Talk:Devil's Club

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Removal of unsourced content[edit]

I removed the following unsourced content: "Burning devil's club on a fire as an incense is also believed to chase away evil spirits." By whom? When? --Walter Siegmund (talk) 04:45, 5 June 2007 (UTC)

I removed text plagiarized from NPR.org, reorganized the remaining text, and made a few other edits. Hopefully this cleans the article up enough to remove the accuracy/neutrality/clean-up/references banners. If someone else agrees with me, we can go ahead and remove them. -- BlueCanoe (talk) 22:50, 12 March 2008 (UTC)

Pojar, Jim, and MacKinnon, Andy. Plants of Coastal British Columbia. 1994. BC Ministry of Forests and Lone Pine Publishing. ISBN 1-55105-042-0. P. 82 (Devil's Club). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.189.205.5 (talk) 06:46, 12 November 2007 (UTC)

Added Pojar & MacKinnon reference to article. -- BlueCanoe (talk) 22:50, 12 March 2008 (UTC)

devil's club noted on Michigan's Isle Royal in 1913 report[edit]

here's the site.

from the Botanical Gazette, Vol 55, number 1, page 15 -- devil's club noted at being "abundant."

glycyl acetic acid[edit]

I believe the barbs contain glycyl acetic acid, or something like that. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Mwalle (talkcontribs) 19:50, 7 February 2008 (UTC)

"Urban Legends" or total bollocks?[edit]

I have removed this section for two reasons. First, stories about a plant that grows in the woods are not really "urban legends", and secondly, it directly contradicted the paragraph right before it while citing the same source. Seems likely to be, as we say in Alaska, bullshit. Beeblebrox (talk) 08:17, 16 December 2008 (UTC)

I read the source, kept the content that was supported by the source and removed unsourced content and redundancy. The Tilford book is not a high quality source; it appears to be intended as a field guide for herbalists, contains no footnotes and cites other compilations (rather than research journals) in its bibliography. Walter Siegmund (talk) 19:48, 16 December 2008 (UTC)

diabetes[edit]

Anonymous editor 71.227.121.82 deleted the following content. While I, too, am suspicious of the accuracy of this statement, I wanted to paste the text in question here so that someone with more knowledge of medicine can evaluate it:

Clinical studies have verified the plants effectiveness as a treatment for the early stages of diabetes.[1][2]

--BlueCanoe (talk) 15:20, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

  • The two sources it purports to cite are clearly not scientific papers or medical journals but rather field guides to plants, so I think removing it is the right move. Beeblebrox (talk) 21:04, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

how it spreads[edit]

I've asked this same question at WikiProject Plants, but maybe someone watching here knows. I wanted to add content on how Devil's club spreads, where one plant can appear to be many separate plants, but I'm not sure if the connecting stems are considered rhizomes or stolons. Anyone know about that? I can provide pictures if needed. Beeblebrox (talk) 19:33, 8 July 2009 (UTC)

I found no mention of stolons or rhizomes in Hitchcock and Cronquist or Pojar and MacKinnon. Walter Siegmund (talk) 21:14, 8 July 2009 (UTC)
Well darn. Beeblebrox (talk) 22:23, 8 July 2009 (UTC)
One of the helpful folks at WikiProject Plants found a ref that explains it actually forms clonal colonies, I have now added a section to the article reflecting this. Beeblebrox (talk) 22:30, 10 July 2009 (UTC)
Thank you. That is a fascinating article. It surprises me that it rarely starts from seed since it puts a lot of effort into attracting pollinators, e.g., taxobox image, and fruit production. Walter Siegmund (talk) 03:24, 11 July 2009 (UTC)

Entheogen? Changed to Adaptogen[edit]

Under uses: "Because Devil's club is related to American Ginseng, some think that the plant is an entheogen? ("mind enhancer"). The plant has been harvested for this purpose and marketed widely as 'Alaskan ginseng'[4]"

I think the author meant "adaptogen" not "entheogen", this sentence comes up on various websites but I cant find the original source as the reference just says Google.

I do have a different source saying it was used traditionally as an entheogen, but in the above context it doesn't make sense as American Ginseng is considered an adaptogen not a entheogen and "mind enhancer" describes an adaptogen. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Zacharyah (talkcontribs) 20:19, 18 May 2011 (UTC)

Not a food[edit]

I've found no indication that this is ever a food - it's only a medicine. [1] -Legaia (talk) 18:38, 28 February 2013 (UTC)


Is a Food, as Tea or Coffee is a food[edit]

Native people used the plant for more than medical uses, not everyone that drinks its tea is using it as a medicine. Although coffee is a diuretic and a stimulant, would you say that it's a drug and not a food? No, one would say that coffee would fall in the food category. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.134.134.44 (talk) 15:56, 1 May 2013 (UTC)

Spines or Prickles?[edit]

The article consistently talks about Devil's club having "spines", but there's a difference between Thorns, spines, and prickles and I can't find a clear reference which is correct. I suspect it has prickles, but without a reference I'd rather not change it. Bennetto (talk) 21:40, 4 June 2013 (UTC)

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference Pojar was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ Gregory L. Tilford: Edible and Medicinal Plants of the West Mountain Press Publishing Company, 1997, ISBN 0-87842-359-1