Talk:DNA vaccination

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Bird Flu results[edit]

Amended 1st para which stated 'no results', with news circa June 2006 re bird flu DNA vaccine from PowderMed: [1].

Added reference to the recent approval of a DNA vaccine for protection of horses from West Nile virus. [2]

Complete rewrite[edit]

I've done a complete rewrite of this article. Biochemza 20:22, 21 November 2007 (UTC)

TODO: Add section on Safety[edit]

Including: Safety Issues, Integration, Tolerance, Autoimmunity, Anti-DNA antibodies. Biochemza 22:06, 21 November 2007 (UTC)

Introduction/lead[edit]

Hi there, the introduction should be part of the summary, this is explained in the guide to authors on layout - Wikipedia:Guide to layout, part of the main Wikipedia:Manual of Style. Hope this helps, Tim Vickers (talk) 22:52, 21 November 2007 (UTC)

Surely this lead paragraph is too long though? Biochemza 15:12, 23 November 2007 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Biochemza (talkcontribs)

Yes, it does need to be condensed a little bit, but the lead isn't like the abstract of a paper, more a cross between an abstract and an introduction. Have a look at some of the other scientific featured articles, such as bacteria, DNA or enzyme to get an example of format. Tim Vickers (talk) 18:15, 23 November 2007 (UTC)

Human Applications?[edit]

"One DNA vaccine has been approved for human use." Is it possible to provide a reference for this statement in the Introduction? The rest of the article seems to indicate that there any human applications are currently experimental only. 82.173.146.134 (talk) 09:34, 5 February 2017 (UTC)

Zika[edit]

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602073/us-government-starts-test-of-zika-vaccine-in-humans/?utm_campaign=socialflow&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=post

U.S. Government Starts Test of Zika Vaccine in Humans

Scientists are close behind an outbreak of a mosquito-spread disease in the U.S. with a possible fix.

by Antonio Regalado August 2, 2016

The U.S. government on Tuesday for the first time tested an experimental vaccine against the Zika virus on an American volunteer.

The start of the vaccine trial, at the National Institutes of Health in Maryland, comes as officials were racing to contain an outbreak of the Zika virus in Miami, where it has already infected at least 14 people.

A vaccine could roll back the epidemic from U.S. borders, but it won’t be known for months if the government’s vaccine is safe, and it could take years longer to prove it’s effective.

The study involves a novel type of vaccination called a DNA vaccine, in which genes from the virus are shot under high pressure into a person’s arm. While easy to design, no DNA vaccine has ever reached commercialization. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.143.68.7 (talk) 09:31, 3 August 2016 (UTC)