Talk:Glass

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Picture of lead glass[edit]

Not sure this can be the case. From what I remember, PbO glass has a faint greenish colour. This is more likely sodium borosilicate glass (i.e. pyrex). User:Rvlaw 4 January, 2016

I'm not sure which photo you're referring to. If it's the welding photo, that is definitely common lead-glass used in neon-lighting construction. I have a ton of it at home. It's very clear in thin sections, but in cross-section (when I cut the tube and look down its length, it is very yellow in color (as opposed to the turquois-blue of soda-lime or the white of fused silica). Borosilicates can have a range of colors, from white BK7 to brown Pyrex. Greenish-blue tint is usually from iron. Zaereth (talk) 22:31, 7 January 2016 (UTC)

Really? What causes the colour in the flame then ? When you heat lead glass you usually get a grey-white flame from the ions in the glass. Likewise, if you heat soda glass you get a yellow flame from the Na ions, the same occurs with sodium borosilicate glass (i.e. pyrex). I don't know that much about the subject so I might be wrong. User:Rvlaw 21 September, 2016 —Preceding undated comment added 09:18, 21 September 2016 (UTC)

Couldn't tell you much about the color of the flame, except that I have some fused silica, soda-lime, and borosilicate here that I could try it on and let you know. As the person doing the welding (my sister holding the camera), I can tell you that it is definitely lead-glass, used in neon-lighting construction. I bought a whole case of feed-tubes from the local supply house for about five bucks. (Sold by weight, but roughly 1000 4' sticks to a case.) The OD is 5mm and the ID is 3mm. The flame is a carburizing flame from a simple, handheld propane-torch. (No oxy to make it neutral. Such high temps are simply not needed for lead glass.) The manufacturer of the glass tubing is Voltarc, which I purchased from Sun Supply many years ago. Zaereth (talk) 11:11, 21 September 2016 (UTC)
I tried it with other glasses and get the same yellow flame with the propane torch. I'm guessing this is from the unburned carbon, reigniting as it flows past the hot glass. Carbon has a strong spectral-line in the yellow. The lead glass can be welded at a reddish-orange heat. Soda-lime at an orangish-yellow. However, the fused-silica and borosilicate require an oxy-gas flame (preferably oxy-hydrogen), and they melt at a white-hot temp. It's impossible to see the color of the neutral flame because these glasses are so much brighter. These give off so much light it's more like greybody radiation rather than blackbody (the glass is not opaque to its own light) and require a welding helmet with a minimum shade-10 filter just to even see them. I hope that helps. Zaereth (talk) 18:12, 21 September 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Ingredients[edit]

The list in the Ingredients section is highly suspect. All the ratios information is from this source:

I'm not convinced how authoritative it is. The exact material ratios are suspicious, since a range of ingredient ratios are used (e.g. borosilicate glasses). Better references are needed for each of them. For now, I'm removing the ingredient percentage. T.Shafee(Evo&Evo)talk 08:08, 2 January 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Semi-protected edit request on 30 January 2017[edit]

Under "Silicate glass" -> Ingridients-> 3. Sodium borosiliate glass, Pyrex -> line 3: (e.g. Pyrex) -> New: (e.g. Duran, Pyrex) -> And link on Duran Under "Silicate glass" -> Ingridients-> 5. Aluminosilicate glass -> New: Link on Aluminosilicate glass --Middlesea (talk) 14:20, 30 January 2017 (UTC) Middlesea (talk) 14:20, 30 January 2017 (UTC)

X mark.svg Not done Pyrex is a the most well known example, Duran in discussed in the Borosilicate glass article. Polyamorph (talk) 16:12, 30 January 2017 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 9 February 2017[edit]

  1. Sodium borosilicate glass, Pyrex: silica + boron trioxide (B2O3) + soda (Na2O) + alumina (Al2O3). Stands heat expansion much better than window glass. Used for chemical glassware, cooking glass, car head lamps, etc. Borosilicate glasses (e.g. Duran, Pyrex) Soecor (talk) 14:33, 9 February 2017 (UTC)

Pyrex[edit]

Since Pyrex brand products are not made of borosilicate glass since before the existence of Wikipedia, it would only be appropriate to not mention as if they are. http://www.snopes.com/food/warnings/pyrex.asp — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ibmua (talkcontribs) 22:42, 19 February 2017 (UTC)

Might be true in North America, but not elsewhere. It is explained in the Pyrex article. Polyamorph (talk) 10:29, 20 February 2017 (UTC)