Talk:Ent

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What is a traditional ent[edit]

This article is of poor quality. It states what an ent is and than it says it's very different from a traditional ent?! what is a traditional ent and what kind of ent did I just read a description of? --60.40.63.114 05:13, 12 January 2006 (UTC)

This is explained in the etymology section. I completely missed it myself, and was complaining about it before I noticed it. I am adding a link from "traditional ent" to the etymology section to make it more clear (since at least two users have now apparently suffered from selective blindness in regards to the etymology section...) --Jaysweet 20:43, 28 July 2006 (UTC)

Why the move?[edit]

Tolkien Ents are overwhelmingly what people think of when they hear Ent. Tolkien popularized modern usage of the term. Practically no one even knows that there's any other use. Why disambiguate? There's not really enough material between Ent (Middle-earth) and Ent (fiction) to require that it be divided into two articles. -Aranel ("Sarah") 13:16, 8 August 2005 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

Tolkien's Ents are overwhelmingly what people think about when they hear Ent today. According to standard disambiguation procedures, the article on Tolkien's Ents should be what people get when they go to an article of that name. Actually, I'd prefer to see Ent (fiction) merged back into one article on Ents—none of the articles is big enough to require a split. -Aranel ("Sarah") 20:23, 28 August 2005 (UTC)

  • Comment: An obvious case of primary disambiguation, indeed. It is, however, important to preserve the history of the article. I suggest to simply revert splitting the original, the sad remains of which are currently located at ent (fiction), and to move it back to ent. -- Naive cynic 21:20, 28 August 2005 (UTC)
    • I don't actually know why it was moved in the first place. I haven't been able to find any discussion. -Aranel ("Sarah") 01:52, 29 August 2005 (UTC)
  • Support. Should be non-controversial. Josiah Rowe 00:54, 29 August 2005 (UTC)
  • Support, obviously. ENT should redirect to Otolaryngology. — Knowledge Seeker 00:32, September 1, 2005 (UTC)
  • Support and I agree with Knowledge Seeker. Jonathunder 00:40, 2005 September 3 (UTC)

This article has been renamed after the result of a move request. I also fixed the lost history. Dragons flight 07:56, September 4, 2005 (UTC)

Wont?[edit]

I the "In tolkien's works" section there's this phrase: "They were apparently created by Eru Ilúvatar at the behest of Yavanna after she learned of Aulë's children, the Dwarves, knowing that they would be wont to fell trees." what does this mean? In wiktionary it says wont is "One's habitual way of doing things". If this is what wont means then the phrase doesn't make sense to me.

in oxford gendaiei eijiten wont is defined as: "old-fashioned, formal: in the habit of doing sth"

It means that the Dwarves would be in the habit of felling trees to feed their forges. Yavanna was concerned that because Aulë was only interested in the things he could make, so also the Dwarves would only be interested in the things they could make. She believed that they would only see the trees as a source of fuel, not as something to enjoy in their own right. — db48x | Talk 17:50, 2 May 2006 (UTC)

Film Adaptation[edit]

I've noticed that other LOTR articles have a section on how various characters are portrayed differently in the films then the books. This article might also benefit from one. One diff, for example, is the fact that, in the book, the ents decide to attack Orthanc at the end of the entmoot, while in the film, Merry and Pippin trick treebeard into finding the destruction before they decide to act. Prometheus-X303- 14:30, 30 October 2006 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Ent.jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:Ent.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in Wikipedia articles constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images uploaded after 4 May, 2006, and lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.BetacommandBot 04:28, 3 June 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Beechbone.jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:Beechbone.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 07:15, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

Entwives, "the concept of Ents has not yet entered Tolkien's mind"[edit]

At present, the article says "At the time of writing, the concept of Ents had not yet entered Tolkien's mind, and nothing further was done with the idea." However, Tolkien wrote the entire LoTR prior to any of them being published. The_Lord_of_the_Rings#Writing has references showing the completed manuscript for the complete work in 1946, and final revisions in 1949, both were before the first third was published in 1950. Consequently, claiming that he had no concept of the Ents seems incorrect. I would have stripped it out, but added a fact tag instead. Does anybody have a reference to the contrary? If not, the claim should be removed. --Bwagstaff (talk) 22:52, 15 January 2008 (UTC)

I've removed it. --159.153.4.80 (talk) 20:22, 18 January 2008 (UTC)

Bregalad--etymology[edit]

'Galad' actually means 'light' or 'radiance', as in Gil-galad. 'Galadh' is 'tree', like in 'Galadhrim'(tree-folk) and 'galadhremmin'(tree-woven[netted]) Elenlote (talk) 00:10, 18 January 2008 (UTC)

Needs a Link[edit]

Under "Entyomology": "...See Jotun". Needs a link to a Wikipedia article.

Basesurge (talk) 09:19, 25 March 2008 (UTC)

I've removed this fragment. Jötunn is already linked in the previous sentence. F.D. Rizo (talk) 15:47, 15 April 2008 (UTC)


Green man and ents[edit]

Was the concept/idea of the green man a component in the development of the ents? Jackiespeel (talk) 15:28, 1 August 2008 (UTC)

Controversy?[edit]

I've removed the Controversy section added by 71.205.245.18 (talk). Beyond mere disagreement over artistic realization, there is no evidence given for controversy -- and it certainly doesn't rival Balrogs' wings. A simple sentence in the Description section would suffice. The removed material also is not very well written and indulges in OR. If this is truly controversial, and if sources can be provided, the issue might warrant a separate section. Elphion (talk) 21:08, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

Sindarin vocabulary[edit]

Regarding this edit, I prefer my version as direct, accurate, grammatically sound, and giving originally published sources rather than fan links. Elphion (talk) 14:41, 16 January 2009 (UTC)

Pictures[edit]

Here are a couple of pictures I took of a guy costumed as an Ent at Scarborough Faire (2009). I'm not sure if they would be appropriate to add to the article, so I'll leave that judgment up to others. — Loadmaster (talk) 23:35, 30 August 2009 (UTC)


MacBeth[edit]

In the paragraph "The Last March of the Ents", there is a reference to MacBeth. "MacBeth" can mean a large number of things and the article does not explain which MacBeth Tolkien talked about. The word is linked, and the link leads to a play of Shakespeare. I am not at all sure this is the MacBeth the article intends to refer too. And if the article actually refers to Shakespeare's play, then please state so. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macbeth_(disambiguation)

Urbanus Secundus (talk) 15:08, 20 June 2010 (UTC)

Yes, the link to Shakespeare's play is alright, as the quotation implies. And there's no need to explain it here, because it is linked. De728631 (talk) 17:55, 20 June 2010 (UTC)

Treants[edit]

In case anyone notices in the future and cares enough to do something about it, Treant redirects to a page about one specific franchise rather than a proper discussion of the term. At least one user has some ownership issues and won't let it go without a fight or discuss the matter. Paliku (talk) 16:41, 24 January 2011 (UTC)

r/trees[edit]

There needs to be a mention of these ents. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.184.43.218 (talk) 03:25, 15 February 2012 (UTC)

The Man Whom the Trees Loved[edit]

I wonder, perhaps, if "The Man Whom the Trees Loved" by Algernon Blackwood, published in Pan's Garden in 1912 was one of, if not the, main inspiration for Tolkien's Ents and the trees they shepherd. Here's the quote in question:

'I wonder, by Jove, I wonder,' his thoughts ran on, 'whether a tree—er—in any lawful meaning of the term can be—alive. I remember some writing fellow telling me long ago that trees had once been moving things, animal organisms of some sort, that had stood so long feeding, sleeping, dreaming, or something, in the same place, that they had lost the power to get away. . . !'

Published at such a time that Tolkien may well have read it, this may have contributed to the development of Ents (which I think is lacking from the article), but I don't know if there's a source which supports this theory. --xensyriaT 13:54, 26 September 2012 (UTC)

I've always thought that the inspiration with MacBeth and the Tolkien's inspiration see here GimliDotNet (Speak to me,Stuff I've done) 14:15, 26 September 2012 (UTC)
Thanks for the link (I'll put the comment up there as well). I can't help feeling that Tolkien must have had many different sources of inspiration for the Ents, though perhaps it would be better to use both of examples of "sentient trees" (and Shakespeare's MacBeth scene as a contributor to the tradition). --xensyriaT 15:55, 26 September 2012 (UTC)

Thinks he is the oldest creature.[edit]

Treebeard thinks he is the oldest living thing but according to the text Tom Bombadil predates Treebeard. Technically Gandalf and Saruman also ought to be older than Treebeard. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.102.199.118 (talk) 05:36, 12 April 2013 (UTC)

Gandalf, Saruman and Bombadil are not 'creatures' GimliDotNet (Speak to me,Stuff I've done) 06:25, 12 April 2013 (UTC)

Popular culture section[edit]

The In popular culture section is pretty big, do any of these entries pass WP:IPCV ? Regardless of being cited, just because a claim can be referenced does not make it notable. - FlightTime (open channel) 23:17, 9 November 2017 (UTC)