Talk:Context awareness

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What's the difference between context aware and sentiment computing?

The difference IMO is that context-awareness is more than a computer science topic, and sentient computing does show one aspect, but recently, the area has branched out into non-computing subjects such as business process design. I am removing the merge tags based on this, and will cleanup and expand on the non-computing aspects of context-awareness here. Ansell 21:07, 6 November 2006 (UTC)
I think the problem in defining the difference is largely down to one's interpretation of the term context. Sentient computing uses sensors to adapt the system in response to changes in the physical world. Context-aware computing defines certain states (contexts). If the system enters a state then it reacts to alter the system in some way. IMO context-aware computing is a branch of sentient computing since it also uses sensors to define a state.
As an example, consider a room R and two contexts (states) C1 and C2. C1 states that if the temperature is less than 18 degrees celsius then the heating should be switched on, C2 states that if the temperature is greater than 22 degrees then the heating should be switched off. Lets assume R starts in context C2, as the temperature drops R belongs to C1 thus the heating is turned on.
fdfd  —Preceding unsigned comment added by 152.120.255.250 (talk) 19:29, 6 December 2007 (UTC) 

paragraph 1 has no references, seems to be about a different topic than the lead and paragraph 3 and was opinion. I deleted it.[edit]

It is common sense to understand that context awareness did not originate in computer science or the organizational learning literature (management literature). The word "context" stems from a study of human "text"; and the idea of "situated cognition," that context changes the interpretation of text, is an idea that goes back many thousand years. One of many examples of recorded ancient analysis of context and interpretation is the writings of the Legalist school of philosophers, who were influential between 500-60 B.C. in China. In Western philosophy, one could easily identify ideas about "context awareness" from Greek epistemology. A search for the words "situated learning" will show that the study of context awareness goes back at least as early as Charles Pierce and other American pragmatics. Linguistics have discussed context awareness as early as the formation of the discipline, as for Roman Jakobson one of the six functions of language was the "referential function" that emphasizes the role of context within which the communicative process takes place. Robertekraut (talk) 23:30, 24 April 2015 (UTC)

not clear what this paragraph means. I deleted it.[edit]

Context defines some rules of inter-relationship of features in processing any entities as a binding clause. Robertekraut (talk) 23:30, 24 April 2015 (UTC)