Talk:Figurehead

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This term is used in religion too. E.g. in David V. Barrett's book The New Believers chapter After the Prophet Dies page 61 "The School of Economic Science, in a way, has had three figureheads: Andrew Maclaren (1975) ... []" It is often very difficult for an outsider to assess who has real power in a religious organization. Can we move this article to figurehead (metaphor)? Andries 21:06, 27 January 2006 (UTC)

  • I disagree. The idea of a "figurehead" is a fundamentally political concept. It is a statement about the appearance and reality of political power in the broad sense, and as such applies equally well to national governments as to your local rotary club. Anyway, "figurehead (metaphor)" is just meaningless if you don't know what it is already.--Pharos 09:00, 10 March 2006 (UTC)

see also frontman Marrtel 20:01, 2 June 2006 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

  • Figurehead (metaphor)Figurehead —(Discuss)— This is by far the most common use of the word 'figurehead' today. Additionally, the article about the metaphor could be expanded considerably. —16:33, 24 April 2008 (UTC)

Figurehead is a carved figure on the bow of a ship.A person who holds a highposition but has no real power. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.234.119.18 (talk) 17:18, 15 November 2009 (UTC)