Talk:Giant impact hypothesis

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The Apollo rocks[edit]

In Section 4 of this article, it says "the team found that the Apollo rocks carried an isotopic signature that was identical with rocks from Earth". What are "Apollo rocks"? Cemkay (talk) 22:09, 8 December 2012 (UTC)

I changed it to "rocks from the Apollo program" -- Kheider (talk) 23:00, 8 December 2012 (UTC)

Possible source[edit]

Nature are running an opinion piece on this area:

http://www.nature.com/news/planetary-science-lunar-conspiracies-1.14270#/b10

©Geni (talk) 22:45, 5 December 2013 (UTC)

Update[edit]

A recent article in Science ("Impact Theory Gets Whacked", 11 Oct. 2013) has a good review, and an update. ~ J. Johnson (JJ) (talk) 23:44, 6 December 2013 (UTC)

This is the article; unfortunately, it doesn't actually explain what the alternate theory is without a subscription. This space.com article (thanks Drumhead96) may be what is being referred to, but I'm not 100% sure yet. Serendipodous 23:39, 9 December 2013 (UTC)

Theia (planet) [edit]

Theia (planet) (edit|talk|history|protect|delete|links|watch|logs|views) was recently recreated. It was previously merged into this article some years ago. -- 76.65.128.112 (talk) 06:11, 31 December 2013 (UTC)

I went ahead and merged. It's been a year since it was recreated, but it was still a stub with less info than this article has. — kwami (talk) 08:06, 31 December 2013

Possible new evidence[edit]

I found a reference to possible new evidence for a giant impact:

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-23180271

"Seismic data indicate that the western and eastern hemispheres of Earth's inner core differ, and this has led some to suggest that the core was once subjected to an impulse - presumably from the collision of a space rock or planetoid which shook the whole Earth."

I have been unable to find the "some" who are suggesting this. It is not mentioned in the scientific report the article is based on: http://www.nature.com/srep/2013/130628/srep02096/full/srep02096.html

I have emailed the author of the BBC article Professor Simon Refern of the University of Cambridge http://www.esc.cam.ac.uk/people/academic-staff/simon-redfern

in order to try to ascertain if there is any proper source to quote from.

Star A Star (talk) 04:10, 17 March 2014 (UTC)