Talk:Franz Kafka

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Bohemian Jews and Czech Jews[edit]

I would like to invite editors to express their opinions about Talk:Czechs#Bohemian Jews and Czech Jews.--Der Golem (talk) 09:47, 21 May 2014 (UTC)


Removed Clause on Difficulty[edit]

I removed the clause:

Kafka did not write in standard High German, but rather in a Praguean German heavily influenced by the Yiddish and Czech languages, making it even more difficult to translate his works.[1]

Simply because I've found so much evidence to the contrary both on this discussion page, Banville's Article, Neugroschel's discussion of the difficulty of translating Kafka (who happens to speak Yiddish and Prague German), and numerous other places including a conversation with a German speaker. Deleuze and Guattari do not make any citations of their claim, and neither speak German as a first language. If anyone wishes to challenge me on this, I'd be more than happy to discuss it further. At the moment, it appears Guattari and Deleuze were very mistaken when making this claim.Artimaean (talk) 21:11, 2 June 2014 (UTC)

Thank you, that makes sense, --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:07, 3 June 2014 (UTC)
as a native speaker of german i can assure you that kafka's original writings are in normal standard German 12:57, 6 October 2014 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 149.172.96.95 (talk)

Please add ESSENTIAL KAFKA[edit]

{{request edit}}

>> please add Essential Kafka, Rendezvous with Otherness - Authorhouse 2011, 9 Stories & 3 novel excerpts, translated by Phillip Lundberg to the bibliography. You might also see fit to add it to the Translation section (recent-"Critical") as I used the latest German edition to do my translation, thanks! ISBN 978-1-4389-9021-7 <<<<

I very much appreciate your attention to this matter. You may email me at philliplundberg@earthlink.net << should you have any ?s or are nice enough to inform me that you have taken care of the matter.

Thanks, P.L.

Thank you, I added it a while ago. - I reverted your last edit because the fact is mentioned before, and the article is already very long. Thank you for contributions. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:35, 21 July 2014 (UTC)

Dear Gerda - Thank you for adding Essential Kafka - however there is at least 1 mistake, maybe 2. I have no idea where the names "Deleuze and Gerattari" came from, the publisher is Authorhouse, 2011; also I would prefer the listing to come in the "Bibliography" section (not "Further Reading") - which brings up the ? as to whether it should be under "Lundberg, Phillip" OR "Kafka, Franz" - as that seems to be where the translations have been put. I might note that it's rather a mess, mixing things up & perhaps it would be best to have a "Translations" section separate from the other sections where the various translations are listed with the respective translators being the key.... Of course, now we would be talking about some extensive editing work and perhaps it would be simplest just to move my translation out of "Further Reading" and into the "Bibliography" section - ?? Your call, these computers are way to complicated for my tastes...

Thanks Again!! - phillip. Phillip (talk) 16:10, 25 July 2014 (UTC)

Thank you, will fix the publisher, but can't get it to the bibliography section unless it's a reference. What do think of adding it to Franz Kafka works? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 20:55, 25 July 2014 (UTC)

Sure, you could certainly put it there too - I'm sorry that I've been negligent on checking the status of this talk item. I'll try to do better though this may well wrap up the issue as best as possible. Again, Thank you for your help ... if you're interested in my translation there is a free download of Josephine, etc. from my website which is ez to find, just google my name - a link should be obvious in the 1st five choices to Tallyho!

yours, pl. Phillip (talk) 22:03, 12 September 2014 (UTC)

Translation difficulties exaggerated, not unusual, irrelevant, let's delete[edit]

Absurd. When is translation easy? Whenever one has to deal with colloquialisms, or with poetry of any sort, when the meaning of words is vague or multifaceted, there's difficulty. We're here describing most of the world's literature. That's a universal translation problem, not something unique to "translating Kafka into English." Want something you can translate universally? I give you Euclid's "Elements."

As for the other specific "difficulty" mentioned here, the sentence construction with the verb at the end, there are at least two problems with this complaint. One is that, were it true, it wouldn't matter, because understanding a text isn't a matter of the psychological impact of your first reading of a sentence. As in, "oh, THAT's the verb, how that changes the experience of the story!" It might be true for inexperienced readers, middle schoolers for example, and it's certainly a problem with comedy because it messes up the timing, but that's it. The second problem (see my use of the subjunctive, above) is that it's not true. English is flexible enough for the verb to come at the end. See Shakespeare for a thousand examples. Yes, in the hands of most translators it will sound awkward, but that just means you need a better translation or a more intelligent reader. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 205.232.191.16 (talkcontribs) November 18, 2014

  1. ^ Deleuze & Guattari 1986, pp. 22–25.