Talk:Free induction decay

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usage in other fields than NMR[edit]

The term free induction decay come up in other fields such as raman spectroscopy and particularly FTICR. I am not certain as to the correctness of these usages. In FTICR it does refer to a dephasing process but not related to magnetic induction. Any input?--Nick Y. 18:55, 27 October 2006 (UTC)


I agree, NMR spectroscopy is so yesterday. Today we care about time-domain electronic spectroscopy.128.223.23.171 (talk) 18:41, 15 April 2009 (UTC)


Whether or not NMR is "so yesterday" it is still a technique that is widely used and FID is an integral part. 1/6/09 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.130.37.13 (talk) 00:35, 1 June 2009 (UTC)

Rewrite[edit]

Rewritten as existing content was a little confused. Ultimately there isn't much more to be usefully said and this page would be better merged into a new article on FT NMR.

84.92.241.186 18:26, 27 April 2007 (UTC)

Larmor Precession[edit]

Is not FID exactly the same as Larmor precession, in which case should not the articles be integrated, with redirection? GilesW 10:13, 22 September 2007 (UTC)

Not really, FID generally refers to the NMR signal rather than Larmor precession. While the nuclear spin magnetisation is undergoing Larmor precession while the NMR signal is acquired, relaxation processes are responsible for the 'decay' part of FID. It is helpful to keep the experimental observable distinct from the underlying physical phenomena. The article is stubby, but would fit in better to a proper article on FT NMR. Pdch 13:50, 28 October 2007 (UTC)