Talk:Culture of Kenya

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Culture of Kenya[edit]

Like many other multiple societies coalesced into nations by colonialist whims, Kenya's 'culture' is a cauldron of many primarily imiscible tribal cultures. Then again, if we re-appraise the term culture from its Latin root, "cultura" - to cultivate, to raise, to grow and to improve something, then the word refers to "the constant selection, preservation, application and encouragement of the improved or better versions of communal or social acts and expressions."

The culture of Kenya would thus refer to those aspects of Kenya's social and communal expression that have eased life among Kenya's society, increased national expression, pride and common prestige. Most of Kenya's longer-term subcultures remain rooted to their tribal origins. Resulting from British Colonization are accretions in music, language, religion, business and the arts, that have raised an unmistakable national identity.

While formally, Kenya does not recognize "Sheng" as a cultural outcome of her burgeoning national identity, this bastard tongue could easily be the clearest exemplifier of a culture that has developed from her people's enforced nationhood. The absolute majority of Kenya's youth are fluent in the ever-mutating lingua franca. Without much stretching of the imagination, it is the language of society, to the extent that finding communication that is fluent in either of the official national languages is the exception, rather than the norm.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.202.76.4 (talk) 09:03, 11 November 2013 (UTC)