Talk:Gold

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Former featured article candidate Gold is a former featured article candidate. Please view the links under Article milestones below to see why the nomination failed. For older candidates, please check the archive.
November 21, 2004 Featured article candidate Not promoted

Catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles[edit]

I can see no reference to the catalytic activity of gold metal in the article. There has been a revolution in the field of catalysis at the end of the 80's, until then Au was considered to be inert compared to its neighbors in the periodic table. Haruta's investigations<ref>Haruta, Masatake (1987). "Novel gold catalysts for the oxidation of carbon monoxide at a temperature far below 0 oC". Chemistry Letters. 16 (2): 405. doi:10.1246/cl.1987.405. Retrieved 23 October 2014.  More than one of |pages= and |page= specified (help)</ref> showed that gold particles at the nanometer scale exhibits a catalytic activity during the oxidation of carbon monoxide, whereas bulk gold is inactive. Today gold nanoparticles are used in a wide range of catalytic reaction, especially for aerobic oxidations<ref>Takale, Balaram S. (2014). "Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis". Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry. 12 (13): 2005. doi:10.1039/C3OB42207K. Retrieved 23 October 2014.  More than one of |pages= and |page= specified (help)</ref>.

sign 21:11, 23 October 2014‎ Eulaille

Food additive informaiton updated.[edit]

1.EU The gold as food additive are only approved for use in certain food, and the practical laws and requirements may differs from each member states.[1]:

  • quantum satis , only decoration of chocolates.
  • quantum satis , only liqueurs.
  • quantum satis , only external coating of confectionery.

2.U.S. There are no gold approved for use as food additive or substance in food.[2][3][4]

References

  1. ^ "Lists of authorised food additives". EUROPAEuropean CommissionDG Health and ConsumersOverviewFood and Feed Safety. 
  2. ^ "Food Additive Status List". 
  3. ^ "GRAS Notices". 
  4. ^ "Everything Added to Food in the United States (EAFUS)". 

External links modified[edit]

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External links modified[edit]

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ENGVAR change[edit]

Parcly Taxel Here WP:ENGVAR is changed from en-US to en-GB. Can you clarify that? (While we are here, I ask you to provide more clarifying & direct editsummaries, esp when doing bigger edits. Frivolities make it hard to understand the edit). -DePiep (talk) 11:56, 31 July 2017 (UTC)

Sorry, I missed this call for discussion and undid it. All spellings were standardized by that point to be AmE, with, according to the authomated tool, three exceptions: "aluminium" (governed by WP:ALUM rather than actual grammar, so this means nothing), "caesium" (same), and "jewellery" (no hits in the text itself). If I had seen this call before I had made the edit, I would have waited for response. I don't see how it could be justified anyway, though.--R8R (talk) 12:18, 31 July 2017 (UTC)
Also there is no language tag at the top of the page declaring American spelling. Will add it. Parcly Taxel 12:24, 31 July 2017 (UTC)
In element articles, en-US is standard, some articles have en-GB (potassium). However, the spelling of aluminium, caesium, sulfur is governed (dictated) by the IUPAC name definition, not by wiki spelling choices and so is unrelated to article's ENGVAR.
R8R, this talk was started from Parcly Taxel's edit (see diff). -DePiep (talk) 13:01, 31 July 2017 (UTC)