Talk:Dog

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Former good article Dog was one of the good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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Body temperature[edit]

Could someone more experienced add in a section about the dog's body temperature, like the physiology section of the cat article. Karel Adriaan (talk) 18:00, 8 May 2016 (UTC)

False information in this article?[edit]

In the taxonomy section, it says "The dog was classified as Canis familiaris,[23] which means "Dog-family"[24] or the family dog."

In context, this means that Linneaus meant "family dog" when he classified it as Canis familiaris.

There is reason to believe that this is false.

Points of fact:

1. Linneaus also classified the common treecreeper as familiaris.

2. Citation says that the Latin adjective "familaris" means not just "family" but also "familiar" (i.e.: "common" or "ordinary").

Reasoning:

Lineaus obviously meant "familiar, common treecreeper" when he named the common treecreeper familiaris?, not "family tree-creeper", so he ?meant "familiar dog", not "family dog".

This article should be edited in light of this.

I pause for comment before proceeding. Chrisrus (talk) 12:43, 21 May 2016 (UTC)

Let us be clear about what the Oxford English Dictionary actually states - "Origin: Middle English (in the sense 'intimate', 'on a family footing'): from Old French familier, from Latin familiaris, from familia 'household servants, family', from famulus 'servant'." It looks fairly clear to me, Chris, a member of the family - nothing ordinary or common about the dog. I don't care much for treecreepers. Regards, William Harristalk • 11:52, 23 May 2016 (UTC)
Which OED entry says that? Chrisrus (talk) 00:48, 24 May 2016 (UTC)
The citation that is supplied, if one were to follow it through to the bottom of the page and the derivation of the word from the Latin. Additionally, if Linneaus wanted something to be called "common", he would have named it communis eg Panorpa communis. If he wanted something to be "ordinary", he would have named it ordinarius eg Conus ammiralis var. ordinarius. (If we are going to do some research Chris, then we need to research all of the possibilities.) But we are not here to debate what was going on in someone's head 250 years ago, we are looking at the meaning of the Latin word familiaris - I see the word family jump out straight away, as did the Latins. Regards, William Harristalk • 10:59, 24 May 2016 (UTC)
I looked at several definitions yesterday and some of them also list familiaris as meaning "familiar" or "common" [1][2][3]. I too always thought it meant "common", but this might be a case of "it depends which book you read". DrChrissy (talk) 11:25, 24 May 2016 (UTC)
Thanks Chrissy (who looked at other possibilities). Given that the Oxford Dictionary - maintained by Oxford University through its Oxford University Press - is the overseer of the English language, I suggest we stay with its derivation for the Latin word familiaris. William Harristalk • 09:09, 25 May 2016 (UTC)
Use Latin dictionaries for this, not English dictionaries. We want to know what it meant in Latin.
Chrissy is right; Latin dictionaries confirm that "familiaris" meant both "family" and "familiar".
Ask how to say "familiar" is said in Latin, and learn the answer is "familiaris". For example https://en.glosbe.com/en/la/familiar
Here is the conversation that led to this one: Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Tree_of_Life#Question:_What_does_.22familiaris.22_mean.3F Chrisrus (talk) 23:09, 25 May 2016 (UTC)
If you both believe that is the correct course of action, then feel free to amend the sentence to read "familiaris" means both "family" and "familiar". Right now regarding Canis familiaris, my undivided attention is on the approach of 1pm, Thursday 2 June 2016, US Eastern Standard Time. Regards, William Harristalk • 09:33, 26 May 2016 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 5 June 2016[edit]

~jewish people dont HAVE to feed them before they eat its just preferable

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please provide reliable sources that support the change you want to be made. Not sure how reliable the currently cited source is, but https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/animals.html says "In the Talmud, the rabbis further dictated that a person may not purchase an animal unless he has made provisions to feed it, and a person must feed his animals before he feeds himself. " Cannolis (talk) 17:22, 5 June 2016 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 10 June 2016[edit]

In the Taxonomy section there is the following sentence: In 1978, a review aimed at reducing the number of recognized Canis species proposed that "Canis dingo is now generally regarded as a distinctive feral domestic dog.

More recent research continues to support Canis dingo as a separate species (e.g. Crowther et al 2014 An updated description of the Australian dingo (Canis dingo Meyer, 1793) Journal of Zoology 293(3): 192-203. Furthermore, research by Smith and Litchfield 2009 (A review of the relationship between indigenous Australians, dingoes (Canis dingo) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), Anthrozoös 22(2):111-129) suggests the dingo was never fully domesticated by indigenous Australians and therefore not considered a feral domestic dog.

I would like to propose that the above sentence be removed as it is ambiguous and inaccurate. Lvaneeden (talk) 07:30, 10 June 2016 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: That was the history that led to the Dingo and the Dog being classified as Canis lupus. It is not inaccurate because it is a direct quote from the cited reference. It is not ambiguous because based on your proposal above you knew exactly what it means. It is taxonomic history and therefore should not be removed. Wikipedia goes by the taxonomic classification contained within Mammal Species of the World edition 3 - rightly or wrongly - and not by the opinions of dissenting academics. Fan 2016 has recently conducted, for the first time, a whole-genome sequencing of wolves, dogs and dingoes and their finding was that they are all gray wolves and made the point of rebutting Crowther on genomic grounds.[1] See further Evolution of the wolf#Domestic dog. Regards, William Harristalk • 10:30, 12 June 2016 (UTC)
    • ^ Fan, Zhenxin; Silva, Pedro; Gronau, Ilan; Wang, Shuoguo; Armero, Aitor Serres; Schweizer, Rena M.; Ramirez, Oscar; Pollinger, John; Galaverni, Marco; Ortega Del-Vecchyo, Diego; Du, Lianming; Zhang, Wenping; Zhang, Zhihe; Xing, Jinchuan; Vilà, Carles; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Godinho, Raquel; Yue, Bisong; Wayne, Robert K. (2016). "Worldwide patterns of genomic variation and admixture in gray wolves". Genome Research. 26 (2): 163–73. doi:10.1101/gr.197517.115. PMID 26680994.