Talk:Dodger Stadium

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Corporate names[edit]

Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Fenway Park are neither corporate names for starters User:Levineps 07:25, 19 February 2006 (UTC)

This is fixed...maybe someone could start a comprohensive list. Antonrojo 16:04, 24 February 2006 (UTC)
Just scan the 30 current ballparks at List_of_Major_League_Baseball_stadiums. I count: 16 named for a company, 8 named for a person, 6 named for the team and/or location. Some are debatable where a person ran a company of the same name. I question whether it's even worth bringing up in this article. Wahkeenah 00:17, 25 February 2006 (UTC)

Paul Brown Stadium is not a baseball stadium. It is football-only. User:ndifranco

Dimensions[edit]

From *[1]

"Dodger Stadium has changed very little over the years. In 1969 home plate was moved forward ten feet in hopes of generating more home runs. (This was the era of pitcher supremacy, you may recall.) The distance to center field was reduced from 410 feet to 400 feet, but there was no change in the left and right field corners because the fences were at a 45 degree angle to the baselines. This shift enhanced visibility for fans in the upper decks, but fans in the lower-deck box seats were farther away from the infield. Indeed, from 1969 until 1999, Dodger Stadium had one of the roomiest foul territories of any stadium. Another oddity is that in 1983 the "400" marker was removed from straightaway center field and replaced by two "395" markers just to the right and left of center field. There was no actual change in the distances, but some people were confused anyway."

This is what I've always understood... so should the dimensions reflect the true distance to center field? Or what's on the signs that aren't in center field? I vote for true distance.

Jenolen 17:26, 18 April 2006 (UTC)

  • How do you know for sure what the "true distance" really is? Have you put a tape measure to it? Wahkeenah 17:31, 18 April 2006 (UTC)

OK, some time back I had written the chronology of what I called the "posted dimensions" (that's officially known as "hedging"), and someone apparently thought it was too cluttered, and zapped it. Fine. Instead of redisplaying all of it, I'll try to simplify it. For this discussion, I am talking about left field. As the park is symmetrical, right field was done the same way, just mirrored. When I say "left of CF" I am referring to the centerfield end of the bleachers. Initially there were two CF signs like that, but none in true straightaway CF. Other than moving the plate out 10 feet in 1969, I don't think the outfield has actually changed, so the re-postings were presumably based on re-measurements. That's why I say, how do we really know? There was some story that the Phillies distances were re-measured this year and re-posted, thus confusing everyone. Fenway's famous 315 to left suddenly became 310 a few years ago, confirming what students of aerial photography had suspected all along. Griffith Stadium had the right field distance too long by 8 feet for most of its history. Maybe some micro-study of a Google Maps or Terra Server photo of Dodger Stadium would answer this question. Any volunteers?

  • 1962: LF 330, LCF 370-380-390, left of CF 410
  • 1969: LF 330, LCF 360-370-380, left of CF 400
  • 1973: LF 330, LCF 360-370-380, left of CF 395
  • 1977: LF 330, LCF 360-370-385, left of CF 395
  • 1999: LF 330, LCF 360-375, straightaway CF 395

By the way, the quoted writer at the top of the page got the year wrong by 10 on the 400-to-395 switch, and also got the fact wrong about the placement of the CF markers. There were two of them from day 1 until 1999 when the new ownership re-did them. I expect I could find some old photos that demonstrate how they looked early on.

Now I'll give you my opinion of what the real distances were and are. First, I think they were approximations. I recall that someone put a tape measure to it once and discovered left field was only like 327-something. I think "true" LCF was 385 and then became 375, as it is currently marked. And I think straightaway center was 410 and that the bleacher corners were 405, but they posted them as 410, and just didn't do it straightaway because the signs were white and that could have interfered with the batters' sight lines. In 1969 straightaway became 400 and the signs were adjusted. Then someone measured the actual points of the signs, and re-marked them as 395. Then they made a single 395 sign to center (painted black), when the true distance was probably 400, which is the point you're trying to make. Again I say, all we know for sure is what's posted on the walls, which may or may not be true. d:) Wahkeenah 02:34, 19 April 2006 (UTC)

Voila. Here's a portion of a wide-angle postcard that I bought in 1965, so presumably it was from 1964 or earlier. The 1962 posted markers are shown, obviously not high-resolution, but hopefully you can make them out. Wahkeenah 05:04, 19 April 2006 (UTC)

Someone should correct the fact section claiming two 395 foot signs left and right of center field. In fact there is only a single 395 foot sign located only a foot or so away from dead center field. Without additional irrefutable evidence the dimensions as noted in the article should agree with that posted on the wall, which is 395 (and not 400) feet.

I attended several games at Dodger Stadium from the period 1967 through 1976, sitting in both Left and Right Field Pavilion many times. In addition to home plate moved toward center field, I know for a fact that the fence was moved away from the Pavilion stairs that allow fans to reach their seats (which are located between the Pavilion structure and the fence) approx. 3 feet in the late 1960s, most likely 1969. Prior to this there was very little distance between these stairs and the fence, which is not the case now. Overhead photos of the Stadium bear this out. I also am convinced that the physical dimensions were changed at least twice. As evidence center field dimensions had been labeled 410 feet, then 400 feet, finally arriving at the current 395 feet sometime later. Although I have not seen any documentation that the fence was moved in, it can explain some of the reduction on center field distance from 410 feet to 395 feet. There was also a legal concern with dimensions at the time, as MLB had imposed a rule in the early 1970s (due to Charlie Finley's changing of dimensions at old Kansas City Municipal Stadium) which required all Major League stadiums configure to minimum distance of 325 feet along both foul lines, and 400 feet to straightaway center field. There was confusion over this with Dodger Stadium, as the posted 395 signs were not directly at center field. However, with simple observation one could see that center field fence conformed to a near radius from home plate, so that the actual distance exactly to center field was very close to that at the signs approx. 15 feet to the left and right. If one looks now (2012), 395 is clearly posted very close to straightaway center field. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.181.197.1 (talk) 23:26, 13 April 2012 (UTC)

These photos from 1962[2] and 1963[3] indicate pretty well that there was a gap between the fence and the seating area of the bleachers. Specific details are not so clear. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 23:41, 13 April 2012 (UTC)
A gap has always existed between the Pavilion structure and the outfield fence, to accommodate the ingress/egress stairs. The landing of these stairways were essentially adjacent to the fence until approx. 1969, as can be seen from the second photo. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.167.94.36 (talk) 04:54, 15 April 2012 (UTC)
Can you find a photo 1969 or later which shows the increased gap? ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 05:01, 15 April 2012 (UTC)
Here is the best I can find, although anyone who attends a game should be able to document this. Link: http://www.somelifeblog.com/2008/05/lazy-night-at-dodgers-stadium.html (third photo shows about a 3 foot gap between the stairway handrail/landing and fence) I also know the fence was moved away from the stairway landing, as this was commonly used by fans (such as myself) to catch batting practice flies, and it was possible at that time to stand on the landing (assuming the usher was not looking) and reach over the fence. As one can see from this photo, this is no longer possible. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.167.94.36 (talk) 05:11, 15 April 2012 (UTC)
The fence might be a little farther away from those landings, and it's almost certainly also shorter than it once was. Here's something to consider: Prior to 1969, the distance from the plate to the backstop is given as 68 feet. In 1969 it's given as 75 feet. That's a 7 foot increase. Yet the outfield markers indicate a 10 feet decrease. This is too much like OR to put in the article... but maybe the other 3 feet came from also moving the fences inward? The fence was lowered much more recently, though. But that's a separate issue. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 05:27, 15 April 2012 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:DodgerStadiumLogo150.PNG[edit]

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BetacommandBot (talk) 05:12, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

What hype?[edit]

Baseball Bugs: where was the hype? I was only trying to make the article flow a bit more nicely.GeorgeC (talk) 03:15, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

One thing that caught my attention was the restoring of the expression "terrific run of luck", which is puffery, and also the restoring of the untrue statement about Arlington Stadium, which led me to conclude that you simply blindly restored some earlier version of the article. Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? 05:27, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

Nope. Didn't even check what the previous version said. I do agree with your comments about "terrific run of luck". However, I thought my version looked better. I guess not... GeorgeC (talk) 08:25, 5 April 2008 (UTC)

You also reinstated the Arlington Stadium claim. Arlington Stadium was circular and could accommodate football. It was not single-purpose. Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? 04:15, 6 April 2008 (UTC)

Actually, Dodger Stadium could accomodate a football field and it has occasionally been considered as an alternative to the Memorial Coliseum as a home for the USC Trojans football team. I do not know of any football games which have ever been played there. Many of the older pre-1962 baseball parks have been used for football in the fall. Timothy Horrigan (talk) 21:39, 20 November 2008 (UTC)

George Carlin Incident[edit]

I think in this article we should mention the late comedian George Carlin's non fatal heart attack that he suffered in 1982, while watching a game against the Met's. Just thought I'd mention this. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.171.37.139 (talk) 01:18, 4 October 2009 (UTC)

Chavez Ravine?[edit]

The article states that Dodger Stadium is commonly known as "Chavez Ravine"...I'm a Los Angeles native and have been going to Dodger games since I was very young, and I've never heard that term used before... --69.3.130.249 (talk) 19:04, 11 August 2011 (UTC)

Someone slipped that bit of original research in there about 4 months ago. It was called "Chavez Ravine" or "Chavez Ravine Stadium" by the Angels when they were there, so that name is basically obsolete, though it may still be called that by some. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 20:51, 11 August 2011 (UTC)
There is an article on Chavez Ravine; the name predates the stadium. 2001:5C0:1000:A:0:0:0:E5 (talk) 22:14, 14 August 2012 (UTC)
First there was the ravine call Chavez Ravine, then there was Dodger Stadium, and then Chavez Ravine Stadium, aka Chavez Ravine. I would be surprised if it's called "Chavez Ravine [Stadium]" very often now. It's kind of like when the Giants played at Giants Stadium and the Jets played at The Meadowlands, which was the same stadium. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 22:54, 14 August 2012 (UTC)

I'm curious as to why the following is included in this article: "Los Angeles-based Mike Davis, in his seminal work on the city, City of Quartz, describes the process of gradually convincing Chavez Ravine homeowners to sell. With nearly all of the original Spanish-speaking homeowners initially unwilling to sell, developers resorted to offering immediate cash payments, distributed through their Spanish-speaking agents. Once the first sales had been completed, remaining homeowners were offered increasingly lesser amounts of money, to create a community panic of not receiving fair compensation, or of being left as one of the few holdouts. Many residents continued to hold out despite the pressure being placed upon them by developers, resulting in the Battle of Chavez Ravine, an unsuccessful ten-year struggle by the residents to maintain control of their property. The controversy surrounding the construction of Dodger Stadium provided the inspiration for singer Ry Cooder's 2005 concept album, Chávez Ravine." ... Is this just blatant promotion of "City of Quartz" and "Chavez Ravine" (Album)? Because the issue of the developers offering decreasing amounts of money pre-dates the City of Los Angeles' decision to offer the property to the Dodger organization and is thus not really related to the stadium itself. Perhaps a better place for it would be under an article related to Chavez Ravine itself. The Dodgers had actually nothing to do with clearing the property, save a tiny fraction of the overall total. That was a result of the city's decision to redevelop it in the first place. This is a common misunderstanding and Wikipedia should clear misconceptions up with facts, not add to them. <--- Thurifer

violent incidents at DS[edit]

Shouldn't they be included? 184.144.129.76 (talk) 15:55, 21 August 2011 (UTC)

Be specific, and cite your sources. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 03:12, 22 August 2011 (UTC)

1st Game?[edit]

Shouldn't there be a line in there somewhere about who and when the first game was played? (If I somehow missed it I apologize).209.179.27.118 (talk) 03:59, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

Fence heights?[edit]

If anyone knows how high the fences are in the outfield, I'd appreciate it if the rest of us could know about it.

Yugiohfan2010 (talk) 03:35, 27 January 2015 (UTC)

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