Talk:Doping in sport

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Medicine (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Sports (Rated C-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Sports, a WikiProject which aims to improve coverage of sport-related topics on Wikipedia. For more information, visit the project page, where you can join the project and/or contribute to the discussion.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Philosophy (Rated C-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Philosophy, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of content related to philosophy on Wikipedia. If you would like to support the project, please visit the project page, where you can get more details on how you can help, and where you can join the general discussion about philosophy content on Wikipedia.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Drug Policy (Rated C-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Drug Policy, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Drug Policy on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Olympics (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon Doping in sport is within the scope of WikiProject Olympics. For more information, visit the project page, where you can join the project and/or contribute to the discussion.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Unsourced, dubious changes from 2008[edit]

I was reading the article when I came across this strange quote, allegedly from 1964 (emphasis added):

I cannot remember how they first came to be offered to us. But they were distributed in the dressing rooms. We didn't have to take them but most of the players did. The tablets were mostly white but once or twice they were yellow. They were used through the 1961–62 season and the championship season which followed it. Drug-taking had previously been virtually unnamed in the club. But once it had started we could have as many tablets as we liked. On match days they were handed out to most players as a matter of course. Soon some of the players could not do without the drugs. Now in Professional sports only 34% of the Athletes use Performance enhancing drugs. (Gabbert, Michael: How we uncovered the Everton drug scandal, The People, UK, 13 September 1964)

I found it strange that someone had used language like the highlighted sentence already in 1964. I have no access to the original article, but I used WP:WikiBlame to discover who added this. Turns out, the original quote – added in Dec 2007 – was amended by 198.174.207.1 (talk · contribs · WHOIS) in April 2008. The IP user's other contributions seem strange, including this one where he changed the first question from the 1972 Olympics survey. It turns out, this latter change seems to contradict this source, which I take to mean the user was only experimenting with editing. I have thus reverted these almost four-year-old changes to the article. --hydrox (talk) 23:53, 6 February 2012 (UTC)

Influence of popular culture[edit]

In addition to pressures from coaches and athletic programs, individuals are often times influenced by the media and popular culture. I think it would be wise to note the effect of the media on amateur athletes. Many individuals may believe these drugs are permissible based on the fact that professional athletes use them. MozHoag28 (talk) 22:39, 8 February 2012 (UTC)

Edits[edit]

Just letting everyone know that I will be adding a section to this article under the NFL section. This section will include some statistics on NFL steroid use, recent cases, and the NFL performance-enhancing drug policy. — Preceding unsigned comment added by MozHoag28 (talkcontribs) 13:48, 18 April 2012 (UTC)

Anabolic Steroids have major scientific side effects on the body; the negative effects that steroids have on the body should be the main the reason why baseball bans players from using them. Here are all the health issues that a player will have to deal with sometime or another during and after the use of steroids. There are strong indications that tumors of the liver are caused when the anabolic steroids contain a 17-alpha-alkyl group. Also anabolic steroids may lead to hepatic carcinoma. A well known side effect of AS in males is breast formation (gynecomastia). Gynecomastia is caused by increased levels of circulating estrogens, which are typical female sex hormones. Most of the investigations have been focused on risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and in particular the effect of anabolic steroids on blood pressure and on plasma lipoproteins. Anabolic steroid users may become dependent on the drug, with symptoms of withdrawal after cessation of drug use. The withdrawal symptoms consist of aggressive and violent behavior, mental depression with suicidal behavior, mood changes, and in some cases acute psychosis. Steroids also have some side effects that aren't as bad. They are premature balding or hair loss, dizziness, mood swings, including anger, aggression, and depression, believing things that aren't true (delusion), extreme feelings of mistrust or fear (paranoia), problems sleeping, nausea and vomiting, trembling, high blood pressure that can damage the heart or blood vessels over time, aching joints, greater chance of injuring muscles and tendons, jaundice or yellowing of the skin; liver damage, urinary problems, shortening of final adult height, and increased risk of developing heart disease, stroke, and some types of cancer. Steroids pose an unfair advantage for players that use them. They help athletes get stronger, run fasterWell, when I think of steroids I think of an image. You have the advantage over someone, which is a form of cheating. I guess it wouldn't be right unless it was legal for everybody. Reason it's not legal for everybody is because it can hurt people seriously (Brainy Quote)." With steroids, players have broken records that people thought would never be broken. Steroids have been around in sports for a long time. It wasn't until 2004 that steroids have become such a big problem. Steroids are killing the integrity of the game. A lot of the big time players in Major League Baseball that own records have been able to achieve those records because of the use of steroids, and that's not right. There have been a lot of athletes that kids look up to that have accomplished their goals by not using steroids. Those are the athletes that we should be hearing about in the news, not the ones that cheat. Steroids give an unfair advantage to the people who use them. It makes them run faster, jump higher, and pitch faster. The most important thing about using steroids is the fact that it destroys your body. Not only are steroids dangerous but the injection of steroids is just as dangerous. As the saying goes "cheaters never win," and with the new restrictions they won't. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Runninlope10 (talkcontribs) 21:50, 26 July 2012 (UTC)

Technology Doping[edit]

I have a dispute with respect to potential technology doping in Controversies at the 2012 Summer Olympics: Technologies used for Olympic sports I'm not sure if anyone can help, or if this is the correct place to ask. The section starts:

You may wish to include a section on Technology doping on this board as well.--Andromedean (talk) 17:53, 24 August 2012 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: Moved to Doping in sport Mike Cline (talk) 17:50, 4 September 2012 (UTC)



Use of performance-enhancing drugs in sportDoping in sports – It is the common term according to the article. Also, the current name is a bit unwieldy and the new title is a wider brief. Target is currently a redir. New name will match Category:Doping Category:Doping in sport and the other [Doping in ...] articles. -- Alan Liefting (talk - contribs) 23:58, 26 August 2012 (UTC)

  • Support, doping: "The use of drugs to improve athletic performance." This will also led to a much more concise title. --The Evil IP address (talk) 22:04, 29 August 2012 (UTC)

Support - As per WP:COMMONNAME --JetBlast (talk) 22:30, 29 August 2012 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

It's 'sportS", not "sport". More than one sport has evidence of doping in it, there are multiple sports. If you'd like to continue to be pedantic, you may select "sporting". Otherwise, it shall be "sportS". As in: "This man is quite good at sports." which is similar to "This man is quite good at athletics." One does not say "This man is quite good at athlete." Otherwise it's a nice page, just clean-up the pedantic, upper-class British English violations! Thanks. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2610:130:103:E00:307E:C788:FDCA:4210 (talk) 17:44, 25 July 2013 (UTC)

Would you like vinegar on those chips? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.240.231.4 (talk) 09:30, 9 August 2013 (UTC)

Categories are a mess[edit]

Several of the categories are dead links.--Froglich (talk) 07:28, 9 August 2013 (UTC)

Vandalism[edit]

I have reverted to an earlier edition of this article after some pro-doping vandalism on the page. 116.247.88.119 (talk) 07:38, 9 October 2014 (UTC)

Peer Review Wikiproject:Medicine[edit]

Hi User:VivamusAmemus,

Great edits overall. One section that I am interested in seeing improved is testing methods. I think improving this section would drastically increase the readership of this article.

Cheers, Salubrious Toxin (talk) 00:20, 25 February 2015 (UTC)