Talk:Emotional contagion

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mirror neurons[edit]

pretty sure this has been disproved, at least thats what i remember the mirror neurons page said. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.64.65.111 (talk) 00:51, 27 January 2011 (UTC)

Merge discussion for Emotional contagion [edit]

Emotional transmission is not a psychological term in emotions research and the definition provided on that page is rather poor. Moreover, the reference used is not of sufficient quality to introduce a new term. Emotional transmission should be merged into Emotional contagion , by adding an example that emotions can transfer from work into home.

With no objections present, I redirected Emotional transmission here. Killian441 (talk) 20:37, 28 October 2011 (UTC)

Autism[edit]

Lack of emotional contagion = autism ? Cuddlyable3 (talk) 13:14, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

Not at all! Yalie2013 (talk) 09:58, 3 August 2010 (UTC)
See Empathy#Cognitive_versus_affective_empathy for an alternative view on this. Lova Falk talk 14:57, 21 April 2013 (UTC)

Amygdala section borderline unintelligible[edit]

I just read that section about the amygdala in this article. It doesn't explain a damned thing beyond what the amygdala is. Needs a rewrite by someone who knows this shit.--61.217.208.88 (talk) 05:46, 10 May 2010 (UTC)

The Amygdala section isn't explicitly linked to the remainder of the article. Without explicit linkages, it's clear why it is included. Robertekraut (talk) 14:51, 12 September 2017 (UTC)

Children[edit]

Regarding the assertions:

  1. If you smile you feel happy, if you frown you feel bad.
  2. Hour old infants are wired to mimic a person's facial gestures.

This contradicts (1) Piaget's observation that children recognize faces as faces at about 8 months (not at birth), and (2) observations that newborns have cloudy vision. Citation needed. Simplistic folk beliefs and pseudoscience will be challenged and removed. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 174.28.252.69 (talk) 19:46, 5 July 2010 (UTC)

Reverse emotional contagion[edit]

Is there a term for the opposite of emotional contagion? That is, involuntary feelings of the exact opposite of another persons emotions? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.160.35.39 (talk) 02:43, 25 December 2011 (UTC)

Maybe Emotional detachment? Lova Falk talk 14:25, 21 April 2013 (UTC)
Could be also you combatting unconscious contagion (primary emotion) with the opposite emotion as antidote. (I had this experience farily often, the driving force behind being the will to control my feelings) 89.177.89.174 (talk) 19:13, 19 June 2013 (UTC)

Educational Assignment[edit]

Njbetz (talk) 15:01, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

Why not include link to an example?[edit]

Last December, I added the following:

"Paul Potts audition for Britain's Got Talent is a good example, showing a group of people becoming visibly resonate with an individual. [1].The video clip has been viewed more than 100 million times, making it one of the most viewed videos on YouTube, presumably because people who watch it forward this type of awe-inspiring emotional contagion on to others."

While I have fewer than 40 hours of editing experience on wikiPedia, and can see what this might have too much POV language, I am very confused as to why an example like this would not be appropriate to include. Spending time adding something to wikiPedia only to discover it is removed instead of re-edited makes me feel like trying to add anything is likely to be a waste of time. I noted that the user who removed the edit was not logged in, but does have lots of other edits. Could someone more closely connected with the article consider putting this back in, with more "appropriate" phrasing? And let me know how I can avoid wasting time while still contributing?

DrMel (talk) 17:15, 17 July 2013 (UTC)

It's more than just the phrasing in itself, it's the fact that this sentence is unsourced and sounds like original research. You suggest that this is a example of emotional contagion, but your only source is the video itself. It would be better if you could link to a reliable source, such as a book, research article, et cetera, that says this is a good example. Reatlas (talk) 23:41, 17 July 2013 (UTC)

Good references for biological & functional basis of emotional contagion[edit]

The material in the current draft on the biological mechanisms underlying emotional contagion is weak. Portions of the following citation might be useful to include: Decety, J. (2011). Dissecting the neural mechanisms mediating empathy. Emotion Review, 3(1), 92-108[2].

This reference provides a review and an alternative explanation about the evolutionary advantages of emotional contagion: Hess, U., & Fischer, a. A. (2013). Emotional Mimicry as Social Regulation. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 17(2), 142–157.[3] Robertekraut (talk) 15:05, 12 September 2017 (UTC)

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  1. ^ www.youtube.com/watch?v=bskw0fLqYyM
  2. ^ Decety, Jean (10 January 2011). "Dissecting the Neural Mechanisms Mediating Empathy". Emotion Review. 3 (1): 92–108. doi:10.1177/1754073910374662. 
  3. ^ Hess, Ursula; Fischer, Agneta (24 January 2013). "Emotional Mimicry as Social Regulation". Personality and Social Psychology Review. 17 (2): 142–157. doi:10.1177/1088868312472607.