Talk:E Ink

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Nook color?[edit]

Why is the nook color mentioned in this article? It has an LCD display, not eInk. I would just remove it, but if someone can justify it somehow, please go ahead and do that now.

--67.160.175.236 (talk) 16:56, 7 December 2010 (UTC)

Bad Marketing[edit]

There is no reason why iLiad must occupy all of the pictures of the eInk article. Something more popular in market must be represented. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.238.84.64 (talk) 08:10, 22 July 2010 (UTC)

Poorly constructed sentences[edit]

The following two sentences from the article are woefully lacking:

In addition, the Samsung Alias 2 utilizes this technology as the display on the buttons change. The October 2008 issue of the North American edition of Esquire was the first magazine cover to integrate E Ink.

Their author knew what exactly they were trying to convey, however they're completely meaningless to a lay person. When introducing new technology, some background information has to be provided first to set the stage for the technical innovations being discussed; e.g.: does 'buttons change' refer to a built-in display on the 'change-buttons', and what did the integration of E ink into or onto a paper magazine cover accomplish? Readers shouldn't have to start Googling word phrases to understand this type of basic information. Please revise as required -I don't even know were to start. HarryZilber (talk) 12:47, 23 August 2009 (UTC)

Should it be Combined wit Electronic Paper?[edit]

I believe that this article should be combined with the much related article Electronic paper. Perhaps registered and experienced Wikipedia users can help decide in this. Thank you 193.188.105.20 (talk) 16:25, 1 February 2010 (UTC)

No, it should not be combined. "E Ink" is a specific trademarked product produced by the E Ink Corporation. Electronic Paper refers more or less to the technology.

What does it do?[edit]

This article did not tell me what the e ink did or how it was different from my computers letter ink. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.237.86.230 (talk) 19:55, 25 May 2010 (UTC)

Yes it does. The very first sentence tells you that it is a specific proprietary type of electronic paper. Go read about electronic paper if you want to know what it is.

Updating of product lineup[edit]

E ink now also makes a segmented EPD, coined "Surf". I feel this should be included right under Triton. Also Pearl does not have a specific statement regarding its monochrome nature, if possible update this too with a backup statement/spec from E ink. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 66.135.236.42 (talk) 20:20, 23 February 2011 (UTC)

The first picture is very wrong O.o[edit]

Can someone explain to me how they manage to reflect "black light" from the black E-ink particles? The light becoming "Whiter" when it hits the white ones is also a bit weird, as I doubt that a red beam would suddenly gain the rest of the spectrum :P

--Synethos (talk) 18:05, 23 July 2011 (UTC)

My impression was that the white particles reflect white light (or whatever the incident light is), while the black particles simply don't reflect anything at all (they absorb it). So in terms of the physics, it's the same as with normal paper. Jimw338 (talk) 17:49, 23 June 2017 (UTC)

E Ink vs. e-ink problem[edit]

I think there are a lot of misunderstand about e-ink, because some people looking for e-ink and found just E ink here. E ink is part of the bigger group what contain all of e-ink technologies. Infect the Gyricon is e-ink too. Maybe in this article should be make clear this different.

Here is a useful link: http://thefutureofthings.com/3081-the-future-of-electronic-paper

"... E-paper comprises two different parts: the first is electronic ink, sometimes referred to as the "frontplane"; and the second is the electronics required to generate the pattern of text and images on the e-ink page, called the "backplane".

Over the years, a number of methods for creating e-ink have been developed. The Gyricon e-ink developed in the 70s by Nick Sheridon at Xerox is based on a thin sheet of flexible plastic containing a layer of tiny plastic beads, each encapsulated in a little pocket of oil and thus able to freely rotate within the plastic sheet. Each hemisphere of a bead has a different color and a different electrical charge. When an electric field is applied by the backplane, the beads rotate, creating a two-colored pattern. This method of creating e-ink was dubbed bichromal frontplane. Originally, bichromal frontplane had a number of limitations, including relatively low brightness and resolution and a lack of color. Although these issues are still being tackled, other forms of e-ink, with improved properties compared to the original Gyricon, have been developed over the years.

One such technology is electrophoretic frontplane, developed by the E Ink Corporation. Electrophoretic frontplane consists of millions of tiny microcapsules..." --Szente (talk) 00:38, 26 October 2011 (UTC)

Copyright problem removed[edit]

Prior content in this article duplicated one or more previously published sources. The material was copied from: http://www.eink.com/technology.html and http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/electronic-paper-display--epd-.html. Infringing material has been rewritten or removed and must not be restored, unless it is duly released under a compatible license. (For more information, please see "using copyrighted works from others" if you are not the copyright holder of this material, or "donating copyrighted materials" if you are.) For legal reasons, we cannot accept copyrighted text or images borrowed from other web sites or published material; such additions will be deleted. Contributors may use copyrighted publications as a source of information, but not as a source of sentences or phrases. Accordingly, the material may be rewritten, but only if it does not infringe on the copyright of the original or plagiarize from that source. Please see our guideline on non-free text for how to properly implement limited quotations of copyrighted text. Wikipedia takes copyright violations very seriously, and persistent violators will be blocked from editing. While we appreciate contributions, we must require all contributors to understand and comply with these policies. Thank you. Moonriddengirl (talk) 11:21, 3 April 2012 (UTC)

On 5 June 2011, the page history was blocked from November 21, 2007 through June 5, 2011. Refer to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Copyright_problems/2011_May_26 Sparkie82 (tc) 15:08, 3 April 2012 (UTC)

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Regal technology[edit]

Is the Regal / Regal 2 technology missing after the subsection 'E Ink Carta' ? I think it's being used in current generation (2016) readers, along with i.MX 7. 46.132.191.249 (talk) 13:08, 6 June 2016 (UTC)

All E Ink Carta displays support Regal waveforms, which reduces the need for page refreshes. This has been added to that section since it is a technology used in Carta, not a separate generation. Also, i.MX 7 is a Freescale chipset used in e-readers, which has little to do with E Ink. --Frmorrison (talk) 15:46, 7 June 2016 (UTC)

E Ink Keyboard[edit]

This is suppose to ship Q1 of 2017. https://sonderdesign.comSbmeirowTalk • 18:29, 31 October 2016 (UTC)

E-Ink Triton - physical description?[edit]

Has it been revealed how the Triton color display works? I would imagine it would have three layers (RGB) of translucent beads (reflective or not of it's specific color, clear to everything else), each sandwiched between it's own set of electrodes, and then have some sort of (bordering on hand-waving Star-Trek-Babble here I know) "stabilizing field generation" that would keep the one layer's electrodes from interfering with the other layers when it is changed. But is there anything known (in the patents?) Jimw338 (talk) 17:56, 23 June 2017 (UTC)

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