Talk:Do Right Woman, Do Right Man

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WikiProject Songs (Rated Start-class)
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WikiProject R&B and Soul Music (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
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Song Section[edit]

The last sentence of the first paragraph of this section doesn't make sense. Apparently a lot of edits have been applied to this paragraph with the result that this sentence starts with "Eventually the song equal to Franklin's hit cover..." I think the problem is that the editors want to avoid quoting the Allmusic review verbatim.

The other point is the quote from the Allmusic review which says that Otis Redding said that Aretha Franking stole Respect from him which isn't quite the same as the quote in the Wikipedia article on Respect that says she took it away from him. Mikenlesley (talk) 10:14, 24 January 2014 (UTC)

Agree on both counts. On the first, the original word where "equal to" now stands seems to have been "harken" (e.g. Revision as of 06:24, 30 September 2011 Crisco 1492) which I don't understand. Maybe something to do with the common theme of the lyrics? On the second, I agree that the meaning is significantly different. Unfortunately, neither the Janovitz Allmusic page nor the WP "Respect" page give a source. Cathalwoods (talk) 06:54, 10 July 2014 (UTC)

Production: Fight between Ted White and a Musician at the Session[edit]

Is there any reliable citation for the assertion made in this section that it was Melvin Lastie who got in a fight with Ted White at the session at Muscle Shoals? All documentation that I have seen (e.g., the books Memphis Boys: The Story of American Studios and Out of Whiteness: Color, Politics, and Culture and an interview with Spooner Oldham, David Hood, and Jimmy Johnson, all of whom were at the session, that is available online) say that it was trumpter Ken Laxton that got into the initial fight with Ted White, and some go on to say that White got into another fight with Rick Hall later at the hotel. There's not even any indication Lastie was at the session at all; one of White's issues was that the players were all white, even though there was supposed to be a integrated horn section. If Lastie (who was African American) had been there, White wouldn't have had that objection.

What'd She Say???[edit]

"Patricia Hill Collins writes that it has a feminist message, urging African-American men to respect women as their equals and not follow the then-common belief that it is "a man's world" by using or abusing them; she also writes that the song urges men to be loyal, responsible, and "sexually expressive".[8] "African American" men? This is an outrageously racist statement And no, it doesn't matter if this "Patrica Hill" may be Black herself(?)! Male, so-called "misogny" simply is(!) among most species: For her to single out Black men (..like, what, of those only in America? Canada, Africa, South America, or Europe?) is an outright attack, and employs a racial "Transferrence" of the violence that whites wholly heap on, and victimize all women and men of color in America, no matter where they come from globally, falsely blaming the "victim" itself for both their own mayhem, and "absolving" the original perpetrators (whites)! Ms. Hill-Collins (especially, if she were Black,) employs a "soft" version of ye olde "I's with you,'Boss'" slaving attitude of appeasing her employers by denigrating Black (her own 'people?) men! Nowhere in the lyrics does it make a distinctive reference to the African American male, since (allegedly)this composition was written by white (and wholly "You-Wish") Jerry Wexler! And, lastly, there is nothing even slightly "F-E-M-I-N-I-S-T" about the song, as all females lovingly (yes, most times desperately) pleads for her man's "A-T-T-E-N-T-I-O-N", and not decrying any sort of 'A-B-U-S-E'!--184.248.0.155 (talk) 23:50, 1 February 2016 (UTC)Veryverser


Finally, it is Sort of an "irony" that this Patricia Hill Collins should make this bogus attack on African American men, this idiot conventently foregoes the "incident" in which Aretha Franklin (and her husband as well, as these matters go,) was allegedly sexually assaulted (yes, a strange man not of a married woman's accquaintance openly "flirts" with her, and she, obviously uncomfortable with such "advances", is "A-S-S-A-U-L-T", pure and simple; that a Balck woman was acoosted thus by allegedly one or more (southern) white males, and brazenly in public, makes this all the more scathing: Any where in the world, but in this case, in the southern states, this would be enough to get the assailant killed, especially back in those days, be the assaulter white, black, red, brown (what tiny few of the latter "colored" immigrants were just that: not on anyone's socio-cultural "radar",) All of this is the reason that the whole incident is "shrouded" in "uncertainty", and "ambiguity"!!! --184.248.0.155 (talk) 00:27, 2 February 2016 (UTC)Veryverser