Talk:Delocalized electron

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Delocalization[edit]

Physicists, please help us now and create an article for delocalization as is. I don't think that delocalization per se and delocalized electrons are equivalent. --Vuo 00:34, 2 January 2007 (UTC)

Image size problem =[edit]

Just a heads up to whomever reads this, but the graphic is larger than the resolution of my screen. I'm running Firefox 3.5.3 on Vista SP1 in 1280x760 resolution. Don't know if it's just me or not, but I figure a more experienced wiki user would know what to do. Also, I may be able to help flesh out this article a bit in the future, I'm currently doing undergraduate research at Central Michigan University that involves carbon nano-structures and localization/delocalization. Asrrin29 (talk) 20:45, 1 October 2009 (UTC)

Fixed. DMacks (talk) 21:41, 1 October 2009 (UTC)

Benzene isn't a delocalized system[edit]

To quote from WP's own page on benzene:

"The delocalized picture of benzene has been contested by Cooper, Gerratt and Raimondi in their article published in 1986 in the journal Nature. They showed that the electrons in benzene are almost certainly localized, and the aromatic properties of benzene originate from spin coupling rather than electron delocalization.[32] This view has been supported in the next-year Nature issue,[33][34][35] but it has been slow to permeate the general chemistry community."

32: Cooper, David L.; Gerratt, Joseph; Raimondi, Mario (1986). "The electronic structure of the benzene molecule". Nature 323 (6090): 699. doi:10.1038/323699a0. 33: Pauling, Linus (1987). "Electronic structure of the benzene molecule". Nature 325 (6103): 396. doi:10.1038/325396d0. 34: Messmer, Richard P.; Schultz, Peter A. (1987). "The electronic structure of the benzene molecule". Nature 329 (6139): 492. doi:10.1038/329492a0. 35: Harcourt, Richard D. (1987). "The electronic structure of the benzene molecule". Nature 329 (6139): 491.

Surely this deserves at least a mention? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.147.66.111 (talk) 13:36, 21 April 2012 (UTC)

Delocalization in insulators[edit]

(Disclaimer: I'm a solid state physicist, not a chemist). In my understanding, many insulating materials do in fact have highly delocalized electron states (in the sense of Bloch states), it's just that these states usually remain filled all the time and so they don't participate in charge transport. The example of a `localized' system given in the article, diamond, actually has very wide (~10 eV) valence bands, and the electron velocities in these bands can be as high as in metals.[1] IMHO a better example of a localized system might be an ionic crystal like quartz.

I guess my question is, does delocalization in chemistry vocabulary actually require the ability to conduct charge? If so then it isn't just a property of the molecular orbital but also dependent on filling (Fermi level and all that). — Preceding unsigned comment added by Nanite (talkcontribs) 21:47, 24 May 2013 (UTC)