Talk:Cyberbullying

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October 6, 2005 Articles for deletion Kept


Semi-protected edit request on 23 November 2016[edit]

Please remove the number= parameter from the citation "Psychosocial risk factors associated with cyberbullying among adolescents: A population-based study" in the section Finland, since it is redundant(causes CS1 error because it already has an issue= parameter) and the issue= parameter is more appropriate(this journal is published periodically(monthly)). 47.148.79.80 (talk) 19:59, 23 November 2016 (UTC)

 Done - Thanks for the suggestion - Arjayay (talk) 08:50, 24 November 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Needs Editing[edit]

It appears that cyber-bullying law may be limited in scope of applicability by SCOTUS Caselaw. (See RAV V. City of St. Paul [1992] and Snyder V. Phelps [2011] ) The cited cases make perfectly and unambiguously clear that mere "hate speech" is constitutionally protected speech under the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Hence, it would appear that Cyber-bullying laws by extension could not be directed at hate speech. The article needs to be edited to at least reflect a discussion of this important issue, as to address discrepancy of of information on Wikipedia, since these two cases were discussed in great detail on Wikipedia, in their own respective articles. As it sits, we now have Wikipedia apparently contradicting itself, which detracts from Wikipedia's credibility as an information source. 72.192.72.19 (talk) 20:26, 7 December 2016 (UTC)

GA Review[edit]

This review is transcluded from Talk:Cyberbullying/GA1. The edit link for this section can be used to add comments to the review.

Reviewer: ProgrammingGeek (talk · contribs) 15:32, 10 April 2017 (UTC)


Criteria[edit]

Review[edit]

  1. Well written:
    Criteria Notes Result
    (a) (prose) Continuity issues. The article sometimes feels disjointed, perhaps consider making it more prosaic. Fail Fail
    (b) (MoS) I can't see any MoS violations here, so I'm going to say yes to this criterion. Pass Pass
  2. Verifiable with no original research:
    Criteria Notes Result
    (a) (references) A few deadlinks (including references 8, 53, and 63), other references looking good. On hold On hold
    (b) (citations to reliable sources) While a lot of this article is sourced, some sections (specifically under 'awareness') need improved referencing. Fail Fail
    (c) (original research) No original research, except possibly the unsourced concerns above. Fail Fail
    (d) (copyvio and plagiarism) Everything looks good! There are a few red flags thrown by the copyvio detector, however, this is more likely just coincidence as they are terms that will be used in an article on this subject. Pass Pass
  3. Broad in its coverage:
    Criteria Notes Result
    (a) (major aspects) There is a good focus on all aspects of the topic in the article. Pass Pass
    (b) (focused) Focused enough so that the reader gets a view of its forms, responses, etc. Pass Pass
  4. Neutral: it represents viewpoints fairly and without editorial bias, giving due weight to each.
    Notes Result
    I can't feel any bias, seems to be compliant with WP:NPOV. Pass Pass
  5. Stable: it does not change significantly from day to day because of an ongoing edit war or content dispute.
    Notes Result
    No history of edit wars. Pass Pass
  6. Illustrated, if possible, by images:
    Criteria Notes Result
    (a) (images are tagged and non-free images have fair use rationales) No non-free images used. Pass Pass
    (b) (appropriate use with suitable captions) All okay. Pass Pass

Result[edit]

Result Notes
Fail Fail This is a good article, but not a Good Article. A few issues arose with the prose, deadlinks, and references. With these fixes I am sure this article can pass at the next assessment.

Discussion[edit]

Please add any related discussion here.

I would like to add actual Twitter examples from the 45th President of the United States of America, via Twitter profile @realDonaldTrump, as actual examples of cyber bullying. Twitter is a popular social media communications channel. The following examples, which took place on Twitter, should be viewed as 1 complete incident of cyber bullying directed at a couple of television talk show hosts from the MSNBC television network. Because Twitter has a character limitation, the comments were distributed over 2 "tweets".

  1. Cyber Bullying Example 1/2: https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/880408582310776832
  2. Cyber Bullying Example 2/2: https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/880410114456465411

Digitalprotector (talk) 17:57, 30 June 2017 (UTC)

Thanks! Let me know when you have time to start on the review and I will be available to start working on it. Shaded0 (talk) 20:30, 12 April 2017 (UTC)

Additional notes[edit]

  1. ^ Compliance with other aspects of the Manual of Style, or the Manual of Style mainpage or subpages of the guides listed, is not required for good articles.
  2. ^ Either parenthetical references or footnotes can be used for in-line citations, but not both in the same article.
  3. ^ This requirement is significantly weaker than the "comprehensiveness" required of featured articles; it allows shorter articles, articles that do not cover every major fact or detail, and overviews of large topics.
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  6. ^ The presence of images is not, in itself, a requirement. However, if images (or other media) with acceptable copyright status are appropriate and readily available, then some such images should be provided.

Cyber Bullying Statistics[edit]

Cyberbullying is just an easier access to attack another person. Girls tend to get bullied more through cyberbullying in their life 40.6% because girls are meaner. As technology is growing cyberbullying is getting worse to the point 20% of children think about committing suicide. When a child is getting bullied they either refuse or make excuses to not go to school or they don’t have friends anymore some children tend to get angry with everyone due to the emotions building up that they get aggressive. The side effects of cyberbullying children and young adults usually get into a depression or they get low self esteem some tend to harm themselves or commit suicide.

Sources

Raatma, Lucia. Cyberbullying. Danbury, CT: Children's, 2013. Print. Eserrano30 (talk) 21:47, 6 July 2017 (UTC)

Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. jd22292 (Jalen D. Folf) (talk) 22:39, 6 July 2017 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 26 July 2017[edit]

REQUEST FOR ADDITION OF ACTUAL SOCIAL MEDIA CYBERBULLYING EXAMPLES TO SOCIAL MEDIA SECTION BELOW (remove this line before publishing addition)

In social media[edit]

Cyberbullying can take place on social media sites such as Facebook, Myspace, and Twitter. "By 2008, 93% of young people between the ages of 12 and 17 were online. In fact, youth spend more time with media than any single other activity besides sleeping."[1] The last decade has witnessed a surge of cyberbullying, bullying that occurs through the use of electronic communication technologies, such as e-mail, instant messaging, social media, online gaming, or through digital messages or images sent to a cellular phone.[2]

There are many risks attached to social media sites, and cyberbullying is one of the larger risks. One million children were harassed, threatened or subjected to other forms of cyberbullying on Facebook during the past year, while 90 percent of social-media-using teens who have witnessed online cruelty say they have ignored mean behavior on social media, and 35 percent have done this frequently. 95 percent of social-media-using teens who have witnessed cruel behavior on social networking sites say they have seen others ignoring the mean behavior, and 55 percent witness this frequently.[3]

According to a 2013 Pew Research study, eight out of 10 teens who use social media share more information about themselves than they have in the past. This includes location, images, and contact information.[4] "The most recent case of cyber-bullying and illegal activity on Facebook involved a memorial page for the young boys who lost their lives to suicide due to anti-gay bullying. The page quickly turned into a virtual grave desecration and platform condoning gay teen suicide and the murdering of homosexuals. Photos were posted of executed homosexuals, desecrated photos of the boys who died and supposed snuff photos of gays who have been murdered. Along with this were thousands of comments encouraging murder sprees against gays, encouragement of gay teen suicide, death threats etc. In addition, the page continually exhibited pornography to minors."[5] In order to protect children, it's important that personal information such as age, birthday, school/church, phone number, etc. be kept confidential.[6]

Cyberbullying can also take place through the use of websites belonging to certain groups to effectively request the targeting of another individual or group. An example of this is the bullying of climate scientists and activists.[7][8][9]

Below is an actual example of real cyberbullying from the 45th President of the United States of America, via Twitter profile @realDonaldTrump. Twitter is a popular social media communications channel. The following examples, which took place on Twitter, should be viewed as 1 complete incident of cyberbullying directed at television talk show hosts from the MSNBC television network. Because Twitter has a character limitation, the comments were distributed over 2 "tweets".

Cyber Bullying Example 1/2: https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/880408582310776832 Cyber Bullying Example 2/2: https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/880410114456465411 Digitalprotector (talk) 18:23, 26 July 2017 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Teen and Young Adult Internet Use". Pew Internet Project. Retrieved 5 January 2015. 
  2. ^ Kowalski, Giumetti, Schroeder & Lattanner, R. M., , G. W., A. N., M. R. (2014). "Bullying in the digital age: A critical review and meta-analysis of cyberbullying research among youth.". Psychological Bulletin: 1073–1137. – via google scholar. 
  3. ^ "Cyberbullying Statistics". Internet Safety 101. Retrieved 5 January 2015. 
  4. ^ "Teens, Social Media, and Privacy". Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  5. ^ Kalli Amorphous. "Demand For Facebook's Response To Cyber-Bullying On Their Pages". Change.org. 
  6. ^ "Stranger Danger: Protecting Your Children from Cyber Bullying, Sexting, & Social Media". Retrieved 15 November 2015. 
  7. ^ Cite error: The named reference scientificamerican-climate was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  8. ^ Cite error: The named reference timemag-climate was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  9. ^ Cite error: The named reference latrobe-climate was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
Your request involves adding the final paragraph about Donald Trump. The occurrence of one public figure using social media to criticize another public figure is fairly common in politics and generally wouldn't be considered cyberbullying and therefore off topic for this article. This appears to be an attempt to shoehorn gratuitous criticism of Donald Trump into this article. Criticism of Trump's use of social media would be better incorporated into the article Donald Trump on social media. Deli nk (talk) 18:40, 26 July 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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