Talk:Glossary of motorsport terms

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Apex[edit]

So already an arguable definition! "Apex" is probably most often used to mean the clipping point, as this definition currently dscribes - but it is also sometimes used to mean the actual apex of the trajectory. -- Ian Dalziel (talk) 12:32, 18 January 2009 (UTC)

No problem, add both meanings! Royalbroil 12:45, 18 January 2009 (UTC)
I'll try to find some cites first - the whole page is in danger of being OR. -- Ian Dalziel (talk) 13:01, 18 January 2009 (UTC)

Tank-slapper[edit]

A good definition of this term would be handy. For the moment good wording is escaping me. --Falcadore (talk) 03:32, 19 January 2009 (UTC)

This help? Apterygial 03:43, 19 January 2009 (UTC)

Parade lap[edit]

I brought this up some time ago at the parade lap talk page, but forgot about it so since there's a few sets of eyes here at the moment I'll ask again. In F1 at least, the parade lap is (formally) referred to as the formation lap, and only informally by some fans as the parade lap. The official parade lap in F1 involves the drivers going around the track on the back of a float in the morning before the race. Just wanted to get an opinion on the usage in other forms of motorsport (particularly NASCAR/IRL) and if there's any objections to changing it to the proper name with perhaps a "see Formation Lap" under the parade heading. AlexJ (talk) 14:56, 19 January 2009 (UTC)

People in the U.S., like IndyCar and NASCAR fans, always call it a parade lap{s) or warmup lap(s). We need to make sure that everyone can understand the term. I don't know if there's a U.S. term for the time when a driver rides a float around the track before an event. We need to be very careful to not let this become an F1-centric or nation-centric list, even if F1 is the world championship. Another alternative is to come up with a list of F1 (or other driver's series) terms. I'm tempted to write a List of NASCAR terminology. We should be liberal about doing lots of "See ..." so that everyone can figure out the terms. Royalbroil 01:37, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
Absolutely agree on taking care to keep it suitable for all series. I'd prefer warmup lap to parade lap as the main definition of the term, as I think it's clearer in describing the purpose of it. It also appears to be used both in the US and in F1/European racing. Any objections to moving the page to "Warmup lap" and re-jigging the terms here? AlexJ (talk) 13:00, 21 January 2009 (UTC)

Suggestions[edit]

Now my focus is primarily on F1 articles, so I won't be able to contribute is a way that's comprehensive in motor-sporting perspective. But I'd still like to make suggestions as to what should be added to the list, again mostly from F1 jargon. To start off, "KERS" and "practice session". I'll try and come back to make more suggestions. LeaveSleaves 22:39, 19 January 2009 (UTC)

Practice session applies to many genres of motorsport. NASCAR has nicknamed it "Happy Hour". Royalbroil 01:37, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
Happy Hour? People are happier when they are practising? Apterygial 01:43, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
Either that or they spend time at a bar, wink! Here's a link that proves I'm sober. Royalbroil 02:21, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
I'm wondering how often your last sentence is used in other contexts on Wikipedia... Apterygial 02:23, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
I'm sure it's the first time. It's very rare to find me to be in an altered state. I'm serious. I was making a joke about the other use of the term! Royalbroil 02:34, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
Oh, I believe you, but it did make me wonder for a moment what the link was. Apterygial 04:51, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
Sector (as in the timing segments of a lap) could do with being added. AlexJ (talk) 13:03, 21 January 2009 (UTC)

I think that steward would be a good idea, and possibly Clerk of the Course and Race Director (if the latter isn't F1-specific).--Diniz(talk) 14:17, 23 January 2009 (UTC)

and Race Director (if the latter isn't F1-specific). It isn't. [1] --Falcadore (talk) 06:17, 25 January 2009 (UTC)
Definitely add race director. I've heard it here in the U.S. at the Indy 500 (at a minimum). I think that NASCAR uses the term too. Royalbroil 13:44, 25 January 2009 (UTC)

Clear definitions[edit]

Hey, good idea this page. Well done on getting it started. However, there isn't much point in defining specialist terminology in terms of more specialist terminology. You need to guard against this . If you describe "shutting the door" as being when a driver "takes an early apex" that needs you then to explain the term "takes an early apex". Try keeping definitions simple and in plain English. Otherwise, keep up the good work, and don't forget to cite your definitions... otherwise this is OR. Pyrope 15:33, 20 January 2009 (UTC)

English[edit]

This page is taking shape pretty well! One thing I've noticed is that we have a bit of a mix of US / British English. We should probably try to stick to one or the other for consistency, and it should obviously be British English. Hahaha, no, I'm kidding... personally I have no real preference either way and hopefully we can sort it out easily enough :o) Bretonbanquet (talk) 16:00, 20 January 2009 (UTC)

Is there a consistency throughout motorsport articles? I think that should be followed if there is. Schumi555 (talk) 16:03, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
No, there isn't really. US-centric articles use US English and Euro-centric articles tend to use British English. This article spans both... Bretonbanquet (talk) 16:11, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
I would have thought Kazakhstani-English would have been the go, but what do I know... --Falcadore (talk) 18:02, 20 January 2009 (UTC)
I must have missed something there... Bretonbanquet (talk) 19:41, 20 January 2009 (UTC)

I started it with US English, writing about "tires". It probably doesn't really matter, but I'm happy to swallow my pride do as the Americans do. Apterygial 23:57, 20 January 2009 (UTC)

I have a suggestion: If a term is mainly used in a specific country, then it should use that nation's spelling/terminology. I don't know what to say about F1 terms, except that F1 is not very popular in the U.S. so British/Australian/etc. spelling should be preferred. Royalbroil 04:34, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
Speaking about that, how prevalent is curb vs. kerb? I had to read the use of the word "kerb" to figure out that kerb meant curb to the U.S. Would speakers who use the word "kerb" understand that curb = kerb? Royalbroil 05:01, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
Me, obviously as I contributed the kerb-hopping piece. My real world job is in civil engineering road design and kerb is the official spelling of the industry. --Falcadore (talk) 05:14, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
I used to work at an American civil engineering company, so I'm familiar with American terminology on roads. Is curb an alternate name/spelling for kerb in Australia or it is always kerb? If the words are spelled so differently that it's hard for a reader to understand, then at the first instance in each definition we can provide the alternate spelling in the form kerb (curb). I'm sure than any reader should be able to figure out some national variations like tyre=tire, I'm more concerned when there are 2 or more different letters. Royalbroil 05:48, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
Never known of another spelling. Australia tends to follow British spelling conventions but I can't help more than that I'm afraid, although, pillaged from the Macquarie Dictionary...
kerb
// (say kerb)
noun 1. a line of joined stones, concrete, or the like at the edge of a street, wall, etc.
2. Stock Exchange
a. the pavement or street as a market for the sale of securities.
b. (plural) dealings conducted after normal hours, originally in the street.
3. the fender of a hearth.
4. the framework round the top of a well.
--verb (t) 5. to furnish with or protect by a kerb. Also, Chiefly US, curb. [variant spelling of curb]
--Falcadore (talk) 06:07, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
How about having a little key at the top of the page showing spelling used and alternative spelling? Or is that going too far? Schumi555 (talk) 07:56, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
In the UK we always say 'kerb' too, (unless it's 'curb' as in to curb / curtail something - different meaning entirely). Why not just have both spellings in entries that differ between the two versions of English? We could also specify where terms are specifically US or otherwise? Bretonbanquet (talk) 20:41, 21 January 2009 (UTC)

Good source[edit]

http://www.f1technical.net/glossary/ --Sporti (talk) 07:56, 22 January 2009 (UTC)

What makes it reliable? AlexJ (talk) 15:32, 23 January 2009 (UTC)

Spare car[edit]

I'd like to remove spare car. Firstly, because its inaccurate. Spare cars are not always prepared in the event of the prime car is damaged. Sometimes the set-up is different and they are trying different things. Secondly, its too obvious. It's not terminology at all. Spare car does not need further explanation beyond the original meaning of the two words and does not gain additional context in a motorsport environment. T car however I would support. --Falcadore (talk) 22:59, 27 January 2009 (UTC)

Similarly Driver development program is badly worded and obvious with no additional meaning derived. a program used by racing teams to develop younger drivers. That is like saying a Student Advancement Program is a program for advancing students, or that a Boost Reversal Circuit is a circuit for reversing the boost. --Falcadore (talk) 23:04, 27 January 2009 (UTC)
Driver Development Program is a very important NASCAR term right now. If it doesn't apply to any other genres of motorsport, then it probably should be removed from this list as this should be primarily a generic list. It already has an article for someone to wikilink to.
Spare car - The top American national touring series, especially NASCAR/IndyCar/USAC midgets&sprint cars, have a "Backup car" which is a car with the same paint job as the "primary car". It may or may not have the same setup under it. All but the most underfunded teams brings a spare/backup car to the track. So there's more to say beyond a dictionary definition. What's a T car? Royalbroil 03:59, 28 January 2009 (UTC)
T-car, test car, usually with the T written next to or instead of the race number, its another wording for spare car that actually does need explanation.
I am not saying that Spare car and driver development program are not used in a motorsporting context. As they are presently worded they are not terminology at all, but plain everyday language with the explanation not providing any further information and I am questioning their inclusion on that basis. I mean will we have to add an entry for car? --Falcadore (talk) 07:44, 28 January 2009 (UTC)
I didn't have time to work on it yet. Since driver development program appears to be a NASCAR-specific term, it probably should get removed. Royalbroil 13:02, 28 January 2009 (UTC)

Spare car should stay - I quickly added a definition for use on the 1995 European Grand Prix article. It needs to be adjusted, I agree, but it definitely shouldn't go. There isn't an article on it... so a short explanation should fit in here. D.M.N. (talk) 16:05, 28 January 2009 (UTC)

Official[edit]

official is the same as steward, not marshal - in my experience, having held some positions, official is a catch-all term covering marshals (senior, flag, fire, crowd & recovery), stewards, scruitineers (techinical inspectors), timekeepers, and P/A announcers/commentators. Stewards, specifically administrate/adjudicate/arbitrate issues specifically involved in the rules governing the racing and the racers. --Falcadore (talk) 03:02, 3 April 2009 (UTC)

Agreed. I had made the change from marshal to steward. It should get its own definition. Like you said, there are many types of officials. Royalbroil 03:17, 3 April 2009 (UTC)

Fastest Lap?[edit]

Fastest Lap- too obvious or worthy of inclusion? - The fastest time in which a lap was completed by a driver during a race. Sometimes rewarded with bonus championship points. Petera93 (talk) 17:14, 15 May 2009 (UTC)

Worthy, only because "sometimes rewarded with bonus championship points". Royalbroil 05:05, 17 May 2009 (UTC)
Undoubtedly worthy. We have 'grid', 'qualifying' and the like, 'fastest lap' makes sense. Apterygial 09:40, 17 May 2009 (UTC)

Terminology that isn't terminology[edit]

Again I feel the need to bring up certain entries on this article that shouldn't be there. I am not disputing whether these entries are used in motorsport, just that they are terminology. The purpose of this page is to list anything word or groups of words that do not have obvious meaning and need to be explained to better understand their use. Plain languuage words really do not belong here because their meaning does not need additional explanation. Some examples:

Driver development program - a program for developing drivers perhaps? How is this terminology?
Drivers' meeting - A meeting where drivers and officials meet ummm... this could possibly be shifted to Drivers' briefing, but otherwise the term is completely self explanatory
Fuel - it's ummmm fuel. Methanol, Nitromethane, and Top Fuel for example could have their own entries maybe but fuel?
Put on the trailer - well.
Spare car - if that isn't blindingly obvious then maybe we need to include terms like Fuel, or driver, or car.

Thoughts? --Falcadore (talk) 07:36, 16 March 2010 (UTC)

Agree, but considering the age of the post, maybe it has already been done...I'm too lazy to look. Blackbtw (talk) 01:03, 25 June 2010 (UTC)
No it hasn't. --Falcadore (talk) 01:28, 25 June 2010 (UTC)
I disagree - you don't know how naive some people really are. I recently saw comments related to a motorsport Good Article being removed with some of the complaining saying that the article needs to provide definitions in sentence form to very obvious and self-explanatory terms like green flag, restart and pit stop. Driver's development program is being used in a bunch of articles for upcoming NASCAR people, some of who haven't made their first NASCAR start or have made only a few starts. Royalbroil 04:07, 29 June 2010 (UTC)

Possible additions to the Glossary of motorsport terms[edit]

G-force accelerator accelerometer horsepower break horsepower cadence braking — Preceding unsigned comment added by 93.96.65.94 (talk) 10:01, 5 April 2012 (UTC) torque dyno tachometer shiftlight headers straight exhaust

Thanks

Cdvrooster  — Preceding unsigned comment added by Cdvrooster (talkcontribs) 03:00, 12 July 2011 (UTC) 
Cheese Cutter / Pizza Cutter

Front wheels of a dragster which they are very narrow (pizza cutter look) compared to what would normally be installed. Very obvious on alcohol burners but most common on door slammers since it looks strange under a bodyshell.115.70.80.179 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 18:30, 26 November 2013 (UTC)

Understeer[edit]

Why "See also cross-channel ferry." - and the link isn't even general, but to one ship in particular. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 59.149.182.190 (talk) 15:10, 11 August 2014 (UTC)

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