Talk:Gate valve

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Some of the photos in the article are globe valves and not gate valves. there is a significant difference between the two. I removed the incorrect images. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 184.71.31.149 (talk) 21:05, 14 January 2013 (UTC)

No, they're just small UK-style gate valves for domestic heating. The widened sides to the body are distinctive for a gate valve, as is the large diameter to the top cap.
Mind you, they don't add anything to the article, so I'd agree to their removal. Andy Dingley (talk) 22:08, 14 January 2013 (UTC)


There is a gallery, but all that can be seen are the outside of the valve bodies, so the insides could be anything, and ultimately they are not very elucidating. -Craig Pemberton 08:04, 20 November 2009 (UTC)

which is better for flow control gate valve or butterfly valve

as far as i know, gate valve is mainly for either full flow or no flow. so i guess if for flow rate control, butterfly valve is better.


Gate valves are on-off valves. Butterfly valves can be used as either on=off or as throttling valves. A certain amount of flow turbulence will occur when butterfly valves are used for throttling due to their in-line design.


"Better" is a relative term. While gate valves are typically "on-off" valves, some types may be used to throttle, and depending upon the application, could be better than a butterfly valve in that particular application. Best to seek prefessional advice.


One category of a "gate" valve is a "knife" type gate valve, and these come in a couple of general configurations; Double-edge seat and "wedge" types.

The file http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Valve-nuts-bolts-The-Alloy-Valve-Stockist.jpg seems to depict Ball Valve stems. Should this be removed from this particular gallery? Jdedmond (talk) 09:46, 13 May 2010 (UTC)

Poor sealing[edit]

Gate valves, when used with a fluid that contains any amount of sediment, are prone to sediment build-up in the seat area, with resultant poor sealing. For this reason they are a poor choice for "shutoff valves" in, eg, domestic water systems. drh (talk) 11:32, 29 July 2010 (UTC)

ANSI[edit]

ASNI is a American National Standards Institute is institute that devide gate valves in different classes. it's better to explane about this classes in the main article. "gate valve are intended to be fully open or completely closed". this is very important sentence that make gate valve special. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Saeed mirzazadeh (talkcontribs) 07:36, 2 July 2011 (UTC)

A Commons file used on this page has been nominated for deletion[edit]

The following Wikimedia Commons file used on this page has been nominated for deletion:

Participate in the deletion discussion at the nomination page. —Community Tech bot (talk) 02:22, 24 September 2018 (UTC)