Talk:Daniel Boone

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Controversy on Birthdate[edit]

Regarding the confusing use of birthdate calendars in this entry.

Oct 22, 1734 v. Nov 2, 1734 - Viewing the cited references it appears that the dates are correct but the PRIMARY reference date is Oct 22 which in fact is the OLD STYLE. Shouldn't the Primary referenced date be relative to the audience (new style)?

I appreciated the lesson in Julian to Gregorian conversion, thanks (+11 days for the 1700's) - but all I wanted to know was when he was born relative to his peers.

This entry uses Julian and Gregorian dates intermixed and is confusing.

If other contemporaries of the time use the New Style as the primary reference of birthdate should't this? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Inquiringmynd (talkcontribs) 06:11, 26 January 2009 (UTC)

What are some good books about this man?[edit]

147.9.201.80 22:22, 4 April 2006 (UTC)

Some great books on Daniel Boone are listed below. I have read all of them and recommend them highly. Daniel Boone is a fascinating historical character.

  • Bakeless, John (1965, original 1939). Daniel Boone. Harrison, PA: Stackpole Co.
  • Boone, Daniel (1967, original 1784). The adventures of Colonel Daniel Boone, formerly a hunter: Containing a narrative of the wars of Kentucky with the discovery, purchase, and settlement of Kentucky, and the Piankashaw council, 1784, and Territory of North American Indians, and the Rights of Land in Kentucky. Old Chelicothe, 1967 reprint of John Filson's History of Kentucky as reprinted by Gilbert Imlay in his Topographical Description. 1797. Alvin Salisbury ed. [This is the original (and largely fictionalized) account of Daniel Boone]
  • Draper, Lyman (1998). The life of Daniel Boone. Ted Franklin Belue ed. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books. [This is one of the best sources on Daniel Boone. If you can only have three sources, this should be one of them]
  • Lofaro, Michael (2003). Daniel Boone: an American Life. Lexington, KY: The UP of Kentucky.
  • Sweeney, J. Gray (1992). The Columbus of the Woods: Daniel Boone and the typology of Manifest Destiny. St. Louis, MO: The Washington University Gallery of Art. [This book contains beautiful imagery of Daniel Boone and frontier imagery]

E. Conroy (4/4/06)147.9.201.80 22:22, 4 April 2006 (UTC) wow

Missing from this list is John Mack Faragher's Daniel Boone: The Life and Legend of an American Pioneer (1992), the best scholarly biography, written in a very accessible style. Even Michael Lofaro, whose shorter biography is also good, calls Faragher's book the "best biography of Boone published to date". • Kevin (complaints?) 05:59, 5 September 2006 (UTC)

Another interesting read: IIRC William Carlos Williams "translated" Filson's material on Boone in his (WCW's) "In The American Grain" (New Directions, 2009). It's a great chapter in the book. 98.30.49.10 (talk) 10:41, 19 October 2009 (UTC)

Folklore[edit]

I am removing some controversial statements and commentary from the Folklore section, as the commentary added by 64.83.45.90 belongs on this discussion page, not in the article -- MarkBrooks 13:08, 18 October 2005 (UTC)

  • When he first met his wife Rebecca, he thought she was a deer in the dark woods, but couldn't shoot her because he never saw a deer with blue eyes before. He tracked her to her home and was smitten when he saw her. He continued to follow her around until she consented to marry him. [I challenge the source of this statement as well. Where has this "deer with blue eyes" tale about Rebecca ever been recorded, besides here?]
  • He claimed he once killed a Yahoo, a hairy giant. [I challenge this -- where has it ever been reported, even anecdotedly, that Daniel Boone claimed he killed a Yahoo? Besides here.]
I am re-doing the above changes, which unfortunately got caught up in the Scottish-American (cat) revert wars -- MarkBrooks 02:27, 21 October 2005 (UTC)
Just to clear up some old business: User:64.83.45.90 asked, "Where has this 'deer with blue eyes' tale about Rebecca ever been recorded, besides here?" The answer is: pretty much everywhere. It's a common Boone folk tale, recorded in most biographies (the modern ones of course identify it as an improbable folk tale). The "Yahoo" story can also be easily found -- apparently it's something Boone told his young grandchildren to amuse them. --Kevin Myers | (complaint dept.) 06:26, 29 June 2006 (UTC)

A supposed cast of the tree he famously engraved is located in the Grandfather Mountain museum in Linville, NC, near Boone, NC. The town of Boone, NC is named for Daniel Boone. Daniel Boone is also portrayed in the ongoing performance of the fictional outdoor drama "Horn in the West" in Boone, NC. There are two memorials to Daniel Boone in Boone, NC: a statue of Boone sitting next to some coon hounds and a campfire in front of Newland Hall near the intersection of Rivers Street and Stadium Drive, and a memorial obelisk at the corner of Rivers Street and Moretz Street.

Throughout Virginia, West Virginia, and Kentucky there are lots of local legends regarding Boone. A former Charleston, WV hotel was named the Daniel Boone reflecting some locals legends. Does anyone else know any of these to confirm? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.83.223.224 (talk) 15:47, 27 January 2008 (UTC)

A tree purported to be inscribed by Daniel Boone is also located in the museum of The Filson Historical Society in Louisville, Kentucky. The inscription reads "D. Boon kill a bar, 1803." The tree was discovered in the early 20th century, cut down, and is now preserved in a glass case at the Filson.

towns named for Daniel Boone[edit]

Are all the towns named Danville [Ohio Ky? and Illinois and even Caifornia] like town named Bonville named after Daniel Boone?

GA[edit]

This article is quite clearly a GA. I'm surprised that someone didn't nominate it earlier. Some P. Erson 15:54, 9 September 2006 (UTC)

Daniel Boone's relatives[edit]

I am a relative of Daniel Boone. His son is my mothers Grandfather. Daniel Boone Kinnison. I have his signature book and what believe to be rebecca'a bible.. How cool is that!! The favorite topic of "drive-by" additions to this article seems to involve supposed relatives of Daniel Boone. The most recent ones are:

  1. George and Mary Boone were also the common ancestors of singer Loretta Lynn and her husband. [1]
  2. A cousin Thomas Boone was married to a Susannah Brumfield; reportably a distant relative of Susannah Brumfield married a Nancy Lincoln-aunt of President Abraham Lincoln.[2]
  3. Mary Boone was said to have been a Morgan and a relative of General Daniel Morgan of the Revolutionary War. [3]

The third one had the advantage of being referenced. However, these alleged connections are all trivia. The best way to determine if a relationship is significant enough to include in an encyclopedia article is: do Boone biographers mention it? Bakeless and Faragher, for example, did not find Boone's supposed kinship to Daniel Morgan significant enough to mention in 300 or 400 pages of biography, which suggests it's too trivial for our encylopedia article. If you have come here to add some distant relative of Boone to the article, take a look at the biographies first to see if Boone scholars found the connection notable enough to mention. —Kevin 02:51, 3 November 2006 (UTC)

This is a spurious argument, that something is not encyclopedic because it is not included in a biography. They are not equal, the simple test is "is something not biographical because it is not in an encyclopedia" doesn't make sense. Genealogical connections of consequence are almost always non-trivial, historic and of encyclopedic value.Tstrobaugh 16:41, 3 November 2006 (UTC)
Nonsense. An encyclopedia article on a person is biography in miniature. If published scholars thought a piece of information was too trivial to be included in a full-length biography, that's a pretty good indication that the information is indeed trivial. We're here to summarize what scholars have published on various topics, not to second guess their decisions. Also, keep in mind this dictum: "Wikipedia is not an indiscriminate collection of items of information. That something is 100% true does not mean it is suitable for inclusion in Wikipedia." —Kevin 22:20, 3 November 2006 (UTC)
It's not nonsense. You’re wrong that an article in an encyclopedia is a miniature biography. At least now we can put our finger on the problem. How did you develop this opinion? Let's start here; Define the terms biographical and encyclopedic. Is one narrow and one more encompassing? Of course a biography will not deal with other peoples lives (that were not a direct influence), an encyclopedia however by its very nature will include relevant historical information. Genealogy is not indiscriminant, if you can show that it is I'll withdraw.Tstrobaugh 04:41, 4 November 2006 (UTC)
"Genealogical connections of consequence are almost always non-trivial, historic and of encyclopedic value." / "Genealogy is not indiscriminant." I agree completely. That's why I have no problem with this article mentioning Boone's parents, brother, and children. Those people are obviously "relevant" and "of consequence". But are Daniel Morgan and Loretta Lynn "relevant" and "of consequence"? Please demonstrate that they are Tstrobaugh. Punctured Bicycle 13:40, 30 November 2006 (UTC)

I too am related to Daniel Boone. He is my sixth great-uncle, I believe. It was pretty cool to see him featured on the front page. And with that, I have nothing more to contribute. Baseballbaker23 (talk) 08:13, 26 January 2008 (UTC)

My great great grandmother was Elen Frances Fee, born in Indiana 7/3/1840. I have a letter from my great grandfather that says “The following is quoted from a letter written by my sister several years ago before she passed away. The Nanticoke Indians of Maryland were destroyed by the colonists. However, one of the Nanticoke Indians married a cousin of Daniel Boone and later their granddaughter Ellen Frances Fee was born.“ We have no information about her parents at all. Any ideas how I might be able to figure out her lineage? Thank you. Kelli Rawson — Preceding unsigned comment added by Kelli Rawson (talkcontribs) 18:06, 2 May 2012 (UTC)

Timeline[edit]

I liked the timeline that had been added to article. Does anyone else think its removal was necessary and, if so, why? 71.104.102.155 05:59, 13 November 2007 (UTC)

The entries on the timeline were very good, although some were unsourced. The problem is the formatting, which created a massive infobox which trailed down the side of the article for about half its length. That's an aesthetic nightmare. This is a featured article and should reflect Wikipedia's best practices. If someone is still interested in having a Boone timeline, follow the examples of other featured articles. The Timeline of Mary Wollstonecraft is a recent featured example. —Kevin Myers 13:30, 13 November 2007 (UTC)
I actually don't think the timeline was the aesthetic nightmare that you claim it to be. However, I'll agree to leave it off. The Wollstonecraft timeline is very nicely done, and should be a model to what could be done for Boone or, for that matter, any other significant historical figure. - 71.104.102.155 05:19, 14 November 2007 (UTC)

50th birthday in 1784?[edit]

Uh... TJSwoboda (talk) 00:43, 26 January 2008 (UTC)

Yes. Unfortunately, someone added bogus birthday information recently, so the numbers were off. —Kevin Myers 05:06, 26 January 2008 (UTC)

Redundancy and vandalism[edit]

Someone might notice that I made an edit to this article that was a redundancy of what Curtis Clark had just done. (That observer might also notice that this note is very similar to what I posted on that editor's user page). This was unintentional--we apparently were both working on restoring the bottom half of the article at the same time, but Curtis Clark's edit happened a few seconds before mine. I would like to point out, however, that I suspect that the cut wasn't vandalism, as was stated. The Wikipedia article on vandalism says, "Vandalism is any addition, removal, or change of content made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of Wikipedia" (emphasis is from the article). I suspect this was an unintentional error in a good faith edit. I point this out because calling someone a "vandal" or their work "vandalism" has been a part of many misunderstandings and hurt feelings here. But I assume the comment of vandalism was also made in good faith. Thanks for your patience! Wakedream (talk) 19:04, 26 January 2008 (UTC)

British English in Featured Article summary[edit]

I noticed a difference between the summary on this page, and the featured article summary on the front page.

Boone is most famous for his exploration and settlement of what is now the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky

is from the FA summary. Why was the word "State" changed to "Commonwealth?" Isn't that almost exclusively a British term for territory? ataricom (talk) 23:50, 26 January 2008 (UTC)

Look at the article Kentucky, especially at the seal there. A few members of the union follow the pattern. Bill (talk) 00:08, 27 January 2008 (UTC)
Yeah, Kentucky is one of four U.S. states officially styled "Commonwealths"; see Commonwealth (United States). Either "commonwealth" or "state" can be used when describing those states: "commonwealth" is more formal, while "state" is more, um, common. —Kevin Myers 00:22, 27 January 2008 (UTC)

Proposal to remove date-autoformatting[edit]

Dear fellow contributors

MOSNUM no longer encourages date autoformatting, having evolved over the past year or so from the mandatory to the optional after much discussion there and elsewhere of the disadvantages of the system. Related to this, MOSNUM prescribes rules for the raw formatting, irrespective of whether or not dates are autoformatted. MOSLINK and CONTEXT are consistent with this.

There are at least six disadvantages in using date-autoformatting, which I've capped here:

Removal has generally been met with positive responses by editors. I'm seeking feedback about this proposal to remove it from the main text (using a script) in about a week's time on a trial basis. The original input formatting would be seen by all WPians, not just the huge number of visitors; it would be plain, unobtrusive text in the prevailing format for the article, which would give greater prominence to the high-value links. BTW, anyone has the right to object, and my aim is not to argue against people on the issue. Tony (talk) 12:37, 30 July 2008 (UTC)

Boone, NC[edit]

I notice that there was no mentionings of Boone, NC. This quiet yet quickly growing town is found in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina. It is the location that Daniel Boone and Squire Boone fequent to go hunting. We are very proud to be named after the Famous Boones. We are so dedicated our local outdoor amphitheatre is called, the Daniel Boone Amphitheatre. Every summer since 1951 an outdoor drama showcases an important time in the Revolutionary War Era, the battle of King's Mountain. In the 2 hrs long show Daniel Boone, played by wes Martain, helps the colonist of the Appalachian gain a relationship with the local Native American. By helping create this relationship in the story line, the Native American give the colonist the "heads-up" about the soldiers gather at King's Mountain and their plan to concord the over mountain men. we all know how the story end. Colonist win!

Would it be possible to have some form of this information added to the wikipedia page about Daniel Boone.

thank you, Virginia Roseman74.251.229.198 (talk) 17:30, 23 January 2009 (UTC)

Origin of term "The Boonies"[edit]

I know "Boondocks" comes from the Tagalog word bundok meaning mountain, but is "the boonies," meaning roughly the same thing (backwoods) traceable back to Daniel Boone, or just a modification of boondocks? 20.137.18.50 (talk) 16:31, 20 August 2009 (UTC)

daniel boone 1734-1820[edit]

daniel boone was a man who explored the western part of U.S. and settled which is now kentucky he led 200 men to start settling in kentucky and led 20,000 people through the western trail. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wikidude36 (talkcontribs) 14:06, 3 May 2010 (UTC)

Zip's fiddle?[edit]

I know very little about Boone other than it was claimed at the time that one of the most famous sideshow preformers, Zip the pinhead, played a fiddle that had once belonged to Boone. The previous history of Zip's fiddle was almost certainly an invention of Zip or his manager in order to get more interest in Zip and more people in to see his act. However, the fact that they would make such a claim, truthful or not shows the cultural impact Boone must have had at the time and as such mentioning this fact somewhere in the article (in the legend section perhaps?) might be a good idea to further improve the article.--Shearluck (talk) 12:57, 17 May 2011 (UTC)


I have Red Bone Coon Hounds that are said to be direct descendants of Daniel Boone's Coon Hound. I cannot find any documentation of any sort about Boone's dog. Any one out there have any information? Jen Swanner jenswanner@yahoo.com — Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.163.94.189 (talk) 14:36, 9 January 2013 (UTC)

Boones Children[edit]

How many children did Daniel Boone have, I know two sons were killed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.86.71.241 (talk) 12:10, 9 October 2011 (UTC)

Participation in Genocide of Native Americans[edit]

I am baffled how an article on Daniel Boone does not even mention his role, direct and indirect, in the genocide of native peoples who’s land he was “exploring” and “settling” — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.248.65.8 (talk) 22:26, 27 February 2012 (UTC)

I agree that this issue needs to be addressed in the article.--Haruo (talk) 04:42, 28 February 2012 (UTC)
If anyone initiates a section on that subject, please source it. And with the proper inline citations...Personally, I would be cautious. I've read about Boone and there isn't much - if anything - to indicate that he had any intention to 'eradicate' Native Americans (thus, the "genocide")... He was a product of his time, born in N.America with no ties to Europe beyond whatever stories his parents might have told him, and wrapped up in the conflicts where he was (early local Indian skirmishes) and issues...Associating Boone with the word "genocide" is an awfully strong claim. It will require scholarly historical references, not political (PC) or sociological BS...Engr105th (talk) 03:04, 6 May 2012 (UTC)

Image for article?[edit]

Would this be a good addition to the article? Statue of Daniel Boone at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.16.55.71 (talk) 21:54, 10 May 2012 (UTC)

Could be...it accurately avoids the coonskin-cap impression so many have from TV/movies. But it should include a lable stating the location, ASU...Engr105th (talk) 22:47, 12 May 2012 (UTC)
I've added the picture in a place I thought might be appropriate. While we're on the topic of the town of Boone, I also added in a reference to Horn in the West, an outdoor drama revolving around Daniel Boone. DavidSSabb (talk) 01:04, 18 May 2012 (UTC)
That spot looks fine to me! Engr105th (talk) 13:32, 22 May 2012 (UTC)