Talk:Great Observatories program

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Future observatories[edit]

I removed references to follow-up/future "Great Observatories," as I don't believe they technically are. I'll poke around and find a better place to put them. 24.17.30.163 02:36, 11 November 2005 (UTC)

NASA's follow-up Great Observatories program.

* James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was called the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) before being named, and is the replacement for HST.
* Space Interferometry Mission (SIM)
* Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF)

Some future Great Observatories designated probes are involved in the Beyond Einstein program
* Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a gravity-wave observatory consisting of a trio of probes in controlled separation solar orbit, slated for 2013
* Constellation-X, a constellation of X-ray telescopes flying in formation to form an interferometer, at L2, slated for 2016

challenger?[edit]

Just passing by, but this article also mentions that Spitzer was not launched by Shuttle because of Challenger. I believe this should be change to the Columbia accident, which occured in Febuary of 2003, the same year Spitzer was launched. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.136.242.206 (talkcontribs)

  • No, since these observatories and their launches are planned years in advance, it was indeed the Challenger incident that affected Spitzer's choice of launch vehicle. --Etacar11 12:53, 17 April 2006 (UTC)

0.5 nom[edit]

This article was nominated for Wikipedia 0.5, but I failed it because of having no references, rather poor prose, short lead per WP:LEAD and other concerns. Thanks Jaranda wat's sup 22:39, 13 June 2006 (UTC)

Grammatical error[edit]

"Parts which survived reentry splashed into the Pacific Ocean." Should read "Parts that survived ..."

See http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/which.htm discussion of restrictive clauses.

DaveCrane (talk) 21:18, 16 September 2009 (UTC)

Unreferenced and doubtable fact[edit]

In top paragraph: *The four missions was designed to examine a specific region of the electromagnetic spectrum using very different technologies. Dr. Charles Pellerin, NASA's Director, Astrophysics invented and developed the program during 1994.* As Hubble was launched in 1990, it seems not possible that the program was conceived *after* the first launch. A reference and further clarification is needed.