Talk:Extinction event

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Possibly major ME[edit]

Only a few million years before the Great Dying (Permian mass extinction), there appears to have been another major ME: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/04/23/scientists-discover-new-mass-extinction-rivaling-the-death-of-the-dinosaurs/?wpisrc=nl_mix&wpmm=1 , http://news.sciencemag.org/earth/2015/04/sixth-extinction-rivaling-dinosaurs-should-join-big-five-scientists-say . Kdammers (talk) 20:05, 23 April 2015 (UTC)

This is the Emeishan large igneous province (also known as the Permian Emeishan Large Igneous Province), tentatively associated with the end-Guadalupian extinction ~260 mya (see Mount Emei). Zyxwv99 (talk) 23:19, 8 July 2015 (UTC)

Which mass extinction is the "most recent"?[edit]

The lead section describes the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction as the most recent extinction, although the Holocene extinction is still ongoing. Would it be more accurate to describe the Holocene extinction as the most recent extinction event? Jarble (talk) 19:39, 6 May 2015 (UTC)

"Huge" reverts, etc.[edit]

I would like @Oiyarbepsy: to justify the content they restored on an item-by-item basis. They added >6,000 to the article, but I don't see anything like that in any of my reverts. I believe they are talking about another user? Note that "because it had nothing to do with the edit summary" is not a sufficient justification...but first I want to be certain they're even referring to the right edit. Geogene (talk) 18:26, 10 July 2015 (UTC)

Nevermind, I see they left an explanation on someone else's page, so my edits weren't involved. Geogene (talk) 18:44, 10 July 2015 (UTC)
Sorry, Geogene, I got the revisions made up. I went to your revision, and mistakenly thought you made the change I reverted. Oiyarbepsy (talk) 22:14, 10 July 2015 (UTC)

"Anthropogenic extinctions [...] between 100,000 and 200,000 years ago [...] certainly coincides with megafaunal extinction in [...] New Zealand"[edit]

So there's this excerpt right in the abstract: "Some have suggested that anthropogenic extinctions may have begun as early as when the first modern humans spread out of Africa between 100,000 and 200,000 years ago, which certainly coincides with megafaunal extinction in Australia, New Zealand and Madagascar".

Can you please explain this relating to New Zealand, which wasn't populated by humans until some hundred years ago? See History of New Zealand and Fauna of New Zealand. Thank you! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 47.72.254.62 (talk) 10:26, 21 January 2016 (UTC)

To avoid confusion, this text comes from Holocene extinction, rather than this article. The source cited (The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History) doesn't quite say that, it says that the timing of megafaunal extinction in the three places matches the first arrival of humans there. This discussion would be better at Talk:Holocene extinction I think. Mikenorton (talk) 11:04, 21 January 2016 (UTC)

Holocene extinction[edit]

I am not saying that I don't recognize climate change, but the fact that many scientists say that humans are only a part of the Holocene Extinction Event probably means that there should be more than just humans in the factors section. Gug01 (talk) 23:33, 29 January 2016 (UTC)