Talk:Flemish Sign Language

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Rewrite[edit]

Federalization[edit]

I'm not very happy with how it currently reads, and I will paste the original text here as a reference. If anyone else would like to attempt rewriting it, please feel free. -- {Zaf} 07:26, 13 November 2005 (UTC)

'Original Text'
Another important aspect influencing sign language in Flanders is the federalization process which has taken place in Belgium during the last two or three decades. Today every Belgian belongs to a certain linguistic group and the same goes for Deaf people of course. Ironically they are also considered Flemish or Walloon, i.e. they are regarded as being part of the linguistic majority groups of speakers of Dutch or French regardless of the sign language they use and the linguistic minority group to which they belong. The federalization was a fact in 1993, but this was of course the result of a long process. The national Deaf federation, NAVEKADOS, already split up into a Flemish and a Walloon federation in the seventies: Fevlado (Federatie van Vlaamse Dovenorganisaties or the Association of Flemish Deaf Organizations) was founded in 1977. As a result, cultural activities have been organized separately since the seventies, the Flemish and the Walloon Deaf clubs have been subsidized from different sources, etc. Contacts between Flemish and Walloon Deaf people have become less and less frequent and this has of course had its effect on the development of the sign languages in both communities which seem to be deviating from each other as they are going through separate standardization processes. Therefore, the name for the sign language has changed over time from “Belgian Sign Language” over “Flemish Belgian Sign Language” to the now preferred “Flemish Sign Language”.


History[edit]

When did the practice of oral education of deaf children over using sign end? -- {Zaf} 02:25, 16 November 2005 (UTC)