Talk:Effects of global warming on humans

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Contents

Add I PAT (human Population * Affluence * Technology = environmental Impact)?[edit]

Add I PAT ? ... (Human impact of climate change not the same) Human Impact = human Population * Affluence * Technology ... Planetary boundaries; Appropriate Technology or Holocene extinction also ? 99.181.151.5 (talk) 22:39, 25 January 2011 (UTC)

That's human impact ''on'' climate change, not human impact ''of'' climate change. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 02:18, 26 January 2011 (UTC)
Or Impact of climate change on humans? That seems to be many loosely connected wp articles already. 99.119.128.35 (talk) 23:36, 30 March 2011 (UTC)
That's the stated purpose of this article. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 09:31, 31 March 2011 (UTC)

Merge with The Effect of Climate Change on Human Health – Malaria[edit]

The Effect of Climate Change on Human Health – Malaria is a short orphan just as Effects of climate change on humans is a short orphan. Because the latter is the broader topic, I recommend that the former be merged here. Neelix (talk) 20:42, 8 April 2011 (UTC)

Sounds good. 99.119.131.205 (talk) 02:31, 23 April 2011 (UTC)
Appears to redirect here now currently. 99.181.151.111 (talk) 05:11, 23 April 2011 (UTC)

"Public goods" = public Good (economics), wikilink.[edit]

"Public goods" = public Good (economics), wikilink. 97.87.29.188 (talk) 19:20, 28 April 2011 (UTC)

Wrong. It's public goods, if anything. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 19:27, 28 April 2011 (UTC)

Ozone Depletion[edit]

I note that in the introduction the article mentions 'ozone depletion' as a product of climate change. This is not the case - this problem was unrelated. Should it be removed? JTansut (talk) 20:19, 20 May 2011 (UTC)

Would that be instead a Human impact on the environment, as related to Planetary boundaries? 216.250.156.66 (talk) 19:55, 28 July 2011 (UTC)

Regional effects of global warming = "every region of the world"[edit]

Regional effects of global warming = "every region of the world" 99.119.131.248 (talk) 01:13, 28 May 2011 (UTC)

??? If it's every region, then it's not "regional effects". — Arthur Rubin (talk) 06:30, 29 May 2011 (UTC)

Abundent Original Research[edit]

This article is full of original research and opinion. I have removed quite a bit, but don't have time to go through every singe source to make sure that they have been summarized accurately. Arzel (talk) 00:07, 15 June 2011 (UTC)

Also, climate change in its generalest term means hot to cold and cold to hot. It seems the article focuses mainly on the current cycle. Anyways, --Threeafterthree (talk) 01:25, 15 June 2011 (UTC)
what is a "generalest "? 216.250.156.66 (talk) 00:57, 22 June 2011 (UTC)
I meant most common form or generalist(sp)...--Threeafterthree (talk) 01:45, 22 June 2011 (UTC)

Add current slow global warming (with explanation as to why slower currently), but mid-term acceleration in warming resources?[edit]

Saw this in Talk:Global_warming/Archive_64#Resource_via_Science_News

with "suggested reading" ...

    • N. Drake. Sulfur stalls surface temperature rise. Science News. Vol. 180, July 30, 2011, p. 17.
    • S. Perkins. Hazy changes on high. Science News Online. August 14, 2009.

216.250.156.66 (talk) 19:12, 29 August 2011 (UTC)

Or what this be more appropriate in Effects of climate change/Effects of global warming? 216.250.156.66 (talk) 19:17, 29 August 2011 (UTC)

Did you intend would this be Special:Contributions/216.250.156.66? 99.181.134.37 (talk) 10:44, 17 December 2011 (UTC)

Recommend clarification of wording instead of lede deletion ...[edit]

The effects of climate change on humans have been understood to be responsible today, or predicted to be responsible in the future, for significant economic losses, as well as loss of life and wellbeing or health. In unstable or fragile regions or communities, the additional burden of climatic changes triggered by global warming may have further negative impacts in social, political or security terms.

99.190.85.146 (talk) 06:31, 4 October 2011 (UTC)

Please propose a coherent sentence, first. I agree with Xbudox: it is better to have a marginal violation of WP:LEDE than to have incoherent remarks in the lede. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 11:24, 14 October 2011 (UTC)

El Niño-Southern Oscillation and Civil disorder resource[edit]

El Niños may inflame civil unrest; Climate pattern correlates with increased risk of conflict By Janet Raloff October 8th, 2011; Vol.180 #8 (p. 16) Science News, regarding Solomon Hsiang of Princeton University and his coauthors at Columbia University report in the Aug. 25 Nature (journal), with comments by statistician Andrew Solow of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts and Neil Johnson of the University of Miami and Yaneer Bar-Yam of the New England Complex Systems Institute in Cambridge, Mass; excerpt ...

About every seven years, climates in tropical regions swing between conditions dominated by an El Niño and those moderated by a La Niña (cooling in equatorial Pacific waters). During El Niño years, the likelihood that a new civil conflict would erupt in equatorial nations was roughly 6 percent, or twice that for La Niña periods.

99.109.127.58 (talk) 23:16, 7 October 2011 (UTC)

La Niña 99.190.87.183 (talk) 05:01, 9 October 2011 (UTC)
Equitorial 99.119.131.17 (talk) 03:15, 17 October 2011 (UTC)
See El Niño-Southern Oscillation. 99.181.132.192 (talk) 19:24, 8 November 2011 (UTC)
Here is a related book ... Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence by Christian Parenti ISBN-13: 978-1568586007 Publisher: Nation Books (June 28, 2011) "Parenti argues that this incipient "climate fascism"--a political hardening of wealthy states-- is bound to fail. The struggling states of the developing world cannot be allowed to collapse, as they will take other nations down as well. Instead, we must work to meet the challenge of climate-driven violence with a very different set of sustainable economic and development policies."[1] 99.190.87.173 (talk) 20:26, 8 December 2011 (UTC)

Add wikilink to developing nations[edit]

Add wikilink to developing nations. 99.109.126.95 (talk) 22:51, 28 October 2011 (UTC)

Done. DaffyBridge (talk) 22:58, 28 October 2011 (UTC)
Why? How do we know that our concept of developing nations is the same as the one in the article? — Arthur Rubin (talk) 07:20, 29 October 2011 (UTC)
Why not? 141.218.36.152 (talk) 21:44, 29 October 2011 (UTC)
Seems to me that the WP article on developing countries should be presumed good. It is rated B-class and high importance; see Talk. A reader of this article can compare the usage in the reference and in that other WP article. This note is posted in response to a removal today that I observed of a link from developing countries. The edit summary justification was "per talk," which according the record above seems not to be a strong justification. A majority thinks this link is reasonable. Coastwise (talk) 08:23, 27 November 2011 (UTC)

Wikilink Small Island Developing States[edit]

Wikilink Small Island Developing States. 99.35.14.165 (talk) 04:20, 9 November 2011 (UTC)

I just made a fix which I hope is satisfactory to those involved in this back and forth. The following form for the link goes to the other page, whose name must be capitalized, but shows the text in lower case within this article: small island developing states. Problem solved? Coastwise (talk) 06:16, 9 November 2011 (UTC)
Seems OK, except that the capitalization of the name of the article is also questionable. But that's a matter for that article, not this one. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 08:10, 9 November 2011 (UTC)

SciAm resource[edit]

From Talk:Vector (epidemiology), regarding the effects of global warming ...

Climate Change May Make Insect-Born Diseases Harder to Control "Warmer temperatures will combine with numerous other factors to make diseases like malaria and West Nile virus harder to control" by Umair Irfan and ClimateWire (www.eenews.net) November 21, 2011 Scientific American.

Also see from article; Regional effects of global warming, dengue fever, World Health Organization, mosquitoes, ecology, evolutionary biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, Science (journal), birds, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Academic Medical Center, Oxford University, Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Princeton University,

99.190.86.93 (talk) 06:29, 2 December 2011 (UTC)

potential resources[edit]

  • The Crash Course: The Unsustainable Future Of Our Economy, Energy, And Environment by Christopher Martenson Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (March 29, 2011) ISBN-13: 978-0470927649
  • The Great Disruption: Why the Climate Crisis Will Bring On the End of Shopping and the Birth of a New World by Paul Gilding publisher Bloomsbury Press (March 29, 2011) ISBN-13: 978-1608192236
  • Changing Planet, Changing Health: How the Climate Crisis Threatens Our Health and What We Can Do about It by authors Paul R. Epstein MD and Dan Ferber with forward by Jeffrey Sachs publisher University of California Press; 1 edition (April 4, 2011) ISBN-13: 978-0520269095

99.190.87.173 (talk) 21:17, 8 December 2011 (UTC)

Why was this removed?[edit]

The University of Southampton in the UK ranked the top ten nations endangered to to flooding from global warming and climate change. First is the Marshall islands, second is Bahrain, third is the Maldives, followed by Kiribati, and fifth the Bahamas. Ranking reflects percent of population at risk, published in November 14 & 28, 2011 The New York Times Upfront.[1] See also Regional effects of global warming.

141.218.35.38 (talk) 01:48, 8 June 2012 (UTC)

  1. We don't have evidence, other than an adaptation of the president of Nauru's speech, that there is any such report. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 05:41, 8 June 2012 (UTC)
  2. Even if there were a report, it wouldn't be relevant to this article. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 06:37, 8 June 2012 (UTC)

welcome new editors.....and why I reverted to version 520672044[edit]

Welcome to all the wiki newcomers who have recently edited this article. I wish wiki existed when I was taking classes. Great project.

I reverted to the old version NOT because I think your ideas stink but because making partial edits and leaving stuff undone is fine among your study group but this is an online accessible world-wide encyclopedia. You can see which pages get the most traffic here. This is not one of them. Still the way to go about this is to create a draft page under one of your user pages or user talk pages. Although I reverted you can use the Version history page to retrieve your efforts so far and then copy that work onto your draft page where you decide to create it.

You can all work on the draft edits there without messing up the real mccoy here. Then when you are happy with a section you can post them in section by section. Of course you will have to watch for edits by 3rd parties in the meantime and maybe make some last minute changes to incorporate other peoples work when you are ready to go live with a paragraph or two.

Please do NOT fiddle faddle with section headings and then vanish. That is highly unprofessional. Although it is in dire need of updating and improvements it is still "live" and in a sense is a finsished product. So be careful please. And welcome to wiki! Do drafts on the side; merge in completed sections only when you would be happy to get your final grade on that part of the work.

Enjoy NewsAndEventsGuy (talk) 03:35, 3 November 2012 (UTC)

I've attempted to clean up some redundancy and format refs. Haven't messed with content ... some fixin' needed. Vsmith (talk) 19:21, 3 November 2012 (UTC)

Um, didn't [2] duplicate the article? William M. Connolley (talk) 19:50, 3 November 2012 (UTC)
Yes, it did. I undid that but there's still some other work to do... bobrayner (talk) 21:21, 3 November 2012 (UTC)

Dupe[edit]

This article has huge overlap with Effects_of_global_warming#Social_systems. That section claims this as a "seemain" but it isn't really. This stuff should be in only one place William M. Connolley (talk) 19:55, 3 November 2012 (UTC)

Yep. NewsAndEventsGuy (talk) 21:05, 14 November 2012 (UTC)
Ah, I was just heading over to your talk page to say "WTF is going on here?" So, how about starting off with the very basic: should this article exist at all? If the answer is Yes, "Should it exist in its present shape"? William M. Connolley (talk) 21:08, 14 November 2012 (UTC)
Seems a student group, new to wikipedia, have adopted this article as a class project. I advised them to think about the scope of the article in outline form, as it relates to other aticles, before getting too into editing text. That advice appears to have fallen on deaf ears. See more of the discussion at the teacher/projectcoordinators talk page Ppowers29 (talk · contribs). I agree the first thing that should hapen if figuring out how this article fits in the branching tree with a minimum of overlap. NewsAndEventsGuy (talk) 21:28, 14 November 2012 (UTC)

tags[edit]

Today I added several inline templates and some inline hidden comments mostly about POV and editorializing. I tagged the article even though I know some students are working on correcting the problems. NewsAndEventsGuy (talk) 05:32, 10 November 2012 (UTC)

OK, I've addressed the tags of neurality and length. Please comment. Do I have more work to do on the introduction? Students are still uploading their parts of this article, so the subheadings are still unfinished.Penny Powers (talk) 22:21, 13 November 2012 (UTC)

Students are still uploading their parts of this article - oh dear, that isn't encouraging. This isn't a playpen William M. Connolley (talk) 20:43, 14 November 2012 (UTC)
Bob and I both advocated that students work in a sandbox somewhere and that parts ONLY get uploaded when really really rootin tootin ready. NewsAndEventsGuy (talk) 21:04, 14 November 2012 (UTC)

Moved to a sandbox. Penny Powers (talk) 21:19, 14 November 2012 (UTC)

OK I restored version 520541377, from Oct 30 (plus I changed Main article links). I hope you are not discouraged.... it is exciting to see everyones interest, but it does need to comport with the policies, guidelines, and manual of style; I look forward to seeing the results NewsAndEventsGuy (talk) 22:27, 14 November 2012 (UTC)

Now remove the banner from the talk page for this article that says it is the subject of a course assignment at Thompson Rivers University. Penny Powers (talk) 22:33, 14 November 2012 (UTC)

You can if that is what suits your needs. Or you can leave it if that is what suits your needs. I hope you do not get the feeling your students may not edit this. We just expect them to participate within the process, together with the rest of us, while editing each article in the context of the full tree of articles. If they can do that then all your input will be a great improvement! NewsAndEventsGuy (talk) 22:40, 14 November 2012 (UTC)

Merging content from "climate change, industry and society"[edit]

There is another article called climate change, industry and society which is quite similar to this one. On Talk:climate change, industry and society#Rename article, I've suggested that climate change, industry and society is renamed "impacts of climate change on human health". Content in climate change, industry and society which is unrelated to health impacts would be moved to this article. My proposed edit would proceed as follows:

  1. Add relevant template messages (Wikipedia:Template messages/Merging) to "climate change, industry and society" and "Effects of climate change on humans".
  2. Collate information on human health impacts from Effects of climate change on humans and climate change, industry and society
  3. Move information on human health impacts to climate change, industry and society.
  4. Move information on other social impacts from climate change, industry and society to Effects of climate change on humans
  5. Rename climate change, industry and society "impacts of climate change on human health".

Enescot (talk) 05:06, 19 January 2013 (UTC)

Rough draft of merge

I've put together a rough draft of this article, with content added and merged from climate change, industry and society. As I said before, I suggest that information on health impacts from this article be moved to climate change, industry and society. Climate change, industry and society can then be renamed something like "impacts of climate change/global warming on human health".

The draft text contains the same text as the existing two articles. I've had to move some of the text around a bit and do some restructuring.

To make it easier for me to edit, I've omitted citations from the draft. The draft text is based on existing citations from this article and climate change, industry and society. Internal links are also missing from my draft. Enescot (talk) 06:25, 15 March 2013 (UTC)

Draft text is below:


(lead section unchanged)


Vulnerability[edit]

The ability to predict how climate change may affect industry, settlement and society is limited by uncertainites about climate change and future developments in social and economic systems (Wilbanks et al., 2007:364).[1] Research therefore often focuses on vulnerabilities to impacts of climate change, rather than predicting the actual impacts themselves. IPCC (2007d) defined vulnerability (to climate change) as "the degree to which a system is susceptible to, and unable to cope with, adverse effects of climate change, including climate variability and extremes" (p. 89).[2] Vulnerabilities in developed areas are often focused on physical assets and infrastructures, with their associated economic value and replacement costs, and their linkages to global markets. In less developed areas, vulnerabilities are often focused on human populations and institutions. Compared with developed countries, the economic costs associated with vulnerabilities in developing countries might be larger as a proportion of the total economy. This is because the economies in developing countries tend to be based more heavily on climate-sensitive activities, like agriculture, than the economies of developed countries (Smith et al., 2001:938-941).[3]

General effects[edit]

Gradual climate change, e.g., increased mean temperature, can be associated with thresholds at which the resilience of human systems[clarification needed] switches from adequate to inadequate, such as water-supply infrastructures faced with shrinking water availability (Wilbanks et al., 2007:364).[1] Climate change can also be associated with changes in extreme events, e.g., changes in the magnitude, frequency and/or intensity of storms. With very high confidence, Wilbanks et al. (2007:359) concluded that most of the vulnerabilities to climate change of industry, settlements and society were related to changes in extreme events, rather than to gradual climate change. Not all implications of possible climate change are negative. For instance, many mid- and upper-latitude areas might see quality-of-life benefits from winter warming. Economic sectors, settlements and social groups can be affected by climate change response policies. For instance, efforts to reduce GHG emissions can affect economies whose development paths are dependent on abundant local fossil-fuel resources.

Human settlement[edit]

A number of scientists indicate that climate change will likely increase heat stress in summers while reducing cold-weather stresses in winter (Wilbanks et al., 2007:371-373).[1] Other likely changes include:

  • changes in precipitation patterns and water availability
  • rising sea levels in coastal locations
  • increased risk of extreme weather events, such as severe storms and flooding. Some kinds of extreme events could decrease, such as blizzards and ice storms.

Social issues[edit]

The consequences of climate change and poverty are not distributed uniformly within communities. Individual and social factors such as gender, age, education, ethnicity, geography and language lead to differential vulnerability and capacity to adapt to the effects of climate change. Climate change effects such as hunger, poverty and diseases like diarrhea and malaria, disproportionately impact children, i.e. about 90 percent of malaria and diarrhea deaths are among young children.[9]

There are several serious issues for climate change impacts and response, including (Wilbanks et al., 2007:373-374):[1]

  • The poor, who make up half of the world's population, cannot afford adaptation mechanisms to climate change, such as air conditioning or climate-risk insurance.
  • Impacts in developing countries, where more than 90% of the deaths related to natural disasters occur, and 43% of the urban slums are located.
  • Impacts of climate change are likely to be felt most acutely not only by the poor, but by certain segments of the population, such as the elderly, the very young, indigenous people, and recent immigrants. Impacts will also differ according to gender, particularly in developing countries.

Key vulnerabilities[edit]

Most of the key vulnerabilities to climate change are related to (a) climate phenomena that exceed thresholds for adaptation, i.e., extreme weather events and/or abrupt climate change, and (b) limited access to resources (financial, technical, human, institutional) to cope (Wilbanks et al., 2007:374-376).[1] In a literature assessment, Wilbanks et al. (2007:374-376) described key vulnerabilities of industry, settlements and society to climate change. Based on their expert judgement, the authors of the assessment gave each key vulnerability a confidence level. These confidence levels reflect the degree of belief that the authors had in their conclusions being correct: Very high confidence: Interactions between climate change and urbanization: this is most notable in developing countries, where urbanization is often focused in vulnerable areas, e.g., coastal areas. High confidence:

  • Interactions between climate change and global economic growth: stresses due to climate change are not only linked to the impacts of climate change, but also to the impacts of climate change policies. For example, these policies might affect development paths by requiring high cost fuel choices.
  • Fixed physical infrastructures that are important in meeting human needs: These include infrastructures that are susceptible to damage from extreme weather events or sea-level rise, and/or infrastructures that are already close to being inadequate.

Medium confidence: Interactions with governmental and social/cultural structures that are already stressed in some places by other kinds of pressures, e.g., limited economic resources.

Effects of extreme weather[edit]

See also: List of costliest Atlantic hurricanes and Physical impacts of climate change As the World Meteorological Organization explains, "recent increase in societal impact from tropical cyclones has largely been caused by rising concentrations of population and infrastructure in coastal regions."[25] Pielke et al. (2008) normalized mainland U.S. hurricane damage from 1900 to 2005 to 2005 values and found no remaining trend of increasing absolute damage. The 1970s and 1980s were notable because of the extremely low amounts of damage compared to other decades. The decade 1996–2005 has the second most damage among the past 11 decades, with only the decade 1926–1935 surpassing its costs. The most damaging single storm is the 1926 Miami hurricane, with $157 billion of normalized damage.[26] The American Insurance Journal predicted that "catastrophe losses should be expected to double roughly every 10 years because of increases in construction costs, increases in the number of structures and changes in their characteristics."[27] The Association of British Insurers has stated that limiting carbon emissions would avoid 80% of the projected additional annual cost of tropical cyclones by the 2080s. The cost is also increasing partly because of building in exposed areas such as coasts and floodplains. The ABI claims that reduction of the vulnerability to some inevitable effects of climate change, for example through more resilient buildings and improved flood defences, could also result in considerable cost-savings in the longterm.[28]

Systems and sectors[edit]

Environment[edit]

Climate change may dramatically impact habitat loss, for example, arid conditions may cause the collapse of rainforests, as has occurred in the past.[7]

Coasts and low-lying areas[edit]

For historical reasons to do with trade, many of the world's largest and most prosperous cities are on the coast. In developing countries, the poorest often live on floodplains, because it is the only available space, or fertile agricultural land. These settlements often lack infrastructure such as dykes and early warning systems. Poorer communities also tend to lack the insurance, savings or access to credit needed to recover from disasters. In a journal paper, Nicholls and Tol (2006) considered the effects of sea level rise:[4] [...] The most vulnerable future worlds to sea-level rise appear to be the A2 and B2 [IPCC] scenarios, which primarily reflects differences in the socio-economic situation (coastal population, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and GDP/capita), rather than the magnitude of sea-level rise. Small islands and deltaic settings stand out as being more vulnerable as shown in many earlier analyses. Collectively, these results suggest that human societies will have more choice in how they respond to sea-level rise than is often assumed. However, this conclusion needs to be tempered by recognition that we still do not understand these choices and significant impacts remain possible. Nicholls et al. (2007:338-339) assessed the literature on climate change impacts in coastal and low-lying areas.[5] They concluded that the socioeconomic impacts of climate change would be overwhelmingly adverse. With very high confidence, IPCC (2007d:48) projected that:[2]

  • coastal and low-lying areas would be exposed to increasing risks, including coastal erosion, due to climate change and sea level rise.
  • by the 2080s, many millions more people would experience floods every year due to sea level rise. The numbers affected were projected to be largest in the densely populated and low-lying megadeltas of Asia and Africa. Small islands were judged to be especially vulnerable.

A study in the April 2007 issue of Environment and Urbanization reports that 634 million people live in coastal areas within 30 feet (9.1 m) of sea level (McGranahan et al., 2007, p. 24).[6] The study also reported that about two thirds of the world's cities with over five million people are located in these low-lying coastal areas.

Northwest Passage[edit]

Arctic ice thicknesses changes from 1950s to 2050s simulated in one of GFDL's R30 atmosphere-ocean general circulation model experiments Melting Arctic ice may open the Northwest Passage in summer, which would cut 5,000 nautical miles (9,000 km) from shipping routes between Europe and Asia. This would be of particular benefit for supertankers which are too big to fit through the Panama Canal and currently have to go around the tip of South America. According to the Canadian Ice Service, the amount of ice in Canada's eastern Arctic Archipelago decreased by 15% between 1969 and 2004.[7] In September 2007, the Arctic Ice Cap retreated far enough for the Northwest Passage to become navigable to shipping for the first time in recorded history.[8][unreliable source?] In August, 2008, melting sea ice simultaneously opened up the Northwest Passage and the Northern Sea Route, making it possible to sail around the Arctic ice cap.[9] The Northwest Passage opened August 25, 2008, and the remaining tongue of ice blocking the Northern Sea Route dissolved a few days later. Because of Arctic shrinkage, the Beluga Shipping group of Bremen, Germany, announced plans to send the first ship through the Northern Sea Route in 2009.[9]

Energy sector[edit]

Oil, coal and natural gas[edit]

Oil and natural gas infrastructure is vulnerable to the effects and climate change and the increased risk of disasters such as storm, cyclones, flooding and long-term increases in sea level.[10] Minimising these risks by building in less-disaster prone areas can be expensive and impossible in countries with coastal locations or island states.[10] Secondly, all thermal power stations depend on water to cool them.[10] This has to be fresh water as salt water can be corrosive.[10] Not only is there increased demand for fresh water, but climate change can increase the likelihood of drought and fresh water shortages.[10] Thirdly, another impact for thermal power plants is that increasing the temperatures in which they operate reduces their efficiency and hence their output.[10] Fourthly, the source of oil often comes from areas prone to high natural disaster risks, such as tropical storms, hurricanes, cyclones and floods.[10] An example is that of Hurricane Katrina's impact on oil extraction in the Gulf of Mexico, as it destroyed 126 oil and gas platforms and damaged 183 more.[10] However previously pristine arctic areas will now be available for resource extraction[11]

Nuclear[edit]

Climate change, extreme weather and natural disasters can affect nuclear power plants in a similar way to those using oil, coal and natural gas.[10] The damage caused to nuclear power plants is most tragically demonstrated by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.[10] However, the impact of water shortages on nuclear power plants is perhaps more visible than on other thermal power plants.[10] Seawater is corrosive and so nuclear energy supply is likely to be negatively affected by the fresh water shortage.[10] This generic problem may become increasingly significant over time.[10] This can force nuclear reactors to be shut down, as happened in France during the 2003 and 2006 heat waves. Nuclear power supply was severely diminished by low river flow rates and droughts, which meant rivers had reached the maximum temperatures for cooling reactors.[10] During the heat waves, 17 reactors had to limit output or shut down. 77% of French electricity is produced by nuclear power and in 2009 a similar situation created a 8GW shortage and forced the French government to import electricity.[10] Other cases have been reported from Germany, where extreme temperatures have reduced nuclear power production 9 times due to high temperatures between 1979 and 2007.[10] In particular:

  • the Unterweser nuclear power plant reduced output by 90% between June and September 2003[10]
  • the Isar nuclear power plant cut production by 60% for 14 days due to excess river temperatures and low stream flow in the river Isar in 2006[10]

Similar events have happened elsewhere in Europe during those same hot summers.[10] If global warming continues, this disruption is likely to increase.

Hydroelectricity[edit]

Changes in the amount of river flow will correlate with the amount of energy produced by a dam. Lower river flows because of drought, climate change or upstream dams and diversions will reduce the amount of live storage in a reservoir therefore reducing the amount of water that can be used for hydroelectricity. The result of diminished river flow can be power shortages in areas that depend heavily on hydroelectric power. The risk of flow shortage may increase as a result of climate change.[10] Studies from the Colorado River in the United States suggest that modest climate changes, such as an increase in temperature in 2 degree Celsius resulting in a 10% decline in precipitation, might reduce river run-off by up to 40%.[10] Brazil in particular is vulnerable due to its heaving reliance on hydroelectricity, as increasing temperatures, lower water flow and alterations in the rainfall regime, could reduce total energy production by 7% annually by the end of the century.[10]

Insurance[edit]

An industry very directly affected by the risks is the insurance industry.[12] According to a 2005 report from the Association of British Insurers, limiting carbon emissions could avoid 80% of the projected additional annual cost of tropical cyclones by the 2080s.[13] A June 2004 report by the Association of British Insurers declared "Climate change is not a remote issue for future generations to deal with. It is, in various forms, here already, impacting on insurers' businesses now."[14] It noted that weather risks for households and property were already increasing by 2–4% per year due to changing weather, and that claims for storm and flood damages in the UK had doubled to over £6 billion over the period 1998–2003, compared to the previous five years. The results are rising insurance premiums, and the risk that in some areas flood insurance will become unaffordable for some. Financial institutions, including the world's two largest insurance companies, Munich Re and Swiss Re, warned in a 2002 study that "the increasing frequency of severe climatic events, coupled with social trends" could cost almost US$ 150 billion each year in the next decade.[15] These costs would, through increased costs related to insurance and disaster relief, burden customers, taxpayers, and industry alike. In the United States, insurance losses have also greatly increased. According to Choi and Fisher (2003) each 1% increase in annual precipitation could enlarge catastrophe loss by as much as 2.8%.[16] Gross increases are mostly attributed to increased population and property values in vulnerable coastal areas, though there was also an increase in frequency of weather-related events like heavy rainfalls since the 1950s.[17]

Transport[edit]

Roads, airport runways, railway lines and pipelines, (including oil pipelines, sewers, water mains etc.) may require increased maintenance and renewal as they become subject to greater temperature variation. Regions already adversely affected include areas of permafrost, which are subject to high levels of subsidence, resulting in buckling roads, sunken foundations, and severely cracked runways.[18]

Water resources[edit]

See also: Water crisis


As the climate warms, it changes the nature of global rainfall, evaporation, snow, stream flow and other factors that affect water supply and quality. Freshwater resources are highly sensitive to variations in weather and climate. Climate change is projected to affect water availability. In areas where the amount of water in rivers and streams depends on snow melting, warmer temperatures increase the fraction of precipitation falling as rain rather than as snow, causing the annual spring peak in water runoff to occur earlier in the year. This can lead to an increased likelihood of winter flooding and reduced late summer river flows. Rising sea levels cause saltwater to enter into fresh underground water and freshwater streams. This reduces the amount of freshwater available for drinking and farming. Warmer water temperatures also affect water quality and accelerate water pollution.[16]

In a literature assessment, Kundzewicz et al. (2007:175) concluded, with high confidence, that:[19]

  • the negative impacts of climate change on freshwater systems outweigh the benefits. All of the regions assessed in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, Europe, Latin America, North America, Polar regions (Arctic and Antarctic), and small islands) showed an overall net negative impact of climate change on water resources and freshwater ecosystems.
  • Semi-arid and arid areas are particularly exposed to the impacts of climate change on freshwater. With very high confidence, it was judged that many of these areas, e.g., the Mediterranean basin, western USA, southern Africa, and north-eastern Brazil, would suffer a decrease in water resources due to climate change.
Scarcity[edit]

Sea level rise is projected to increase salt-water intrusion into groundwater in some regions, affecting drinking water and agriculture in coastal zones.[20] Increased evaporation will reduce the effectiveness of reservoirs. Increased extreme weather means more water falls on hardened ground unable to absorb it, leading to flash floods instead of a replenishment of soil moisture or groundwater levels. In some areas, shrinking glaciers threaten the water supply.[21] The continued retreat of glaciers will have a number of different effects. In areas that are heavily dependent on water runoff from glaciers that melt during the warmer summer months, a continuation of the current retreat will eventually deplete the glacial ice and substantially reduce or eliminate runoff. A reduction in runoff will affect the ability to irrigate crops and will reduce summer stream flows necessary to keep dams and reservoirs replenished. This situation is particularly acute for irrigation in South America, where numerous artificial lakes are filled almost exclusively by glacial melt.[22] Central Asian countries have also been historically dependent on the seasonal glacier melt water for irrigation and drinking supplies. In Norway, the Alps, and the Pacific Northwest of North America, glacier runoff is important for hydropower. Higher temperatures will also increase the demand for water for the purposes of cooling and hydration. In the Sahel, there has been an unusually wet period from 1950 until 1970, followed by extremely dry years from 1970 to 1990. From 1990 until 2004 rainfall returned to levels slightly below the 1898–1993 average, but year-to-year variability was high.[23][24]

Health[edit]

Human beings are exposed to climate change through changing weather patterns (temperature, precipitation, sea-level rise and more frequent extreme events) and indirectly through changes in water, air and food quality and changes in ecosystems, agriculture, industry and settlements and the economy (Confalonieri et al., 2007:393).[25] According to a literature assessment by Confalonieri et al. (2007:393), the effects of climate change to date have been small, but are projected to progressively increase in all countries and regions.


Development[edit]

The combined effects of global warming may have particularly harsh effects on people and countries without the resources to mitigate those effects. This may slow economic development and poverty reduction, and make it harder to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).[52] In October 2004 the Working Group on Climate Change and Development, a coalition of development and environment NGOs, issued a report Up in Smoke on the effects of climate change on development. This report, and the July 2005 report Africa - Up in Smoke? predicted increased hunger and disease due to decreased rainfall and severe weather events, particularly in Africa. These are likely to have severe impacts on development for those affected. In a literature assessment, Yohe et al. (2007:813) concluded that climate change would very likely make it more difficult for nations to achieve the MDGs for the middle of the century.[53] In the short-term, it was judged very likely that climate change (as attributed with high confidence to human activities) would not be a significant extra impediment to nations reaching their 2015 Millennium Development Targets.

Displacement/migration[edit]

Climate change causes displacement of people in several ways, the most obvious—and dramatic—being through the increased number and severity of weather-related disasters which destroy homes and habitats causing people to seek shelter or livelihoods elsewhere. Slow onset phenomena, including effects of climate change such as desertification and rising sea levels gradually erode livelihoods and force communities to abandon traditional homelands for more accommodating environments. This is currently happening in areas of Africa’s Sahel, the semi-arid belt that spans the continent just below its northern deserts. Deteriorating environments triggered by climate change can also lead to increased conflict over resources which in turn can displace people.[17] Extreme environmental events are increasingly recognized as a key driver of migration across the world. According to the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, more than 42 million people were displaced in Asia and the Pacific during 2010 and 2011, more than twice the population of Sri Lanka. This figure includes those displaced by storms, floods, and heat and cold waves. Still others were displaced drought and sea-level rise. Most of those compelled to leave their homes eventually returned when conditions improved, but an undetermined number became migrants, usually within their country, but also across national borders.[18] Asia and the Pacific is the global area most prone to natural disasters, both in terms of the absolute number of disasters and of populations affected. It is highly exposed to climate impacts, and is home to highly vulnerable population groups, who are disproportionately poor and marginalized. A recent Asian Development Bank report highlights “environmental hot spots” that are particular risk of flooding, cyclones, typhoons, and water stress.[19]

Some Pacific Ocean island nations, such as Tuvalu, Kiribati, and the Maldives,[54] are concerned about the possibility of an eventual evacuation, as flood defense may become economically unviable for them, creating climate refugees. Tuvalu already has an ad hoc agreement with New Zealand to allow phased relocation.[55]

To reduce migration compelled by worsening environmental conditions, and to strengthen resilience of at-risk communities, governments should adopt polices and commit financing to social protection, livelihoods development, basic urban infrastructure development, and disaster risk management. Though every effort should be made to ensure that people can stay where they live, it is also important to recognize that migration can also be a way for people to cope with environmental changes. If properly managed, and efforts made to protect the rights of migrants, migration can provide substantial benefits to both origin and destination areas, as well as to the migrants themselves. However, migrants – particularly low-skilled ones – are among the most vulnerable people in society and are often denied basic protections and access to services.[19] The links between the gradual environmental degradation of climate change and displacement are complex: as the decision to migrate is taken at the household level, it is difficult to measure the respective influence of climate change in these decisions with regard to other influencing factors, such as poverty, population growth or employment options.[20] This situates the debate on environmental migration in a highly contested field: the use of the term 'environmental refugee', although commonly used in some contexts, is disrecommended by agencies such as the UNHCR who argue that the term 'refugee' has a strict legal definition which does not apply to environmental migrants.[21] Neither the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change nor its Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement on climate change, includes any provisions concerning specific assistance or protection for those who will be directly affected by climate change.[22]


Estimates[edit]

According to Wilbanks et al. (2007:365), estimates of the number of people who may become environmental migrants are, at best, guessword since:[1]

  • migrations in areas impacted by climate change are not one-way and permanent
  • the reasons for migration are often multiple and complex, and thus do not relate straightforwardly to climate change
  • there are few reliable censuses or surveys in many parts of the world on which to base such estimates
  • there is a lack of agreement on what an environmental migrant is.

In the 1990s a variety of estimates placed the number of environmental refugees at around 25 million. (Environmental refugees are not included in the official definition of refugees, which only includes migrants fleeing persecution.) The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which advises the world’s governments under the auspices of the UN, estimated that 150 million environmental refugees will exist in the year 2050, due mainly to the effects of coastal flooding, shoreline erosion and agricultural disruption (150 million means 1.5% of 2050’s predicted 10 billion world population).[56][57]

Security and conflict[edit]

See also: Military Advisory Board

Conflicts are typically extremely complex with multiple inter-dependent causalities, often referred to as ‘complex emergencies.’ Climate change has the potential to exacerbate existing tensions or create new ones — serving as a threat multiplier. It can be a catalyst for violent conflict and a threat to international security.[23][24]

An argument can be made that rising ethnic conflicts may be linked to competition over natural resources that are increasingly scarce as a result of climate change (Wilbanks et al., 2007:365).[1] According to Wilbanks et al. (2007:365), other factors need to be taken into account. It was suggested that major environmentally-influenced conflicts in Africa have more to do with the relative abundance of resources, e.g., oil and diamonds, than with resource scarcity. On this basis, Wilbanks et al. (2007:365) suggested that predictions of future conflicts due climate change should be viewed with caution. Schneider et al. (2007:787) assessed the literature on key vulnerabilities to climate change.[58] With high confidence, they predicted that stresses such as increased drought, water shortages, and riverine and coastal flooding would affect many local and regional populations. With medium confidence, it was predicted that these stresses would lead, in some cases, to relocation within or between countries. This might have the effect of exacerbating conflicts, and possibly impose migration pressures.



The United Nations Security Council held its first-ever debate on the impact of climate change in 2007. The links between climate change and security have been the subject of numerous high-profile reports since 2007 by leading security figures in the United States, United Kingdom and the European Union. The G77 group of developing nations also considers climate change to be a major security threat which is expected to hit developing nations particularly hard. The links between the human impact of climate change and the threat of violence and armed conflict are particularly important because multiple destabilizing conditions are affected simultaneously.

The Military Advisory Board, a panel of retired U.S. generals and admirals released a report entitled "National Security and the Threat of Climate Change." The report predicts that global warming will have security implications, in particular serving as a "threat multiplier" in already volatile regions.[59] Britain's Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett argues that "An unstable climate will exacerbate some of the core drivers of conflict, such as migratory pressures and competition for resources."[60] And several weeks earlier, U.S. Senators Chuck Hagel (R-NB) and Richard Durbin (D-IL) introduced a bill in the U.S. Congress that would require federal intelligence agencies to collaborate on a National Intelligence Estimate to evaluate the security challenges presented by climate change.[61] In November 2007, two Washington think tanks, the established Center for Strategic and International Studies and the newer Center for a New American Security, published a report analysing the worldwide security implications of three different global warming scenarios. The report considers three different scenarios, two over a roughly 30 year perspective and one covering the time up to 2100. Its general results conclude that flooding "...has the potential to challenge regional and even national identities. Armed conflict between nations over resources, such as the Nile and its tributaries, is likely..." and that "Perhaps the most worrisome problems associated with rising temperatures and sea levels are from large-scale migrations of people — both inside nations and across existing national borders."[62] A 2009 study questions the assumption that rising temperatures and violence are linked. Richard Tol and Sebastian Wagner collected data on climate and conflict in Europe between the years 1000 and 2000. They concluded that until the mid-18th century, there was a significant negative correlation between the number of conflicts and average temperature, but after that no statistically meaningful relationship can be observed. Tol and Wagner argue that the relationship between warfare and colder weather disappears around the time of the industrial revolution, when agriculture and transport improve dramatically. The Economist suggests that the lesson of their research is that climate-induced conflict can be minimised by continuing the process of crop improvement.[63] A study by Zhang et al. (2009) used paleoclimate data (paleoclimate is the study of past climate) to examine large scale effects of climate change on the outbreak of war and population decline in the preindustrial era.[64] According to the study, long-term fluctuations of war frequency and population changes have followed cycles of temperature change.

See also[edit]

  • Environmental Security and Peace (University for Peace program)
  • Economics of global warming
  • Food security
  • Environmental Security and Peace
  • Long-term effects of global warming

Further reading[edit]

  • Addressing Climate Change in Asia & the Pacific 2012
  • Climate Change 2007: Synthesis Report, 4th Assessment Report, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
  • Report on the Economics of Climate Change (2006), Stern Review
  • Human Impact Report: The Anatomy of a Silent Crisis (2009), Global Humanitarian Forum
  • Key Points on Climate Justice: Working Paper of the Global Humanitarian Forum
  • "What Happened to the Seasons?". Oxfam Research Report.
  • Human Development Report 2007/2008, United Nations Development Programme
  • Maplecroft Climate Change Risk Report 2009/2010
  • Woodward, A. (1995). "Doctoring the planet: health effects of global change*". Australian and New Zealand Journal of Medicine 25 (1): 46–53. doi:10.1111/j.1445-5994.1995.tb00579.x. ISSN 00048291.
  • UNESCO (2011) 'Migration and Climate Change'
  • Piguet, E., Pécoud, A. and de Guchteneire, P. (2010) Migration and Climate Change: an Overview

Climate change, water stress, conflict and migration Proceedings of a conference in The Hague, September 2011

External links[edit]

  • List of United Nations Functional Commissions and Expert Bodies related to climate change

Climate change on the United Nations Economic and Social Development (UNESD) Division for Sustainable Development website.

  • Climate change on the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) website.
  • "Social Development – Social Dimensions of Climate Change". The World Bank.
  • The IPCC Working Group II (WG II) website body assesses the vulnerability of socio-economic and natural systems to climate change, negative and positive consequences of climate change, and options for adapting to it

Global Humanitarian Forum

  • Tck Tck Tck Time for Climate Justice campaign
  • United Nations Environment Programme and climate change
  • Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights human rights and climate change
  • Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees climate change
  • Care International Climate Change Information Centre
  • Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre
  • World Bank and Climate Change
  • World Meteorological Organization and climate
  • Climate change and human health on World Health Organization
  • International Alert climate change and violent conflict
  • International Strategy for Disaster Reduction disaster risk reduction and climate change
  • Health and environmental effects of climate change – US Environmental Protection Agency

Specific topics[edit]

  • Effects of global warming on skiing

Enescot (talk) 06:25, 15 March 2013 (UTC)


end of draft text


Restructuring update[edit]

I've made a start at restructuring these two articles. However, I've only recently found out that there's already an article on the Effects of global warming on human health. This means that my suggestion of renaming climate change, industry and society (CCIS) to the Effects of global warming on human health (GWHH) cannot go ahead. I suggest that the content on human health in CCIS and Effects of climate change on humans be moved to GWHH. Enescot (talk) 12:42, 29 July 2013 (UTC)

It should be made more clear that 1 article focuses on humans in general "Society" and the other in particular on health impacts. Prokaryotes (talk) 08:53, 30 August 2013 (UTC)

Removal of study on violence[edit]

A user https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Effects_of_climate_change_on_humans&diff=570784591&oldid=570758660 recently added the following study = "A study suggests past surges in temperature have boosted conflicts.[2][3]". However, user Arthur Rubin reverted it with = "don't see why it's legitimate. Please discuss on talk page". The reason to include this reference is because it assesses 60 studies and is the missing reference for the "Security" section of this wikipedia page. Prokaryotes (talk) 12:23, 30 August 2013 (UTC)

I have to take a cat to the vet this morning, so I'll be brief. New Scientist is a problematic source, at best; the original Science source is promising (but not for that exact statement), and the New Scientist article also notes that the study and its methodology is questioned. Also, research would need to be done to determine whether the Science article is a quasi-editorial, which means it's a primary source, and should not be used unless a secondary source reports on it favorably, which the New Scientist article does not.) I should add that the IP-jumping blocked editor who added the material originally is also known for using sources to verify material not actually there, so, even if I suspected he was attempting to improve Wikipedia, I would be justified in removing it, not merely as revert a blocked editor. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 14:56, 30 August 2013 (UTC)

Redundant data on company actions[edit]

Currently cleaning up the article, these are parts i removed because they lack citation over 24 month or seem redundant because not in the scope of effects on humans.

Since so little research has been conducted into the human impacts of climate change and because of the difficulty in differentiating the influence of climate change from other contributing factors, statistics relating to the human impact of climate change carry significant margins of uncertainty.[clarification needed] Particularly on a global level, much of the statistical data on the human impact of climate change should only be considered as being indicative of the order of magnitude of impact.[clarification needed]
Though there has been inadequate research (and policy-related discussion) on the human impacta of climate change, a number of organizations are raising the profile of this issue by organizing various high-level meetings and publishing reports on the topic. Such organizations include Oxfam, the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations Environment Programme, the World Health Organization, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the Global Humanitarian Forum, Care International, Greenpeace, Maplecroft, the World Bank, and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. Prokaryotes (talk) 13:34, 30 August 2013 (UTC)


Redundant data General effects[edit]

Removed the section General effects, since data is out dated or unsourced and discussed in later sections anyway.

Gradual increased mean temperature, can be associated with thresholds at which the resilience of human systems switches from adequate to inadequate; such as water-supply infrastructures faced with shrinking water availability (Wilbanks et al., 2007:364).[4] Climate change can also be associated with changes in extreme events; such as changes in the magnitude, frequency and intensity of storms. With very high confidence, Wilbanks et al. (2007:359) concluded that most of the vulnerabilities to climate change of industry, settlements, and society were related to changes in extreme events, rather than to gradual climate change.
Not all implications of possible climate change are negative. For instance, many mid and higher elevated areas might see quality of life benefits from winter warming.(Wilbanks et al., 2007:365).[4] Economic sectors, settlements, and social groups, can be affected by climate change response policies. For instance: efforts to reduce GHG emissions can affect economies whose development paths are dependent on abundant local fossil-fuel resources. Prokaryotes (talk) 14:10, 30 August 2013 (UTC)


Redundant Northwest Passage[edit]

Leaving this here since it is not within the article scope.

Arctic ice thicknesses changes from 1950s to 2050s simulated in one of GFDL's R30 atmosphere-ocean general circulation model experiments
Melting Arctic ice may open the Northwest Passage in a not too distant summer[when?], which would cut 5,000 nautical miles (9,000 km) from shipping routes between Europe and Asia. This would be of particular benefit for supertankers which are too big to fit through the Panama Canal, and currently have to go around the tip of South America. According to the Canadian Ice Service, the amount of ice in Canada's eastern Arctic Archipelago decreased by 15% between 1969 and 2004.[5]
In September 2007, the Arctic Ice Cap retreated far enough for the Northwest Passage to become navigable to shipping for the first time in recorded history.[6][unreliable source]
In August, 2008, melting sea ice simultaneously opened up the Northwest Passage and the Northern Sea Route, making it possible to sail around the Arctic ice cap.[7] The Northwest Passage opened August 25, 2008, and the remaining tongue of ice blocking the Northern Sea Route dissolved a few days later. Because of Arctic shrinkage, the Beluga Shipping group of Bremen, Germany, announced plans to send the first ship through the Northern Sea Route in 2009.[7] Prokaryotes (talk) 14:40, 30 August 2013 (UTC)

Redundant Social issues[edit]

This section is already covered under the Social Impacts section and this part here is based on 2007 IPCC, not really up to date.

There are several serious issues for climate change impacts and response, including:[4]
  • The poor, who make up half of the world's population, cannot afford adaptation mechanisms to climate change; such as air conditioning or climate-risk insurance.
  • Impacts in developing countries are where more than 90% of the deaths related to natural disasters occur, and 43% of the urban slums are located.
  • Impacts of climate change are likely to be felt most acutely not only by the poor, but by certain segments of the population; such as the elderly, the very young, indigenous people, and recent immigrants. Impacts will also differ according to gender; particularly in developing countries. Prokaryotes (talk) 15:53, 30 August 2013 (UTC)

Reply[edit]

I don't agree, and I've restored an old version of this article. The IPCC 4th assessment report is the most authoritative source of information on the impacts of climate change. If there is a reliable source that conflicts with this information from the IPCC report, then you can add it to the article. Also, if you think the information is out-of-date, then you can add a suitable template.
I've also noticed that you've removed information from the Wilbanks et al citation. You changed it to:
Wilibanks (2007). "Chapter 7: Industry, Settlement and Society 2007:373-374". IPCC. 
The et al means and others, so I don't know why you deleted it. The IPCC report is not a journal. You've also removed most of the information from the citation:
Wilbanks, T.J.; et al. (2007). M.L. Parry et al. (eds.), ed. "Industry, settlement and society. In: Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change". Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K., and New York, N.Y., U.S.A. pp. 357–390. Retrieved 2009-05-20. . PDF version with page numbers.
Enescot (talk) 10:11, 1 September 2013 (UTC)
As pointed out above, the related IPCC additions can be found in later parts of the article. If that is your only concern, why not update the reference or add the IPCC section you deemed missing? The article is now in a worse state, includes a lot of OT content, has no images and less new information. Prokaryotes (talk) 10:35, 1 September 2013 (UTC)
Thanks for the response. I'll revert my revert. As I've already stated, I think that the IPCC report is still a valid source of information, and I do not agree that it is outdated. At present, however, I'm more interested in editing other articles instead of this one. As you probably know, the next climate change impact assessment by the IPCC will be published next year. Until then, I think that the conclusions of the IPCC 2007 assessment remain authoritative.
I also disagree with your removal of the section on the Northwest Passage. This is a significant issue for Polar regions [3], and in my opinion, it should be kept. One option would be to move the section to regional effects of global warming.
It was laziness on my part to revert all of your changes rather than restoring the text that I wanted to keep. Perhaps in the future I'll come back and do a proper job of restoring the information that I want to keep.
Enescot (talk) 09:46, 2 September 2013 (UTC)
Thanks Enescot, though i probably was a bit uncertain with my IPCC statement, though i will check if i can add above reference to the current version, since the PDF wasn't part of the wiki i believe (not sure). Regarding the NWP entry, i think this isn't within the scope and would fit better into regional effects, as you suggested. Mainly because it is of economic and geopolitical concern. However, there are at least 2 similar articles which describe effects on humans, though i thought this article best describes the scope from reading the title. At least my and other edits will help during a merger of articles. Prokaryotes (talk) 11:37, 2 September 2013 (UTC)
The IPCC report is currently linked with HTML + PDF under lede Key vuln. Prokaryotes (talk) 11:56, 2 September 2013 (UTC)

Cleaned up version of the article August 2013[edit]

Since the user Enescot (talk) has reverted a cleaned up article version with a lot of new data and images, i leave the link to the revision here https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Effects_of_climate_change_on_humans&diff=571057401&oldid=571054069 Prokaryotes (talk) 10:20, 1 September 2013 (UTC)


One-fourth of the world’s diseases[edit]

That sentence is badly paraphrased from published course notes. Even though Wheeling Jesuit University may be generally a reliable source "course notes" are not generally reliable. The original WHO document would be better, and we can see whether the course notes also badly paraphrased the WHO document. — Arthur Rubin (talk) 23:10, 20 January 2014 (UTC)

Title Problem[edit]

This article is all about the effect of global warming not broader "climate change". Global cooling is a type of "climate change" that has effects on humans. No global cooling effects are listed here. Capitalismojo (talk) 03:01, 29 March 2014 (UTC)

Suggest renaming/moving[edit]

This article is (as currently written) really about the prospective effects of global warming on humans, not the general effects of climate change. An article as broadly titled as this on the "effects of climate change" would have to speak about climate changes generally. These would perforce include historic "effects of climate change" such as the Little Ice Age, the Roman Warming Period, Ice Ages, etc. We could include such historic climate effects here, but given the thrust of the article it would probably be best just to do a renaming. Capitalismojo (talk) 21:18, 7 May 2015 (UTC)

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Referring to Earth as "our planet"[edit]

The first sentence says: Climate change has brought about possibly permanent alterations to [[Earth|our planet]]’s geological...

Why not just ...possibly permanent alterations to [[Earth]]’s geological...? ~barakokula31 (talk) 23:56, 21 April 2017 (UTC)

 DoneNewsAndEventsGuy (talk) 02:41, 23 April 2017 (UTC)

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This article should be renamed Negative Effects of global warming on humans[edit]

for some reason the Chicken Littles who put this article together completely ignored the fact that the first 2 deg C of warming are beneficial, even according to the IPCC. In no particular order, off the top of my head, higher crop yields, fewer deaths from cold, and fewer hurricanes. Greglocock (talk) 06:27, 15 July 2017 (UTC)

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