Talk:Fish River Canyon

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this page looks more like some dudes travel showcase than an actual encyclopaedia article.

WP:Be bold ;) But you are absolutely right. --Pgallert (talk) 12:33, 1 February 2010 (UTC)

I've started work on the Fish River Canyon Hiking trail with the view of moving it to a page of its own. Articles found at pages such as List_of_long-distance_footpaths, List_of_long-distance_hiking_tracks_in_Australia and Hiking_trails were used to format the article. The Ultra Marathon section was put together in line with the Comrades Marathon and the Two Oceans Marathon. Only the short "Activities" section changed and I added what was needed to cover hiking in the canyon. The material was selected with the trail runner in mind too. The rest of the article is in dire need of expanding and in due time, once the Hiking Trail section has settled, I will attempt to add to the other sections. References and papers are very scares to find though. -- RudiBosbouer (talk) 09:17, 16 September 2012 (UTC)

Second largest Canyon[edit]

@Michaelandsandy: For contentious reasons I'm happy with your removal of the "second largest canyon" attribute, but your reasoning is not necessarily correct. To substantiate, many geologists feel than the Yarlung Tsangpo Grand Canyon or Yarlung Zangbo Grand Canyon is not a canyon at all but rather a very deep incised valley. The same can be said of Colca Canyon in South America. The issue lies in the definition of Valley, Canyon, Gorge and Ravine. Both Zangbo and Colca do not have the near vertical sides which is characteristic of the Grand and Fish River Canyons.

Here are some definitions and explanations:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ravine a small narrow steep-sided valley that is larger than a gully and smaller than a canyon and that is usually worn by running water

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gorge a narrow passage through land; especially : a narrow steep-walled canyon or part of a canyon

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/canyon a deep narrow valley with steep sides and often with a stream flowing through it and Very narrow, deep valley cut by a river through resistant rock and having steep, almost vertical sides. Canyons occur most often in arid or semiarid regions. Some canyons (e.g., the Grand Canyon) are spectacular natural features.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/valley a : an elongate depression of the earth's surface usually between ranges of hills or mountains b : an area drained by a river and its tributaries

Also, searching for "difference-between-canyon-gorge" we get from eHow: Canyons and gorges refer to the same basic landforms. A canyon or gorge is a deep, narrow valley with steep, rocky sides. "Narrow" as used to describe these formations is relative to the length of the valley. Some canyons are several miles wide. The only technical difference between a canyon and a gorge is linguistic. "Canyon" comes from Spanish, while "gorge" is a French word. From a geological standpoint, the two are exactly the same.

I asked a notable geologist's opinion and he replied: "To me a true canyon is deep fluvial erosion feature associated with an uplifted (near) peneplain surface (plateau land) and essentially is initially formed in thick, near horizontal sedimentary strata. When the horizontal strata erodes it gives rise to a very broad, stepped erosional feature, narrowing at depth until the harder basement rocks are reached.....ie the Grand & Fish River canyons. Erosion in metamorphic and igneous rocks would give rise to a ravine or gorge. It's "horses for courses" and one can argue till blue in the face"

RudiBosbouer (talk) 11:55, 17 July 2014 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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