Talk:Gonorrhea

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Symptoms section is incomplete: missing infection of rectum, eyes, and throat[edit]

There are many sources for this info (including my own experience - NOT cool!). But here's what the mayo clinic website describes: (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/gonorrhea/DS00180/DSECTION=symptoms)


"Signs and symptoms of gonorrhea that affects the rectum include:

   * Anal itching
   * Pus-like cutty booty from the rectum
   * Spots of bright red blood on toilet tissue
   * Straining to have a bowel movement

Signs and symptoms of gonorrhea that affects the eye include:

   * Eye pain
   * Pus-like discharge from the eye
   * Sensitivity to light

Signs and symptoms of gonorrhea that affects the throat include:

   * Sore throat
   * Swollen lymph nodes in the neck"

Semi-protected Edit Request, April 16, 2016[edit]

Please remove or re-write the statement "Gonorrheal infections in young women are missed with genital-only testing.[21]" under the section "Screening". Reference [21] is to Meyers D; Wolff T; Gregory K; et al. (March 2008). "USPSTF recommendations for STI screening". Am Fam Physician 77 (6): 819–24. PMID 18386598. found at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18386598 with full-text pdf available at http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=18386598.

The statement "Gonorrheal infections in young women are missed with genital-only testing.[21]" in the section "Screening" is a mis-characterization of the paper referenced. The paper referenced does not make any claim on whether genital-only testing misses infections in young women. In fact, the paper does not address the accuracy of testing in any way. The paper is a discussion of policy about testing and about what groups of people should get routine testing for gonorrhea and other STDs, not whether the testing itself is accurate or the type of testing that should be done. The USPSTF believes that only people at high-risk should be tested on a routine basis and they make no judgments or statements about the accuracy of tests in that paper.

I request that this statement "Gonorrheal infections in young women are missed with genital-only testing.[21]" be removed from this article.

The statement gives the false impression the screening test in young women is inaccurate. While it is true that USPSTF does not recommend screening for women who are at low risk of infection, it is not because the screening test misses infections, it is because the goal of the USPSTF is to determine whether it is effective to screen young women who are not at high risk for infections. The screening is quite accurate, but USPSTF believes that only people with a high risk of infection need to be screened, hence their recommendation not to screen young women at low risk.

In fact, genital testing is the preferred method of testing for gonorrheal infections in all women and are the best way to know if an asymptomatic person has gonorrhea in their genital tract. The Western Sussex hospital, a UK National Health Service Foundation Trust, says "The accuracy of a single test from the genital area is between 75–95 per cent." (See the section called "How Accurate are the Tests?" on the website http://www.sexualhealthwestsussex.nhs.uk/sexually-transmitted-infections/gonorrhoea/testing/ ) The CDC in the US recommends genital specimens over urine specimens for women as well. See this paper: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6302a1.htm (Recommendations for the Laboratory-Based Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, MMWR March 14, 2014 / 63(RR02);1-19) where they say "For female screening, specimens obtained with a vaginal swab are the preferred specimen type." and "These updated CDC recommendations now specify that vaginal swabs are the preferred specimen for screening women..."

Hopefully this is enough evidence to show that the statement I quoted at the first paragraph is inaccurate and should be removed from this article. The USPSTF paper referenced by the statement does not support the statement as it is written.67.251.217.9 (talk) 21:21, 16 April 2016 (UTC)

Semi-protected Edit Request, April 17, 2016[edit]

In the Section "Screening", please change "The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for gonorrhea in women at increased risk of infection, which includes all sexually active women younger than 25 years. Extragenital gonorrhea and chlamydia is highest in men who have sex with men. Gonorrheal infections in young women are missed with genital-only testing.[21]" to say "The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for gonorrhea in women at increased risk of infection, which includes all sexually active women younger than 25 years. Extragenital gonorrhea and chlamydia is highest in men who have sex with men. [21]"

No where in the reference #21 do they speak about gonorrhea infections in young women being missed with genital-only testing. The reference does not support this statement in any way.

67.251.217.9 (talk) 16:28, 17 April 2016 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done Thanks, there is a lack of mention in the abstract about the claim about young women (which seems reverse to the objective of the article) — Andy W. (talk · contrib) 03:54, 26 April 2016 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 17 April 2016[edit]

Research

A vaccine for gonorrhea has been developed that is effective in mice. To be available for humans, it would first be required to demonstrate long term immunity and go through clinical trials [1].

References

  1. ^ Jerse, AE; Bash, MC; Russell, MW (20 March 2014). "Vaccines against gonorrhea: current status and future challenges.". Vaccine. 32 (14): 1579–87. PMID 24016806. 

Rcourt (talk) 15:57, 17 April 2016 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done Moving request down  — Andy W. (talk · contrib) 04:07, 26 April 2016 (UTC)