Talk:Economy of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

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Contradiction[edit]

The economy was organised as a mixed planned socialist and market socialist economy: factories were nationalized, but they were not owned by the state — they were rather socially owned, which roughly corresponds to public ownership in other economic systems.

This sentence contradicts itself. The public ownership article states that it is synonymous with state owned. I will remove this pending clarification. - FrancisTyers 22:48, 28 January 2006 (UTC)

Perhaps its a play on definitions, shall we say it was nationalized in the since that factories where not privately owned, but neither by the state, rather by workers councils? Profit was distributed among workers, something alike when profits are distributed amongst stock holders. Here is what seems alike other economic systems. Shall we rewrite as "The economy was organised as a mixed planned socialist and market socialist economy: factories were nationalized, but they were not owned by the state, neither privately — they were rather socially owned, which roughly corresponds to stock ownership in other economic systems. Profits where primarly distributed among workers." Foant 22:16, 29 January 2006 (UTC)
Indeed it's a play on definitions. The reality was almost all the profits and decision powers went to the factory managers - directors. Any other wording that does not reflect that is just facade.--Cigor 05:50, 1 February 2006 (UTC)
Sounds good to me. As an aside, this article could do with more sourcing. - FrancisTyers 23:06, 29 January 2006 (UTC)
Agreed, Ill add sources when I start reading about the subject in college, which might take some time. Foant 00:26, 30 January 2006 (UTC)

This somehow fell of my watchlist, so sorry for neglecting to answer these questions earlier. There was indeed a difference between socially and state owned property. State owned property was managed by the state, and socially owned property was managed by self-management organs like worker's councils. For instance, the workers of a factory could decide to sell some of the factory's socially-owned real property, while such things were decided by the government for state-owned property.

There is also a real difference in how the privatization of both categories is handled in post-Yugoslavia states. Also, at least in the Balkans, publicly owned and state owned doesn't mean the same thing even now in capitalism - again, publicly owned property is not directly managed by the government. Zocky | picture popups 09:31, 1 November 2006 (UTC)

Controversial sentence[edit]

Slovenia, Croatia, and finally, Bosnia fought bloody civil wars against "rump" Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) or Serbian nationalists or both.

This sentence (I'm not going to go into details if it's correct or not) is very "heated". It could hardly be said that those countries were fighting FRY (especially not Slovenia); and it might seem dubious, as Croatia & Bosnia fought against their own inhabitants of Serb/Croat ethnicity, rather. And the "fighting against Serbian nationalists"-implying bit doesn't sound very attracting either. The sentence puts it as if Serbia and Montenegro were to Yugoslavia what was Germany to Europe in World War II (hardly comparable). The two "or'"s are also fishy. Last but not least, "Civil wars" are wars within and not against another state. lol :) --PaxEquilibrium 23:58, 28 January 2007 (UTC)

Image copyright problem with Image:Zavodi Crvena Zastava.jpg[edit]

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GDP per cities[edit]

Hi I have information on the GDP per capita level of several main cities for 1981. Would anyone be against me including this information under GDP per republics. I think it gives a pretty good sense of which areas were developed or not. These figures are in relation to the Yugoslav average.

1. Ljubljana 260% 2. Zagreb 188% 3. Novi Sad 172% 4. Belgrade 141% 5. Split 137% 6. Sarajevo 133% 7. Nis 110% 8. Banja Luka 97% 9. Skopje 90% 10. Podgorica 87% 11. Pristina 70%

Also for 1981 here's republics and provinces by their GDP per capita (Yugoslavia 100%)

1. Slovenia 180% 2. Vojvodina 129% 3. Croatia 128% 4. Serbia 96% 5. Montenegro 78% 6. Bosnia 69% 7. Macedonia 65% 8. Kosovo 33% —Preceding unsigned comment added by Yugo91aesop (talkcontribs) 06:10, 23 November 2009 (UTC)

I added GDP per capita for cities. I think it gives an excellent idea of which were the poorer and richer parts of the country and also of the economic development of Yugoslavia before the wars. It can be seen here that cities such as Sarajevo and Belgrade both affected terrible during the 90's, one by war the other by bombings, were actually fairly developed. Hope this info is of use to people. Yugo91aesop (talk) 02:36, 1 December 2009 (UTC)