimadept (talk) 22:23, 22 April 2008 (UTC)

♦ Is there a river of cola?♦[edit]

♦ Well, let's just say there IS! First, some geography. Most of you may not know this country but next to Guyana there is Suriname. Surinme borders Brazil. In Suriname there is a creek called Cola Creek. The water of Cola creek is the color of cola. The water is also VERY shallow I could walk in it (DUH! How can a girl 5 feet 1 inch not walk in it?). I just think you should visit it but don't drink the water of Cola Creek! It'll be like you swallowing water from a river♦

Image copyright problem with Image:Pepsinewcan.jpg[edit]

The image Image:Pepsinewcan.jpg is used in this article under a claim of fair use, but it does not have an adequate explanation for why it meets the requirements for such images when used here. In particular, for each page the image is used on, it must have an explanation linking to that page which explains why it needs to be used on that page. Please check

  • That there is a non-free use rationale on the image's description page for the use in this article.
  • That this article is linked to from the image description page.

This is an automated notice by FairuseBot. For assistance on the image use policy, see Wikipedia:Media copyright questions. --07:06, 1 October 2008 (UTC)

Isn't the current first picture free marketing for Coca Cola? —Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 10:33, 29 July 2009 (UTC)

Missing Colas[edit]

When I was a kid in Nigeria, I remember tasting a few more colas not listed here: Sena? Cola, Schweppes Cola, Tab Cola, Free? Cola, Mission Cola, Vip Cola, among a few others. For a while, I had a list of all the colas that I've tasted. — Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 17:42, 21 December 2011 (UTC)

minor edit suggestion[edit]

I'm not very familiar with the editing process so i don't know how to do this myself. in the introduction, after it says "Coca-cola is a major international brand. it usually contains..." the "it" is, in my opinion, an extremely ambiguous preposition. i think "cola usually contains" would be more clear to show that these list of ingredients apply to all cola, not just coca-cola136.167.196.95 (talk) 09:46, 6 July 2012 (UTC)

Coca Cola picture[edit]

I find it a little dubious that the choice of picture has fallen on a blatantly branded variant of the soft drink. It is not Wikipedia's task to assist Coca Cola in it's public relations by implying Coca Cola is the "original" brand of cola.

I vow for a picture of a non-branded glass of cola. — Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 01:26, 18 August 2012 (UTC)

I see that this article in most other languages uses this picture:Media:Glass cola.jpg --CableCat (talk) 08:22, 2 October 2012 (UTC)

Can somebody change the picture to the one linked to above? I don't know how to!

As of yet the picture has not been changed. I think it should be changed immediately! — Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 00:36, 9 January 2013 (UTC)

Why the hell has nobody removed the goddamn picture yet? (talk) 02:40, 11 March 2013 (UTC)

AIUI, Pemberton is the "original" brand of Cola and Coca-Cola is Pemberton's invention. So there's no reason to start assuming PR efforts by Coca-Cola are the reason why there's a branded product in the masthead image. If you prefer the anonymous glass image, then just change it. Andy Dingley (talk) 02:56, 11 March 2013 (UTC)

Pepsi Throwback[edit]

As of December, 2012, the Pepsi bottler in Pennsauken, New Jersey, is no longer making Pepsi Throwback. I'm in their distribution area, and was told they discontinued... "because it is too expensive to make", whatever sense that makes since they are still making Sierra Mist, also with sugar. Their distribution is a large portion of southern NJ. PepsiCo allows its bottlers to make decisions on which products they bottle (told to me by them), effectively eliminating hearing any complaints. - Laura Cotter (talk, contribs) 12:46, 11 December 2012 (UTC)

(Above comment moved from article to Talk page by BarrelProof 19:17, 11 December 2012 (UTC).)

That is peculiar, given that it's made with genetically modified sugar beets which they use in other products in their large scope of manufacturing in North America and it can't be that expensive with the kickbacks the chemical industry receives from the Farm Bill. If they truly wanted a throwback product they'd have chosen cane sugar.Dobyblue (talk) 18:36, 15 February 2013 (UTC)

Which cola still uses cocaine?[edit]

Quote, from the article:

Most colas now use other flavoring (and caffeinating) ingredients with a similar taste and no longer contain cocaine.

If '[m]ost colas [...] no longer contain cocaine', which do? --Svippong 09:17, 2 August 2013 (UTC)

Fair use candidate from Commons: File:Generic Cola Can Jewel.jpg[edit]

The file File:Generic Cola Can Jewel.jpg, used on this page, has been deleted from Wikimedia Commons and re-uploaded at File:Generic Cola Can Jewel.jpg. It should be reviewed to determine if it is compliant with this project's non-free content policy, or else should be deleted and removed from this page. If no action is taken, it will be deleted after 7 days. Commons fair use upload bot (talk) 21:06, 27 May 2014 (UTC)

Fair use candidate from Commons: File:Soft Drink.svg[edit]

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Fair use candidate from Commons: File:Soft Drink.svg[edit]

The file File:Soft Drink.svg, used on this page, has been deleted from Wikimedia Commons and re-uploaded at File:Soft Drink.svg. It should be reviewed to determine if it is compliant with this project's non-free content policy, or else should be deleted and removed from this page. If no action is taken, it will be deleted after 7 days. Commons fair use upload bot (talk) 21:36, 27 May 2014 (UTC)