Talk:Eurasian collared dove

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Untitled[edit]

Source for history in U.S.: [1]. For northern European range, lots of Web sites. For call, Sibley and personal experience. --JerryFriedman 23:23, 27 Jul 2004 (UTC)

  • Wow! This dove is more beautiful than the ordinairy dove! Stanton BG 19:05, 1 May 2006 (UTC)

Name "decaocto"[edit]

I recall reading that this received the name "decaocto" (18) in the 19th century not because of its call, but because at the time it was seen as so devoid of interesting characteristics that it was named simply by virtue of being registered as 18th on a list of similar birds (Streptopelia ?). I don't have any details - can this be verified ? If so, it may be worth stating, given the bird's subsequent highly unusual spread and ubiquity (a pair in my garden now ...). Ghmyrtle 12:17, 7 February 2007 (UTC)

  • I think you are right, according to "Wember, Viktor (2005): Die Namen der Vögel Europas. Bedeutung der deutschen und wissenschaftlichen Namen" http://www.ornithologie-hamburg.de/html/namendervoegeleuropas.htm (unfortunately in German) "decaocto" was used, because it was the 18th described form of Streptopelia. I do not know about the other theory, though, but I guess you might change the entry, if you want to. Karmesinkoenig 19:55, 23 April 2007 (UTC)

I have been unable to edit the first section of this topic's text, but I do take issue with the statement that the Collared dove is "small". It is abundant where I live and I have captured several specimens for brief study and release, and have incidentally captured mourning doves as well, which were also released. The collared doves are respectably larger than mourning doves, in some cases being almost twice the measured weight of adult mourning doves. An adult Collared dove is larger than virtually any songbird of North America, comparable in size to large blackbirds but smaller than crows. Large specimens are nearly the size of smaller common pigeons. (Based on personal observations and direct comparisons.) As an aside, the Collared doves take well to gentle handling. They can make excellent pets which are rapidly tamed even if caught wild. They are gentle, non-aggressive, and quiet. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Cmjohnson65 (talkcontribs) 03:03, 19 August 2008 (UTC)

A sparrow of this size would be a large sparrow: a goose of this size would be a small goose; a dove of this size is a small dove, viz it is small compared to most other doves. Kevin McE (talk) 10:58, 23 August 2008 (UTC)
German is my native language, but the link above doesn't work anymore.
However, listen to the recording of the call: it's 3 x 6... How anyone can claim it sounds similar to decaocto is beyond me.
David Marjanović (talk) 10:38, 23 June 2016 (UTC)

The scream of the dove[edit]

We have a couple of these guys visiting our garden occasionally and I hear them 'scream' often. It sounds a bit like; 'Wheuuuh' and is often repeated two to four times, emitted when the birds fly away scaredly. Why is it that this, in my opinion, best animal sound ever is almost never mentioned anywhere on the internet? I'd love to get it as a MP3 too... best sound ever.

Uh, I see it gets a small mention on here but it deserves more. 'K.

Ribbedebie (talk) 19:15, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

A sound please!

Shouldn't it be considered native not naturalised?[edit]

Since it migrated across Europe and Central Asia itself, shouldn't it be considered native in the areas not naturalised? Naturalised suggests it was introduced by man to me. It being new to these areas doesn't seem to make any difference really as it spread itself so i think naturalised is the wrong word to use. Maybe if was put something like "and has colonised most of Europe and much of Central Asia within the last century", this would be more suited? Kentynet (talk) 09:15, 28 March 2017 (UTC)

Kentynet, I rephrased, you are correct Jimfbleak - talk to me? 12:06, 28 March 2017 (UTC)