Talk:Glutamine

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Note[edit]

I've modified this:

In people living with diseases that put long term strain on the immune system (like HIV), glutamine is burned at a higher rate. Glutamine is also used in the digestive process and -- if not supplemented -- can lead to wasting.

Glutamine may have something to do with cachexia, but the relationship between the two things is certainly not as simple as this implies. It would be nice to be able to quote a reference here. -- Someone else 02:52 Apr 12, 2003 (UTC)

Theraputic uses of glutamine[edit]

My wife, who has undergone radiation treatment to her abdominal area and is now suffering from radiation enteritis, was told by her physician that glutamine supplementation has been shown to help heal the villi lining the bowel. My subsequent reading on the web has indicated this to be a commonly accepted treatment regimen for people with radiation enteritis, irritable bowel disease, or other similar problems. Glutamine also is prescribed to HIV patients, and to patients receiving radiation and chemotherapy. -- unsigned

Adverse effects[edit]

This article concentrates on adverse effects of glutamine consumption. However, it gives zero references. This article desperately needs some work in this area. In particular, someone who knows this stuff needs to firm up the documentation. I'm not a biochemist, so I don't know how much of this information is well-supported and how much is hearsay. Gwimpey 05:59, Apr 14, 2005 (UTC)

OK, most of this page was a copyvio. I removed the offending material and put a link to the source Gwimpey 06:18, Apr 14, 2005 (UTC)

Someone might want to add a reference to bipolar disorder and glutamine. I just tried it to help with ulcerative colitis and it caused a bipolar flare. A Google search of glutamine and bipolar disorder got instant hits. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dixon pete (talkcontribs) 16:15, 26 August 2009 (UTC)

From PNA/Biology[edit]

  • Glutamine talks about all sorts of negative effects of the compound, but gives no references. Also, would be good to have information on biochemical role (it is one of the 20-odd amino acids that compose proteins). Gwimpey 06:03, Apr 14, 2005 (UTC)

Rewrite[edit]

Puhh, pretty much of this small knowledge stuff in this article. Since i just finished my diploma thesis on the cellular glutamine metabolism, i guess to have a clue about this topic. I did only delete minor aspects and commented those while doing so. But i rearranged the article and grouped the nutrition part aside of the use. Furthermore, i added functions and listed the producing and consuming organs. I did not go too much into detail, because you could fill pages about glutamine metabolism alone. The collection of the as i call them "small knowledges" i grouped them under Examples for the usage of glutamine. Interesting further functions of glutamine are found in the role in the immune system, tumor metabolism and in the glutamine glutamate cycle of the CNS. But these areas are not presented structured up to now. Maybe i do that later. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Galahadin (talkcontribs) 13:59, 4 September 2009 (UTC)

Since very little of relevance was left, I went ahead and rewrote the article. It could still use more help (as could a lot of the other amino acid articles-- I may get around to this). In particular, I removed this:

It is converted into the excitotoxin glutamate within neurons. Glutamine is then transported to the neuron and by the enzyme glutaminase, it is converted to glutamate--the potential excitotoxin. Unless it accumulates outside the brain cell it is harmless.

While arguably true, this tends to create the impression that glutamine is notable as a neurotoxin, which is false. Molybdenumblue 23:52, 16 Apr 2005 (UTC)

WPN[edit]

Ello there everyone - Spum here from WikiProject Nutrition, i'm just going to be adding some information to this article, as well as grouping it under WikiProject Nutriition (and dietetics). If you want to help, you are more than welcome to join the project. Spum 17:43, 14 December 2005 (UTC)


competition with creatine for absorbtion[edit]

Is there any truth to the claim that glutamine competes with creatine for absorption? -- Sy / (talk) 00:33, 25 March 2007 (UTC)

I guess this is a myth.. [1]
Myth: "Don't take your creatine with protein because protein contains glutamine and glutamine competes with creatine for the same transporter!"
The Real Deal: There's not an ounce of truth to this. Creatine and glutamine have completely different receptors. Creatine transport into skeletal muscle is regulated by the Creatine Transporter7 while glutamine transport into skeletal muscle is regulated by a system known as "System Nm." 8 The only thing these transporters have in common is that they are both sodium-dependent transporters, meaning that they use differences in sodium concentrations across the cell membrane to drive creatine into cells. Apparently somewhere along the line, somebody believed that since glutamine and creatine transporters both shared that characteristic, they must be the same transporter and the myth spread from there. Let the confusion end here: they do not share the same transporter, and taking protein/glutamine with creatine won't decrease creatine uptake into muscle.

On the subject of raw vs cooked glutamine[edit]

May I please ask what is wrong with the idea of indicating on this page that cooked food contains no glutamine useful to the human body? I've attempted three times now to add this to the document only to find it reverted because the references weren't quite kosher. One only needs to google for "glutamine cooked OR cooking" to see that just about ever page on this subject indicates that cooking destroys glutamine. The last time I changed the page, it wasn't simply reverted, but ALL references to raw food were removed. Even ones I didn't add.

I can understand that from a scientific viewpoint, the glutamine might not actually be destroyed by cooking, but cooking removes 100% of glutamines usefulness to the human body, and this is a page about nutrition right? CrazyEddy (talk) 13:13, 18 November 2007 (UTC)

Just add a WP:RS and your all set. Although I fail to see how it's relevant when the only people who benefit from this chemical are people who either had surgery or have some serious intestinal problems in which case they wouldn't cook it before using it. Pocopocopocopoco (talk) 18:11, 25 November 2007 (UTC)
Here's one: Shabert, Judy, MD, RD; Nancy Ehrlich (SciAm's medical publishing division) (1994). "Preventing Muscle Breakdown". The ultimate nutrient, Glutamine. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publishing Group. pp. p. 20. ISBN 0-89529-588-1. ...and since much of the glutamine present in foods is inactivated by exposure to heat or cooking,...  . Two more quotes from the same page: "Glutamine is not in these products [powdered protein supplements for bodybuilding] because heat is used during the processing of powdered supplements, and glutamine is destroyed at high temperatures.", and "Most liquid protein supplements also do not contain additional glutamine. At room temperature, glutamine gradually degrades and loses its potency. The actual quantity of glutamine cannot be ensured unless the formula is kept refrigerated. However, glutamine powder can be added to a liquid protein supplement, which should then be refrigerated and used w/in several days." --Jerome Potts (talk) 06:28, 31 December 2007 (UTC)

Fix needed[edit]

The 3-D model of glutamine on this page is wrong. Would somebody please fix it? It's showing two carboxylic acid groups, rather than an amide! (It is GLU instead of GLN, please change it ASAP, it's a really big one for an error...)

Fixed now. --Ed (Edgar181) 15:26, 1 December 2007 (UTC)

L-[edit]

This article sometimes refer to "Glutamine" and others to "L-Glutamine". the "L-" prefix is explained in Amino acid#Isomerism and in Optical isomerism#By configuration: D- and L-, but i had to hunt for it. This article should either repeat the information available in those pages, or point to them.
--Jerome Potts (talk) 05:10, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

complete boll*x[edit]

I suspect a lot of this article is very inaccurate. It can cure cancer? Not remotely likely. We can say believers in it believe that, but that's all we can say, for WP:NPOV. Sticky Parkin

This is all bullshit. Taken as a suppository? absorbed in the lower intestine? precursor for DNA? DNA is made out of nucleotides, NOT amino acids, and nothing is absorbed in the colon except for water...wtf. delete this page...its moe accurate as a stub stating its an amino acid. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.69.181.111 (talk) 08:03, 24 July 2009 (UTC)

Glutamine is actually a common amine donor group and is involved on the synthesis of several compounds such as the nucleotides and therefore DNA —Preceding unsigned comment added by 18.114.7.62 (talk) 20:09, 28 August 2009 (UTC)

Precursor for rapidly dividing immune cells, thus aiding in immune function[edit]

Strange sentence. Cells are simply a lot bigger than a tiny amino acid. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.133.8.114 (talk) 22:30, 4 February 2009 (UTC)

Glutamine is an analog of theanine?[edit]

Who cares? Glutamine is an analog of lots of things. I'm deleting this sentence. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.36.164.205 (talk) 06:09, 9 November 2009 (UTC)

Glutamine catabolism?[edit]

I'm unable to find out how glutamine is catabolized, either here in wikipedia OR in my biochemistry textbook! —Preceding unsigned comment added by Tedtoal (talkcontribs) 17:36, 6 June 2010 (UTC)

Questionable Sources[edit]

This article quotes from a website that is from a company that is attempting to promote and sell its product (source #2). This is in violation of Wikipedia source policy. Also source #17 leads to LIVESTRONG.com, again a website that would not be considered credible in an academic setting. Additionally, neither of these sources are cited correctly. Jezebel1264 (talk) 04:13, 18 November 2013 (UTC)

Molecular Formula[edit]

What's the molecular formula?
Eg: Phenylalanine has a chemical formula of C9H11NO2 but a molecular forumla of C6H5CH2CHCOOH
~ender 2014-10-06 5:56:AM MST — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.223.87.212 (talkcontribs) 12:56, 6 October 2014 (UTC)

for the condensed formula see here Jytdog (talk) 13:16, 6 October 2014 (UTC)
OP posted this on several amino acid pages; please see discussion here: Talk:Tryptophan#Molecular_Formula Jytdog (talk) 14:17, 6 October 2014 (UTC)

Image[edit]

What's with the line angle image of gluamine's structure, I don't believe it could exist in that form at any pH. Vokesk (talk) 00:07, 12 December 2014 (UTC)

Why does "levoglutamide" redirect here?[edit]

Not mentioned. 109.157.79.50 (talk) 01:10, 17 January 2015 (UTC)

It's listed as a synonym in the infobox. Deli nk (talk) 01:37, 17 January 2015 (UTC)