Talk:Franz Kafka

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Along thematic characteristics, stylistic characteristics merit to be in the lede, too[edit]

This (reverted) edit was made with the intention to give Wikipedia readers of the article also some info on (modernist) Formal/Stylistic characteristics of Kafka's work. Please discuss. --DancingPhilosopher (talk) 13:05, 3 July 2013 (UTC)

It's in the source and frankly interesting that he influenced science fiction writers, but I'd suggest moving to the "Literary influence" section. I'd also suggest that it's okay to wait a day until the activity on the page calms a little. Let's see what the primary contributors think. Victoria (talk) 13:15, 3 July 2013 (UTC)
I never track changes to a TFA while it's on the main page. Best to wait til it's over to decide what to keep permanently. PumpkinSky talk 19:12, 3 July 2013 (UTC)
If Gerda agrees, I can agree to putting that back in, but it shouldn't need the refs because the lead should be a summary of the article and what we add to the lead should be in the body. If need be we can add a bit to the body, with refs. Let's see what Gerda says.PumpkinSky talk 02:46, 4 July 2013 (UTC)
I think that the lead should first introduce basics to someone who doesn't even know that Kafka is a writer. The post seems too specialized too soon. Please word here what you would like to be part of the article body, with the sources. Let's discuss that, then insert, then see how to perhaps summarize it in the lead. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:12, 4 July 2013 (UTC)
Inasmuch as Metamorphosis is widely taught in high schools in the United States, The Hunger Artist is widely anthologized, The Castle and The Trial are frequent readings in advanced literature courses, and Kafka himself is an essential entry in the history of 20th Century literature, and a seminal figure in various literary genres, including existentialist and surrealist literature, the lead is adequate, although some tweaking may be helpful—isn't it usually?Euonyman (talk) 23:06, 3 October 2013 (UTC)
Hmm. I can see Gerda's point. We can work this out. Leads should be a summary for sure. PumpkinSky talk 12:15, 4 July 2013 (UTC)

Wow. What a lot of minutia B.S. about one guy. They left out what color pajamas he wore. Maybe what they say about the Wikipedia bent is true. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.1.100.148 (talk) 17:26, 2 November 2013 (UTC)

Kafka reference in Breaking Bad episode Kafkaesque[edit]

Here is one sourse that Kafka is DIRECTLY referenced by Breaking Bad, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/09/literary-references-breaking-bad-_n_3731502.html#slide=2786642

Also the episode is titled Kafkaesque http://www.amctv.com/shows/breaking-bad/episodes/season-3/kafkaesque

The direct reference is at a group therapy meeting, Jesse describes his new workplace as a boring corporate laundromat he complains about his boss, that he's not worthy to meet the owner whom everyone fears. "Sounds kind of Kafkaesque," responds the group leader. This does fall into the section cultural legacy and the List The following are examples of works across a range of literary, musical, and dramatic genres which demonstrate the extent of cultural influence: and so should be included in the list.

Although I do not understand how to site sources in Wikipedia because I am not a computer wiz(I can site sources in papers and such using MLA/APA styles)I do believe that this reference to Kafka should be included since it was done in a MAJOR television series, and many people after seeing this show (including myself) who had never heard of him until it's reference. Like wise I believe that should a page be developed discussing Kafka it should direct here also — Preceding unsigned comment added by Cr8meone (talkcontribs) 23:59, 10 October 2013 (UTC)

Use in Foreign Language Learning[edit]

From my experience and the experience of many other people I've known, Kafka's writings are often used in the earlier years of German as a foreign language instruction. This is done presumably because Kafka often tells very interesting stories with fairly simple language and is therefore one of the most accessible writers in the German language. I've read what others have said in this article about his extensive use of the SOV order in subordinate clauses, but this is normal in German and something a student cannot avoid learning even in the first semester. Even his long sentences tend to have an easy natural flow. Where long sentences become difficult in German is when the subordinate clauses get so deeply nested within each other that the verbs from multiple clauses all pile up together at the end of the sentence. (BTW, even in the main clause with a compound verb, all but the inflected verb follow the SOV order.) Unfortunately I don't know where to find sources for the frequency of and reasons for the use of Kafka in the early phases of German language instruction. Maybe a German teacher can document this. Bostoner (talk) 21:18, 30 October 2013 (UTC)

Good point. When I was studying German literature, I did not find Kafka particularly hard to read. I did find him subtle, a facet of his style that is almost lost in the older translations. It's not always because it is broken down in English to successions of simple declarative sentences but because those sentences are often blocky and humorless. Personally, I found some of Robert Musil more baffling but not on account of style. At times, it was difficult to see what he was getting at. Luckily I had a teacher who made us talk about what we were reading as literature, not simply studies in German. Some modern works, such as Max Frisch's Homo Faber, are perfectly straightforward whether you read them in the original or in translation. It's "adult" subject matter, however, that might not go over in some programs. That was another benefit of my teacher. She was not squeamish. You see, in this country we find it okay to imagine a person transforming into an inhuman monster reviled by his own family but we balk at portraying an affair between a man and his daughter, even when they are both unaware of their connection.Euonyman (talk) 19:34, 11 January 2014 (UTC)

Introduction[edit]

I'm not an expert in Kafka, but I suggest someone edit the intro to this article. First, there is no mention of humor in Kafka's texts in the intro, and I believe there is already a lot about it written. I remenber reading that Kafka read this work aloud for friends in cafes and they all had a lot of fun. Of course, many people fail to see this exactly because of the stress in the dark gloomy aspect of his work. Definying a Czech Jew as a German speaking person is kind of funny. Am I an English speaking scholar because my thesis is in English? I don't think so. Kafka was a Czech Jew. Also, it seems to me that the interpretation of the identity issue is kind of funny. I remember reading that Jews had a strong Czechoslovakian identity (that country emerged after the 1st war). The comment on identity should be backed, presented with other views, or simply taken from the text. Actually, I just thought that the two things are connected. Identity and humor. --HeloPait (talk) 13:55, 22 January 2014 (UTC)

I can't help that he spoke and wrote in German, and he was Czech only from 1918 to his death, became Czech automatically when Austria-Hungary collapsed, without national identity as far as I know. - Humor, fine, how would you word it? With a source please? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 17:59, 22 January 2014 (UTC)