Talk:Gasoline

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Vapor Lock[edit]

The techniques and technologies described for preventing evaporative emissions and vapor lock in automobiles are terribly obsolete. The conversion to electronic fuel injection and pressurized fuel-rail delivery was largely complete more than 20 years ago and vehicles without fuel injection are now reasonably considered antique. The paragraph needs a total rewrite to be current. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Drcampbell (talkcontribs) 16:50, 2 October 2012

American Bias[edit]

It is incredible that there are people justifying the use of "gasoline" based on google searches. It cannot be refuted that "Petrol" is used by many, many more people around the world than gasoline. Hiding behind some BE v. AE rules of Wikipedia is cowardice and the Gasoline page ought to be called Petrol. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Uday911 (talkcontribs) 21:01, 25 July 2015‎

Those are the rules. Like it or lump it. Or you could try to get them changed. You won't succeed, of course, and a good thing too.
As for your factual claim about the number of users, can you prove that? Are you aware that Americans make up roughly 2/3 of the world's native English speakers (and when you add in Canada it's even higher)? Of course that's just first-language speakers; when you throw in second-language speakers the picture is more muddled, but how often are they saying "petrol/gasoline" versus whatever it's called in their own language? --Trovatore (talk) 21:21, 25 July 2015 (UTC)
Say, what do you mean by "people are justifying it based on Google searches"? Google Trends says that petrol is a considerably more popular term than gasoline: https://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=gasoline%2C%20petrol. 167.220.196.143 (talk) 16:54, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Due to the American origin of Wikipedia, of course most articles have been started using American aberrational terms. This isn't a good reason to keep articles under names which are only used by a small minority of the English-speaking world, regardless of their over-representation on the internet. English is an international language, with indigenous and second-language speakers all over the world. One group cannot dictate its unusual terms for universal objects and concepts based on the petty rule of "I called it first".

--151.225.64.63 (talk) 10:42, 31 March 2015 (UTC) (A first-language English speaker)

Sounds good to me. But I sure am glad that I don't go around hoovering things that could just as easily be vacuumed with an Electrolux, Eureka, Bissel, a Kirby, or a Shop Vac. I would feel a bit foolish if I did!! And it sure makes me feel better to use I put a percent sign on a percentage instead of "pc" abutted to the numeral. I like to saw logs! (talk) 06:23, 26 July 2015 (UTC)
No, it should be at gasoline, because nearly all English-speaking people, regardless of where they are, understand what "gasoline" is. No English speaker from the USA who hasn't been exposed to a lot of Commonwealth English knows what "petrol" is. It's the same reason why the page for a large cargo transport vehicle is at "truck" instead of "lorry," and why the page for the season that comes after summer is at "autumn" rather than "fall." If there are two competing words for the same thing, use the one that's understood by everyone. Most Americans don't know what petrol and lorries are, and English-speaking people outside the Americas haven't called autumn "fall" since the 17th century. Jsc1973 (talk) 04:01, 8 August 2015 (UTC)
Gasoline origins is a brand of petrol. It is like calling all pens Bics. Stop it. It is Petrol. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 118.211.201.51 (talk) 12:58, 10 October 2015 (UTC)
So it's a genericized brand name. Wikipedia has an article about Aspirin too, but that used to be a brand name of the Bayer corporation. Does that justify moving that article to Acetylsalicylic acid instead? ihatefile007 (talk) 20:35, 14 November 2015 (UTC)

They are both trade names no longer in use. Petroleum Spirit (English, Iraqi Petroleum Co?) and Gasoline (US, Getty Oil?). White spirit was an early generic name, before its use in cars. Benzene was a common term for it before tetra ethyl lead.27.33.81.78 (talk) 01:49, 9 February 2016 (UTC)

If nobody outside the US calls it "gasoline" then it's silly to call the page "gasoline". HTH. - 124.168.79.42 (talk) 05:14, 15 February 2016 (UTC)

It's not true that nobody outside the US calls it gasoline. -- Ed (Edgar181) 12:37, 15 February 2016 (UTC)
BTDT. Please all exhaust yourselves arguing about this. When fully exhausted, read Talk:Gasoline/Archive_2#Article_name. Thanks, Mathglot (talk) 09:51, 2 July 2016 (UTC)

translucent?[edit]

The opening sentence, as of today, describes gasoline as a "translucent, petroleum-derived liquid".

Now, it's true that taken literally, translucent just means that it allows light through, which is true. But it usually also suggests that it's not transparent, because otherwise, why wouldn't you just say transparent?

I'm going to change it to "transparent". A better word might be "clear", except some people take clear to imply colorless (they shouldn't, really, but sometimes they do). --Trovatore (talk) 06:01, 10 September 2015 (UTC)

Undyed, the liquid is clear.27.33.81.78 (talk) 01:54, 9 February 2016 (UTC)

Picture of gasoline[edit]

Should we add a picture of actual Gasoline to the article? For example:

gasoline in a jar

andrybak (talk) 22:58, 29 February 2016 (UTC)

If you in the archives, you can see that there was a bit of a fuss over this picture. It was actually in the article for a long time.
But some editors were concerned that it wasn't a safe way of handling gasoline, and started adding distracting disclaimers to the caption. I thought that was frankly a little silly, but I guess I can understand how a certain sort of cautious mind would be concerned. Anyway I thought the picture didn't add enough to the article to be worth the disclaimers. It doesn't look that different from, say, water, in the same jar. So I just removed the picture to cut the Gordian knot.
I agree that it would be nice to find a picture of actual gasoline, ideally one that doesn't trigger this reaction from sensitive editors. My ideal picture would be something like a worker taking a sample from a large tank, where you can see the color of the gasoline through the glass of the graduated cylinder or something. I don't know where to find it, though. --Trovatore (talk) 23:07, 29 February 2016 (UTC)

Autogas[edit]

Hi. The following is contradictory and I have taken it out of the article until it can be clarified.

The first sentence says that autogas refers to gasoline, while the next sentence says it refers to LPG. Which is it?

"The terms "mogas", short for motor gasoline, or "autogas", short for automobile gasoline, are used to distinguish automobile fuel from aviation fuel, or "avgas".[1][2][3]

When used with reference to cars, Autogas refers to LPG."

  1. ^ Federal Aviation Administration (5 April 2000). "Revised Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) Number CE-00-19R1". Archived from the original on 12 October 2006. Retrieved 28 October 2006. The FAA highly recommends installing placards stating the use of 82UL is or is not approved on those airplanes that specify unleaded autogas as an approved fuel. 
  2. ^ Pew, Glenn (November 2007). "Avgas: Group Asks EPA To Get The Lead Out". Retrieved 18 February 2008. 
  3. ^ [1], Mogas, Alcohol Blend, Octane, Aviation Fuels and Specifications